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HTML5 Games: Creating Fun with HTML5, CSS3 and WebGL Paperback – 7 May 2014

4.1 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 456 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 2nd Edition edition (7 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118855388
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118855386
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 2.1 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 875,966 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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4.1 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was looking for something to assist me a in learning JavaScript, HTML and css. Yeah, this was not a great choice. It dances around said languages and had you creating a Candy Crush type game, this seems to be its' sole purpose unfortunately.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
For beginners - or just people in web design already, wanting to catch up on current HTML5 practices and standards - this book is excellent. It assumes some grounding in basic HTML and JavaScript, but most people who have dabbled with the web could easily leap in and start trying out some of the many practical examples given. It takes a project-based approach, focusing on a jewel-type game clone through which to teach HTML5, but each chapter could well stand alone as a brief guide, and that's how I ended up using it. As such, it's equally good as a quick reference guide as well as a learning resource.

I found the section on sound handling really useful. It's particularly good, as, like the rest of the book, it keeps an eye on current browser support all the way through, laying out clearly, in tables, information regarding how each of the main browsers behaves. Likewise, it gives one of the clearest and most straightforward introductions to the canvas element that I've seen either in book or magazine form.

With an eye on the fundamentals, it might lack a little depth on more advanced topics, such as 3D graphics, but it's beyond the scope of a primer like this - it is clear on what it aims to cover, and covers that brilliantly.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As tohers have stated, it won't teach you CSS or teach you Javascript or give you a broad introduction to HTML 5.

The book does seem to have the mission of showing you how to create a Candy Crush clone which may light your fire or not - it didn't do it for me.

The assumed knowledge level was ok for me - I am a Maths and Computing teacher who can hand code a decent website in CSS if pushed (but wouldn't want to do it that way) and has been programming for years and is comfortable with javascript - your level may be different.

What is explained is clearly done but the title says it all more or less - this is applying HTML5 to the develpment of games - well, to that candy crush clone.

I wanted a more general primer on HTML 5 - this isn't that book though it did introduce me to a few things I didn't know about.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've been messing about making games for many years and in that time I have used many different tools, such as Amos, Blitz Basic, Blitz 3D, Unity, GameMaker, PlayCanvas, Construct2, DarkBasic... the list goes on. I've made games for various platforms and Unity aside (which targets just about everything) I've often felt a bit trapped by the end result. It often seemed that trying to get friends and family to try out my games so I could get some feedback was just about impossible. They don't want to deal with the hassle of downloading a file from the internet and installing it on their laptop. Or even just getting out their laptop, instead of their smartphone or tablet or whatever other device they are using to browse the web or Facebook or email.

I realised that if I was going to get more of my friends or family to try my games, they had to be as accessible as possible, i.e. on the web. I also realised that they had to be plugin-free, yes it seemed that even installing the Unity plug-in was too much hassle for many people!

With all this in mind I started looking more into the HTML5 development and hence this book. I found it really good. Lots of great examples (which I love, I find it best to learn from looking at examples) and some chapters towards the end that give a little taster of other subjects such as networking and WebGL.

Of course I must admit that having had a taster of HTML5 I will probably end up with one of the many engines (like three.js or Phaser) which makes things a little easier, but there is still plenty of learning in this book that can be applied whichever way you eventually go.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I found this a terrific development book. The author decides to focus on the technologies available with HTML5 - and those that accompany it even if they are not strictly a part of the HTML5 specification.

He doesn't look into different JavaScript frameworks and libraries, but instead creates a few useful shorthand frameworks himself, saving downloads and informing the reader of what makes such frameworks work in the first place.

Although the book is about HTML5 games, the author really uses the notion of a game to get round to the different HTML5 features, and sometimes spends time explaining a feature even if he doesn't particularly use it for the game example he gives. The focus is more on the technology and what it is capable of rather than the specific game itself. Where the game illuminates the technology, great, if the game can't really use the technology, then we learn about the technology anyway.

This is certainly a fascinating book - the code of course can be downloaded to help with study and learning - but I'd recommend it for any JavaScript and HTML developer, not just one interested in games. What is available with HTML5 is astonishing and it will save developers so much time making use of these features, there is nothing better than writing a few lines of code to access some incredible feature already provided for you.
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