Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £15.60

Save £4.40 (22%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia by [Joshi, S. T., Schultz, David E.]
Kindle App Ad

An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia annotated edition , Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£15.60

Great Reads for 99p
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to 99p each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product description

Review

..."an exhaustive reference filled with an impressive wealth of biographical and literary lore about one of the best-known writers of supernatural horror in the 20th century....An extensive, scholarly reference especially for Lovecraft enthusiasts, An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia is an essential, core, indispensable reference work for students of Lovecraft's life and work."-MBR: Internet Bookwatch

"This detailed encyclopedia is highly recommended for public and academic libraries."-Library Journal

"Recommended for all libraries, particularly those with Lovecraft or Arkham House collections."-Choice

"This guide is a comprehensive survey of the influences on the writer's work and life and the products of his literary career....the editors have provided a true service to both scholars and fans. Highly recommended for both public and academic libraries."-Lawrence Looks at Books/Gale Group.com

"[A] cornucopia of titbits to feed the most dedicated appetite for things Lovecraftian ... the ideal reference work for anyone embarking on a serious study of Lovecraft and his milieu ... [a] fine digest of information ... for those of us with a keen academic interest in Lovecraft it provides a handy, invaluable reference source. 4 STARS"-The Zone

"An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia, edited by S. T. Joshi and David E. Schultz, will please HPL purists, since it focuses on the weird writer's literary work with entries for individual stories, the more important poems and essays, fictional locales and characters (including every member of the German U-boat crew named in "The Temple"). . . . This is an indispensable volume."-Publishers Weekly

"ÝA¨ cornucopia of titbits to feed the most dedicated appetite for things Lovecraftian ... the ideal reference work for anyone embarking on a serious study of Lovecraft and his milieu ... Ýa¨ fine digest of information ... for those of us with a keen academic interest in Lovecraft it provides a handy, invaluable reference source. 4 STARS"-The Zone

?This detailed encyclopedia is highly recommended for public and academic libraries.?-Library Journal

?Recommended for all libraries, particularly those with Lovecraft or Arkham House collections.?-Choice

?This guide is a comprehensive survey of the influences on the writer's work and life and the products of his literary career....the editors have provided a true service to both scholars and fans. Highly recommended for both public and academic libraries.?-Lawrence Looks at Books/Gale Group.com

?[A] cornucopia of titbits to feed the most dedicated appetite for things Lovecraftian ... the ideal reference work for anyone embarking on a serious study of Lovecraft and his milieu ... [a] fine digest of information ... for those of us with a keen academic interest in Lovecraft it provides a handy, invaluable reference source. 4 STARS?-The Zone

?An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia, edited by S. T. Joshi and David E. Schultz, will please HPL purists, since it focuses on the weird writer's literary work with entries for individual stories, the more important poems and essays, fictional locales and characters (including every member of the German U-boat crew named in "The Temple"). . . . This is an indispensable volume.?-Publishers Weekly

?...an exhaustive reference filled with an impressive wealth of biographical and literary lore about one of the best-known writers of supernatural horror in the 20th century....An extensive, scholarly reference especially for Lovecraft enthusiasts, An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia is an essential, core, indispensable reference work for students of Lovecraft's life and work.?-MBR: Internet Bookwatch

.,."an exhaustive reference filled with an impressive wealth of biographical and literary lore about one of the best-known writers of supernatural horror in the 20th century....An extensive, scholarly reference especially for Lovecraft enthusiasts, An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia is an essential, core, indispensable reference work for students of Lovecraft's life and work."-MBR: Internet Bookwatch

About the Author

S. T. JOSHI is the author of H. P. Lovecraft: The Decline of the West (1990), Lord Dunsany: Master of the Anglo-Irish Imagination (Greenwood, 1995), H. P. Lovecraft: A Life (1996), and Ambrose Bierce: A Bibliography of Primary Sources (Greenwood, 1999), which he compiled with David E. Schultz. He has edited the standard edition of Lovecraft's fiction (1984-89, 4 vols.) and many other editions of Lovecraft's work. He is the founder and editor of Lovecraft Studies and Studies in Weird Fiction. DAVID E. SCHULTZ is a technical editor with an environmental engineering firm. He has edited a critical edition of H. P. Lovecraft's Commonplace Book (1987), and with S. T. Joshi has edited various annotated editions of Lovecraft's letters. He and Joshi also compiled Ambrose Bierce: A Bibliography of Primary Sources (Greenwood, 1999).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5777 KB
  • Print Length: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Greenwood; annotated edition edition (30 Sept. 2001)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000QXD7CE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #757,069 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 4 Jun. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Okay, first things first; this book IS expensive. Very expensive in fact. However, there is absolutely no doubt in my mind that it's worth every single penny.
It truly is one of the best reference materials for H.P. Lovecraft. It offers information on his family, friends, letters, employment history as well as providing a synopsis of most of his works. Clearly, a massive amount of research has been carried out in the writing of this book and it shows. The gigantic amount of information featured inside truly is of huge interest to anyone even vaguely interested in the life and writings of Lovecraft.
If you're looking for an invaluable resource on the man, and his work then buy this book. You will not be disappointed by what it has to offer. Highly recommended.
1 Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Adrian Drew TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Sept. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An almost definitive work! Highly rewarding for Lovecraft fans and students of his work. The effort that must have gone into compiling these facts is quite intimidating -but the end result is impressive indeed! I say "almost definitive" because nothing ever really is..... Highly recommended.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Night had descended, silently. I bent over my wee keyboard, attempting to compose my new tale of Lovecraftian horror. Aye, I admit it -- I pen weird fiction "in the tradition" of H. P. Lovecraft. Not a very honourable occupation to some, but it suits me to the core of my soul. You may ponder, why would anyone want to write stories that sound like those of another writer? The trick is to try and be influenced by Ec'h-Pi-El but not rob his fictive grave and rip-off his ideas. So -- I am bent over me keyboard, trying to work on my novel that is a sequel of sorts to "Pickman's Model," and I required a reference. I am trying to express, in a misty suggestive manner, an incident that takes place before the artist's unexplained disappearance. You've read Lovecraft's original tale, no doubt about the queer duck who painted graveyards and their weird inhabitants; painted them with such...conviction...that they seemed to be representations of that which breathes and hungers in actual reality. I was confused over a slight matter, needed elucidation.

I reached for -- The Book.

And I heard an eldritch wailing that sounded like an end to mortal time; and I asked myself, "What dripping eidolon of cacodaemonical ghastliness could sound such a spectral ululation?" The book was in my trembling hand -- its pale purple cover containing a ghostly image of Ye Master of Cosmic Horror -- and he looked every inch a horror author. Oh, it was he that I wished to emulate in mine own humble weird fiction -- it was his titan elbow beneath which I groveled, insignificantly.

I turned to page 204 and read the middle passage:

'PICKMAN, RICHARD, UPTON.
Read more ›
1 Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well, its hardly encyclopaedic, but it does add a basic set of notes to Lovecrafts works, which are- it would seem- almost invariably missing from digital editions of Lovecrafts works. However, the material is often of little value to the Lovecraft fan. One may almost suspect that Mr Joshi dumped into the mix a stiff measure of rather dry bibliographic and other analytical data from his research. Lacks true interest for the Lovecraft fan- needs to deliver more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 9 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Invaluable Companion 21 April 2009
By Dr. H - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This sweeping volume covers, more than adequately, the elements and workings beyond the wall of Lovecraft's writings. After casually sampling some of Lovecraft's best, I decided to seriously pursue his fiction as well as the man himself. This fine work has proven a wonderful guide, and its insights have greatly augmented the pleasure of the journey. I must emphatically recommend this work to anyone with more than a casual interest in Lovecraft's marvelous writings.
5.0 out of 5 stars essential 15 Jun. 2014
By Francois BON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
as a french translator of HPL, I have a permanent use of this wonderful source, so many references and pathes

not easy to navigate (no table of contents) but it works

many thanks to the authors

F Bon
htpp://thelovecraftmonument.com
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Inconsistent and Horribly Incomplete 21 Jun. 2007
By K. Tkacs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I gave this inch-thick book three stars because it IS full of good information, well researched, and will certainly be just what some people are looking for. For me, however, it was not at all what I expected (or wanted).

I was hoping that a 'Lovecraft Encyclopedia' would shed light on the fictional elements within his works. However, this encyclopedia concerns lovecraft's life, acquaintances, influences, etc.

Mostly.

It's inconsistent; if you look up "Azathoth," you get two paragraphs about the stories "he/it" appears in and those that inspired, but learn absolutely nothing about what Azathoth actually *is*. "Cthulhu" provides pages of info, but really nothing more than the geneology of the name "Cthulhu Mythos," and absolutely nothing at all about the character.

But if you look up "Lake," "Atwood," "Dombrowski" ... you at least do get a sentence or two about these fictional characters, though not much, really. Why include relatively unimportant fictional characters but include no information about the "heavy-hitters"?

Seriously diappointing; there's room for another book here.

I would have been happy if the book at least gave definitions for certain archaic words, such as "eldritch" and the like, words not found in a contemporary dictionary. But no. Or perhaps even a pronunciation guide for commonly mis-pronounced words.

I guess for now, if you want to know something about the entities in HPL's works, you have to buy a book related to the "Call of Cthulhu" role playing game or something.

If you need to do a term paper on the life of HPL, you may find some gold here; if you enjoy his stories but would like to understand them better, this will be of no help.
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice reference to Lovecraft's world 5 Aug. 2013
By faithbr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a nice book for those who like to check references of the work of H.P. Lovecraft on games, HQ, and movies.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Reference 8 Jan. 2010
By Wilum Hopfrog Pugmire, Esq. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Night had fallen, and I was bent over my keyboard, attempting to compose my new tale of Lovecraftian horror. Okay, I admit it -- I write fiction "in the tradition" of H. P. Lovecraft. Not a very honourable occupation to some, I guess. Why would anyone want to write stories that sound like those of another writer? I was sitting here, with Barbra Streisand playing in the background -- and I needed a reference; for I was basing my new story on Lovecraft's "Pickman's Model." I wanted to write a story that explained, in a misty suggestive manner, what happened just before the artist vanished. You've read Lovecraft's original tale, no doubt, about the weird cat who paints ghouls -- paints them with such finesse that they seem to be representations of things that actually breathed and moved through realms of necrophagous shadow.

I reached -- for The Book.

And I heard an eldritch wailing that sounded like the end of mortal time! What dripping eidolon of cacodaemonic ghastliness could make such spectral noise? Ah -- it was just the Streisand cd. I switched off the player and listened to hushed silence, reaching again for -- The Book. Its pale purple cover contained a ghostly image of The Master of Cosmic Horror -- he looked every inch a horror writer. It was he I wished to emulate in my own humble weird fiction -- it was his titan elbow beneath which I paid homage to his genius.

I turned to page 204 and read the middle passage:

"PICKMAN, RICHARD UPTON. In 'Pickman's Model,' a painter, of Salem ancestry, whose paintings of outre subjects are assumed to be the fruits of keen imagination, but are ultimately found to be from real life and from first-hand knowledge of forbidden subjects. He is compared to Gustav Dore, Sidney Sime, and Anthony Angarola. He disappears mysteriously, after emptying his pistol at an unseen monster lurking in the basement of his studio in the North End of Boston during a visit by the narrator of the story. In THE DREAM-QUEST OF UNKNOWN KADATH, Pickman becomes a ghoul, like the subject of many of his paintings in 'Pickman's Model.'"

I then read the rather lengthy yet succinct description of the tale that followed as next entry. And I felt a curious longing. For haven't I come to Boston and found this small apartment in the North End exactly because of my obsession with this, as some call it, "minor" tale by a Master of supernatural fiction? I held onto The Book as I put on my jacket and stepped outside. Strolling past the ancient church, I walked up the inclined street, to Copp's Hill Burying Ground. What had the editors written concerning that haunted place, which Lovecraft had invested with his ghouls. I flipped through the C section, squinting at the pages beneath the pale illumination of a street lamp -- and I was disappointed to see that there was no reference to Copp's Hill. The Book was not as thorough as one would have liked.

What was its purpose, then, this nameless tome? Was it naught but a reference of what the editors felt were the most important names of persons and places in Lovecraft's poetry and prose? Yes, I think that was the purpose that it served. I turned to the Preface and examined the lines of text -- and found:

"A word must now be said on what is NOT included in this volume.
One of the most popular aspects of Lovecraft;s work is what has come to be known as the 'Cthulhu Mythos' (a term Lovecraft himself never used). His literary pantheon (entities who, in many cases, prove merely to be extraterrestrials from the depths of space) has proved fascinating to readers and writers alike... The 'gods' themselves, with rare exceptions, do not figure as 'characters' in any meaningful sense in the tales, so there are no entries on them."

So much for Nyarlathotep, I thought -- for the Crawling Chaos was the "god" with whom I was most obsessed. If anything deserved an entry, it was "Him" (It?). Night had fallen, and the gate to the burying ground was locked. I turned away from it and leaned my back against its chilling black metal. I flipped through The Book until I came to page 190. "He" was there!

"'Nyarlathotep.' Prose poem (1,150 words); probably written in November or December 1920. ...Nyarlathotep emerged out of Egypt. He begins giving strange exhibitions featuring peculiar instruments of glass and metal and evidently involving anomalous uses of electricity."

I heard a far-off wailing sound in dark heaven, accompanied by a singular buzzing voice that almost spoke my name. I looked above me, to the lamp post; and I wondered why it looked so queer, so black; why its single bulb peered down on me as if it would devour me. I placed half of The Book into my mouth, grabbed onto the cold metal of the gate and hurled myself over it, into the burying ground. I crawled on chilly earth until I came to the tall marker that had been toppled over, thus revealing a set of earthy steps that led down, below the cemetery sod, into blackness illimitable.

The Book was in my mouth. How strange that I could feel the ink with which its nameless text had been printed move along my tongue. I felt that text move over my tongue and slip upward, to my brain. The language of The Book dripped upward, like sentient ichor that sought to dwell within the recesses of my cracked skull. The buzzing above me had ceased, but now I heard another noise -- a deep uncanny breathing from the pit of blackness beneath me. I imagined that it whispered, "You fool -- come down." And so I crept, with Book in mouth, down the cold steps of sediment, to my unhallowed doom.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know
click to open popover