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Growing Up Digital: Rise of the Net Generation (Oracle Press Series) Paperback – 5 Sep 2000

4.0 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; New edition edition (5 Sept. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071347984
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071347983
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,010,451 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Amazon Review

With the help of about 300 members of the Net Generation, or N-Gen, Don Tapscott explores what the Internet and other digital interactive technology is doing to and for our children. Despite fears that new technology is making kids more antisocial and less intellectual, Tapscott shows that kids are using it to play, build relationships and explore their world. And while the digital world has dangers, it also has greater opportunities.

Tapscott shows the role technology plays in how N-Genners learn, socialize among themselves, and interact with friends and family--often through insightful quotes from the kids themselves. Tapscott demonstrates how many clear truths, for instance that learning is social, have led to false conclusions, such as that computer use, being an individual activity, hampers social learning. And, with his N-Gen helpers, he puts the hype about Net porn in perspective. As one 15-year-old puts it, "I have never 'stumbled' into a site I didn't want to see. Not like on TV where I have occasionally flicked the channel only to 'stumble' into some gruesome murder scene." Yet the author also acknowledges that every new development has its problems and offers commonsense caution, quoting Alan Kay: "We don't have natural defenses against fat, sugar, salt, alcohol, alkaloids--or media. Television should be the last mass-communications medium to be naively designed and put into the world without a surgeon general's warning." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Growing Up Digital has some very good insights
Like most US business books, Growing Up Digital, has some very good insights.

Tapscott, a US internet guru, explores the simple premise that the "net generation" will have a huge impact on the way we work. That's because they are teaching us. "n-genners" are today's two-to 22-year-olds who have grown up digital, and are utterly comfortable with technology. In fact, such is the speed at which kids are outpacing adults, there is now a generation 'lap' rather than 'gap'.

This book helps explain the draw of the computer for children, and how it affects the way they think.

Marketing - March 2000

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Growing Up Digital is a must read for parents, educators, business leaders, and anyone else concerned about the future. According to Don Tapscott, the fact that the Net Generation is the first to know more about technology than their parents and to control the use of the new media has serious implications that must be considered. Their expertise and knowledge are causing a power shift in the relationship of children in the family, the school, and potentially the workplace, and the economy. Throughout the book, Tapscott discusses the potential impact of the N-generation on these institutions and enthusiastically paints a reassuring picture of the new technologies overall effects. He bases his conclusions on anecdotal evidence, case studies, personal interviews, and research conducted in a limited number of newsgroups, chats and MOOs. His findings suggest that children have been empowered by the digital media to develop critical thinking skills and use technology to gather, evaluate, and synthesize information. They thrive on interacting and communicating, and are developing skills in collaborating and teamwork. Though they reject many aspects of the status quo, they are active proponents of saving the environment and the planet. They accept diversity and have global awareness and consciousness.
Tapscott creates a roadmap of the changes he believes must take place in education and industry in order to accommodate the n-generation. He outlines the new role that teachers must take-that of facilitator and motivator--and urges a shift from pedagogy to the creation of learning partnerships and learning cultures with both teachers and students participating in the design. He proposes a learning model of student-centered discovery enabled by emerging technologies.
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Format: Paperback
Maybe my expectations were too high based on the reviews. I found most of the information in this book to be news items. Also, anyone that follows technology in the news will not find much insight into this book. The book is an overview of how the younger generation uses technology in their social lives, play and work. If you are not very familiar with the internet and don't watch the news this book would be worthwhile. However, anyone who uses the internet and keeps up on the news won't get much out of it.
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Format: Hardcover
Another reviewer called this book a masterwork. Odd indeed. To prove he's a clueless boomer Mr. Tapscott doesnt even include URL's to the few interesting points he makes in the book.
Like Mr. Tapscott apparently many of the parents of these children are techno illiterate. The false conclusion tappie reaches is that this makes the children experts and masters of the technology. By the examples they give, most are merely superficial users of a technology - not creators or shapers of technology.
In summary what can you expect from a book written by a boomer guided by a bunch of teenagers. Find a real teenager to talk to and skip this book.
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Format: Hardcover
I had high hopes for this book. I was very disappointed. The only good side to this book is the demographics, but even now I am doubted the validity of those. Tapscott early on tells the reader that this book was a complilation of net users and the internet generation's opinions. Some of the quotes said by the children is hard to imagine. THe quotes are edited entirely, and his opinions on the internet age is too baised. He is looking at the internet as a man who is 100 years old - before the conception of the internet. Don't read if you know something about the internet. Others can read it as a fantasy. In fact, some portions of the book are so far-fetched that would make good comedy at a University lecture for computer majors.
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Format: Hardcover
Tapscott addresses salient points about the Net generation and its expecations of educators, whether they be in K-12 or Higher Education. His discussion of the haves/have-nots (knows, know-nots?) is especially significant. According to the author, N-gen leaders of the future are already developing their global awareness and the next generation will be more protective of the earth's resources and more interested in a peacful coexistence. Let us hope he is right. REVIEW: Faculty in Higher Ed should read this book I found Tapscott's "Growing Up Digital" an answer to my ever-growing questions about the young people arriving on the doorsteps of colleges around the country. As I attend conferences and discuss the characterization of our "new arrivals" I am increasingly confronted with the question of "What are we to do?" Well, for me the answer is, in part, to read this text. I have recommended it to all faculty groups on campus, to my VP's of Academic Affairs and Student Services, to members of our teacher-training task force, as well as to those Universities to which our students articulate. Tapscott reminds us of the multi-faceted nature of the "issue" we are all facing, as we attempt to retrain ourselves, to prepare future teachers and to prepare for the next wave, that generation following (being influenced by) the N-gen-ers. I found Tapscott's insight into the Lap generation especially intriguing and his description of the need for interactive learning in the classroom a substantial challenge for faculty who have not embraced the new learning paradigm.
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