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The Grim Company by [Scull, Luke]
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The Grim Company Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 147 customer reviews

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Review

"[F]un yet fearsome, gritty and gripping in equal measure..."The Grim Company"is pretty brilliant."--Tor.com
"[S]pins a gripping tale with expertise and relish."--"The Guardian"
"[A] grisly, compelling read...hugely enjoyable."--"The Daily Mail"
"A noteworthy and gripping debut that promises to develop into an altogether superior series--one well-worth getting hooked on at the outset."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"Luke Scull delivers a fantastic story that is ripe with action, strong characterization and a tight plot....This is one debut not to be missed and marks Luke Scull as one of epic fantasy's talented debutants."--Fantasy Book Critic
"[A] rollicking dark fantasy adventure novel. It moves with verve and pace...and is threaded through with a great sense of humor."--The Wertzone
"Highly memorable with a great cast and an even greater story all wrapped up in a mature world, told by a true story-teller."The Grim Company"is one of the best fantasy books you will read this year."--SFBook.com
"Luke Scull is more than good. He's the sort of author you buy on publishing date and read on the way home."--TheBookBag.co.uk"

About the Author

Luke Scull is a videogame designer and has worked on numerous bestselling fantasy roleplaying game franchises. He was born in Bristol, England and now divides his time between the UK and Argentina.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1753 KB
  • Print Length: 401 pages
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus (1 Mar. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00APDVEJI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 147 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,332 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 Mar. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Davarus Cole has a destiny. Only he can wield the sorcerous blade Magebane, one of the few weapons in existence that can kill a Magelord. Five centuries ago the Magelords slew the gods themselves, becoming immortal in the process and seizing control of the world. Now they wage war amongst themselves. Cole knows it is fate itself which has decreed that he will kill Salazar, Magelord of Dorminia, and liberate the city from his tyrannical rule. His comrades in the rebel group known as the Shards are less sure.

Meanwhile, a new threat is rising in the far north. Demonic forces are spilling into the northern mountains and the Shaman, the Magelord who rules the region, must face this threat whilst also confronting a renegade lord who has turned against him. At the same time, he owes a favour to Salazar that must be repaid.

The Grim Company is the opening volume of the fantasy trilogy of the same name. It's the debut novel by Luke Scull, a computer game designer who has worked for BioWare and Ossian Studios. It's also one of the SFF launch titles for Head of Zeus, a new publisher which won the publication rights to the novel in a significant auction.

It's easy to see why. The Grim Company is a rollicking dark fantasy adventure novel. It moves with verve and pace, fitting more plot than some entire trilogies into its lean 450 pages, and is threaded through with a great sense of humour that pokes fun at some of the conventions of both epic fantasy and the recent eruption of 'grimdark' fantasies in particular.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dark and twisted.

The title and blurb make the book sound more heroic than it is, there is no real quest and fellowship here, the characters are varied and often unlikeable and the quest is of questionable importance.

This is very much in the style of Joe Abercrombie, the 2 old warriors and the godlike mages fell very familiar, but there is more than enough here to make it interesting in its own right.

The characters are an interesting mix, the main protagonist Cole is an irritating and arrogant fool for most of the book and we do get to see his personality change as the arrogance is literally beaten out of him, some of the other character are interesting too, the Supreme Augmentor is an unusually well drawn character for a bad guy, he is used to show that there is no simple good and evil here but that the mages inspire loyalty and believe in what they do.

The book does start slowly and the only real flaw is that Cole is annoying for the first half so his part of the plot is a bit weak.

The plot is good, there is plenty of misdirection, back stabbing and a few twists along the way and the ending is good, dark and complex with no clean victories for anyone.

The mages' war in the background and the history of killing the gods and breaking the world allows a lot of scope for future books.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was, initially, very unsure about this book as it seems to be written in quite an adolescent style, but it grew on me until, having reached the end, I want the next in the series to see what happens next.

The characters area mixed bag. Davarus Cole is an egotistical teenager with a hero complex and it's his story line that makes for most of the adolescent feel of the writing. His object of lust, Sasha is a bit two dimensional. The main characters of Brodar Kayne and his partner, Jarek, 'The Wolf' are more fleshed out and make for good protagonists. Other characters become quite interesting too, not least Eremul, 'The Halfmage'.

The writing is still a bit like a teenager describing a shoot-em-up video game and don't expect literary merit in here, but if you can disengage your brain for a while, it's still quite enjoyable. And like several similar novels, it's clear that this is just the first book, carrying the weight of establishing characters, that will launch the following books more dynamically.

Not a particularly memorable read but I still enjoyed it and will buy the sequel.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is a dark and gritty tale. The world building is excellent and I enjoyed the set up of the Magelords and the war against the Gods. The characters are well drawn though I did wonder, as I read, why the 'hero' shifted from one person to another as the book progressed. This was perhaps clever plotting, bearing mind the ending and the set up for book two, or the realisation that the original hero wasn't that likeable and heroic. I am choosing to believe it was the former of the two - the book is too well written and engrossing for it to be the latter.
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I've been reading a lot of fantasy recently and I must admit I was quite looking forward to this book, however I found it a bit of a letdown.

My first issue is that although fantasy is often derivative I thought this book took it too far. To say it seemed to be influenced by Joe Abercrombie is an understatement. I don't normally mind that, especially in fantasy where certain themes are explored again and again, but here it seemed a bit too in your face and shameless.

Having said that the similarity to Joe Abercrombie wouldn't have mattered so much if he hadn't quickly fallen into the same hole that Joe Abercrombie fell into, namely that as his writing got darker it also lost a lot of its enjoyment. Most of Abercrombie's books got away with it though because many of his characters are quite enjoyable. That isn't really true here, with most of the main characters seeming like very very light weight copies of characters from the First Law trilogy. There's an attempt to fill them out a bit, make them less 2D and cliched and even bring in a bit of humour, but it didn't really work out too well.

In addition one complaint I have about Abercrombie's books is that the events can seem pointless as at the end of each book he rams down your throat the fact that none of what happened mattered, we're back to square one as it was all just a tiny step in the ongoing battle between the magi. I had the same feeling here, the end of the book has a whole series of back stabbings and U-turns which, while maybe realistic, would have seemed better to me as introductions to the next book.

Having said that it isn't an awful book, its just highly derivative and has most of the flaws of the work its influenced by but few of the positives. With that in mind if you haven't read Joe Abercrombie's books or like them and want to read more of the same then this is probably for you.
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