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Grief is the Thing with Feathers by [Porter, Max]
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Review

* Rights sold in thirteen countries *
* Finalist for the Guardian First Book Award *
* Finalist for the Goldsmiths Prize *

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" . . . follows a father of two through the year after the death of his wife. The chapters are compressed, poetic vignettes that evoke the chimera of grief through suggestion and indirection. And then, more evocative still: the arrival of a giant, metempsychotic raven straight out of Ted Hughes s "Crow." You quickly forget that the book is weird as hell, because it is also beautiful as hell, moving as hell, and funny as hell. Garth Risk Hallberg in The Millions Year in Reading

In this slyly funny and thrillingly original work, Max Porter somehow pulls a brand new story out of the darkest despair. Jenny Offill

I m not sure I ve read anything like Max Porter s book before. It stunned me, full of beauty, hilarity, and thick black darkness. It will stay with me for a very long time. Evie Wyld

One of the only accurate representations of grief I have ever found in literature. [Max Porter] combines verse, narrative, essay, myth, drama, jokes, bad dreams, and the language of therapy in a way that seems magical, permanent, utterly integrated, as impossible to distill to its components as it would be impossible to remove or isolate grief from love, or from life itself. Says Crow of grief, It is everything. It is the fabric of selfhood. Sarah Manguso

Less a novel than a totally new and feathered thing hilarious, poetic, cheeky, postmodern, I guess, but in the most earnest and emotionally forthright way. I was as gripped as I was stunned by Porter's linguistic daredevilry, his intelligence, his emotional go-for-the-gut-ness. I loved this book. Heidi Julavits

Utterly astonishing. Truly, truly remarkable. Nathan Filer

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" is heartrending, blackly funny, deeply resonant, a perfect summation of what it means to lose someone but still to love the world and if it reminds publishers that the best books aren t always the ones that can be pigeonholed or precis-ed or neatly packaged, so much the better. Sarah Crown, "The Guardian"

" Grief Is the Thing With "Feathers is the most exquisite little flight of a story captured between hardback covers, and its appearance has been crafted to show us that we are in for something unusual. This deeply moving book about death and its grief-stricken consolations love and art appears to be no more than a scattering of text, dialogue and poetry that lifts and settles on the page, the frailest sort of thing. Yet as we read on, we become aware that the way it has been put together is robust indeed. . . . "Grief is the Thing with "Feathers shows us another way of thinking about the novel and its capabilities, taking us through a dark and emotionally fraught subject, one airy page after another, as though transported by wings. Kirsty Gunn, "The Guardian"

Like [Ali Smith], Porter has the language-sense to know how to use simple words to get at the toughest of subjects. Like her, he knows how to be playful and serious at once. . . . A blast and a breeze and, strangely, a delight. Jonathan Gibbs, "The Independent"

A meditation, in vignettes, on grief, love and literature. . . . Funny and warm and real, this little book is one to linger on and savour. Francesca Wade, "The Telegraph"

Captures some beautiful truths about love and loss. . . . [It] works because of what it demands its reader provide: we have all lost someone, or love someone whom we fear losing, and so in the gaps and silences provided by this book we are invited to supply our own grief, our own love, our own hope, and this transforms the work into a luminous reading experience. Anna Girling, "Times Literary Supplement"

A beguiling literary hybrid, highly deserving of its "Guardian" First Book Award longlisting. Lucy Sholes, "The Observer"

I read ["Grief Is the Thing With Feathers"] through . . . and ended it amazed and disturbed and uplifted and shattered. I've never read anything like it. It s dazzlingly good. . . . Anyone who has ever loved someone, or lost someone, or both, will be gripped by it. . . . Crow is the blackest, blankest bad-guy I ve met for years: Christopher Walken cross-bred with The Joker (in feathers). Robert Macfarlane"

* Rights sold in thirteen countries *
* Finalist for the Guardian First Book Award *
* Finalist for the Goldsmiths Prize *
* Shortlisted for the International Dylan Thomas Prize *
A heartbreaking and life-affirming meditation on the dislocating power of grief. . . . Porter s characters express their feelings through observations that are profound and simply phrased. . . . The powerful emotions evoked in this novel will resonate with anyone who has experienced love, loss, and mourning. " Publishers Weekly"

Porter delivers a staggering tale of a father grappling with the sudden loss of his wife in this sharply poetic and darkly stunning debut novel. . . . A truly exceptional work of fiction. . . . Readers will not soon forget Porter s distinct style. Booklist," "starred review

Porter s daringly strange story skirts disbelief to speak, engagingly and effectively, of the pain this world inflicts, of where the ghosts go, and of how we are left to press on and endure it all. Elegant, imaginative, and perfectly paced. A contribution to the literature of grief and to literature in general. "Kirkus Reviews," starred review

"A haunting debut." "Brooklyn Magazine"
"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" . . . follows a father of two through the year after the death of his wife. The chapters are compressed, poetic vignettes that evoke the chimera of grief through suggestion and indirection. And then, more evocative still: the arrival of a giant, metempsychotic raven straight out of Ted Hughes s "Crow." You quickly forget that the book is weird as hell, because it is also beautiful as hell, moving as hell, and funny as hell. Garth Risk Hallberg in The Millions Year in Reading

In this slyly funny and thrillingly original work, Max Porter somehow pulls a brand new story out of the darkest despair. Jenny Offill

I m not sure I ve read anything like Max Porter s book before. It stunned me, full of beauty, hilarity, and thick black darkness. It will stay with me for a very long time. Evie Wyld

One of the only accurate representations of grief I have ever found in literature. [Max Porter] combines verse, narrative, essay, myth, drama, jokes, bad dreams, and the language of therapy in a way that seems magical, permanent, utterly integrated, as impossible to distill to its components as it would be impossible to remove or isolate grief from love, or from life itself. Says Crow of grief, It is everything. It is the fabric of selfhood. Sarah Manguso

Less a novel than a totally new and feathered thing hilarious, poetic, cheeky, postmodern, I guess, but in the most earnest and emotionally forthright way. I was as gripped as I was stunned by Porter's linguistic daredevilry, his intelligence, his emotional go-for-the-gut-ness. I loved this book. Heidi Julavits

Utterly astonishing. Truly, truly remarkable. Nathan Filer

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" is heartrending, blackly funny, deeply resonant, a perfect summation of what it means to lose someone but still to love the world and if it reminds publishers that the best books aren t always the ones that can be pigeonholed or precis-ed or neatly packaged, so much the better. Sarah Crown, "The Guardian"

" Grief Is the Thing With "Feathers is the most exquisite little flight of a story captured between hardback covers, and its appearance has been crafted to show us that we are in for something unusual. This deeply moving book about death and its grief-stricken consolations love and art appears to be no more than a scattering of text, dialogue and poetry that lifts and settles on the page, the frailest sort of thing. Yet as we read on, we become aware that the way it has been put together is robust indeed. . . . "Grief is the Thing with "Feathers shows us another way of thinking about the novel and its capabilities, taking us through a dark and emotionally fraught subject, one airy page after another, as though transported by wings. Kirsty Gunn, "The Guardian"

Like [Ali Smith], Porter has the language-sense to know how to use simple words to get at the toughest of subjects. Like her, he knows how to be playful and serious at once. . . . A blast and a breeze and, strangely, a delight. Jonathan Gibbs, "The Independent"

A meditation, in vignettes, on grief, love and literature. . . . Funny and warm and real, this little book is one to linger on and savour. Francesca Wade, "The Telegraph"

Captures some beautiful truths about love and loss. . . . [It] works because of what it demands its reader provide: we have all lost someone, or love someone whom we fear losing, and so in the gaps and silences provided by this book we are invited to supply our own grief, our own love, our own hope, and this transforms the work into a luminous reading experience. Anna Girling, "Times Literary Supplement"

A beguiling literary hybrid, highly deserving of its "Guardian" First Book Award longlisting. Lucy Sholes, "The Observer"

One of the most surprising books this year, full of vitality and freshness. . . . Moving and ultimately uplifting. "The Spectator "(UK)

Part prose, part poetry, ["Grief is the Thing with Feathers"] is a lyrical explanation of grief and healing; exquisite passages of brilliance and beauty abound throughout. "Irish Times"

"Grief is the Thing with Feathers," by Max Porter (Faber), is his debut and it is a book to cherish. It has the perfect balance of being very sad and very funny, full of darkness and full of light. "Irish Times"

I read ["Grief Is the Thing With Feathers"] through . . . and ended it amazed and disturbed and uplifted and shattered. I've never read anything like it. It s dazzlingly good. . . . Anyone who has ever loved someone, or lost someone, or both, will be gripped by it. . . . Crow is the blackest, blankest bad-guy I ve met for years: Christopher Walken cross-bred with The Joker (in feathers). Robert Macfarlane"

* Winner of of the International Dylan Thomas Prize *
* Rights sold in thirteen countries *
* Finalist for the Guardian First Book Award *
* Finalist for the Goldsmiths Prize *

As resonant, elliptical and distilled as a poem, "Grief Is the Thing With Feathers" is one of the most moving, wildly inventive first novels you're likely to encounter this year. It's funny in a jet-black way yet also fiercely emotional, capturing the painful sucker-punch of loss with a fresh immediacy that rivals Joan Didion's "The Year of Magical Thinking." . . . Like C.S. Lewis' "A Grief Observed," Julian Barnes' Levels of Life, Helen MacDonald's "H is for Hawk" . . . Porter's unusual novel puts grief in its place not by dismissing it, but by confronting it dead-on as a painful but inescapable part of life. "Grief is the Thing With Feathers" is a wondrous, supremely literary, ultimately hopeful little book. NPR.org

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" argues that books, literature and poetry can help save us. This book is a sublime and painful conjuring of a family s grief and the misfit creature with the power to both haunt and help them. It is a complex story, not simply-told or sparse: Nothing is missing. Let it be a call for more great books of this length to be recognized for what they are whole. Extraordinary is a book with feathers. " Los Angeles Times"

Like a book of hours for the bereaved. . . . Mr. Porter gives expression to grief in all its emotional manifestations. . . . Unpredictably playful, [filled] with sarcasm, absurdity and black-winged humor. " The Wall Street Journal"

Porter s debut has meatiness to it a denseness of allegory and allusion; a melange of fairy tale, fable and dream. . . . The family s sadness is rendered exquisitely, both in figurative and prosaic language. . . . Layered with pathos, allusion, and humor, "Grief is the Thing with Feathers" is more than the sum of its composite elements. Pithy yet rich, the novel is a moving and astounding debut. Porter s Crow is as vivid as Hughes original, and his writing no less memorable. " Electric Literature"

Porter s collage of prose and lineated poetry is the very opposite of self-help. [ "Grief is the Thing with Feathers"] does not seek to offer answers, but instead brilliantly mimics the chaos of the grieving brain, offering a vision of how loss dramatically alters it. . . . Porter s book is a gift in its understanding of the sounds and reverberations of grief. "The Rumpus "

Allusive and half-poetic, Porter s tribute to a family s grief and to "Crow," a cycle of Ted Hughes poems, is both simple and invigoratingly bizarre: A Hughes scholar and his two sons mourn the accidental death of their mother with the help, it seems, of a plastic crow come to life. Dad, Crow, and Boys take turns narrating, tracing the arc of a mourning process that will neither be rushed nor slowed. You don t have to read Hughes s "Crow" first, but you might as well; both books are short, strange, and timeless. "Vulture"

Remarkable. . . . One-of-a-kind. . . . Heartbreaking. . . . Brilliant. " The Atlantic"

A heartbreaking and life-affirming meditation on the dislocating power of grief. . . . Porter s characters express their feelings through observations that are profound and simply phrased. . . . The powerful emotions evoked in this novel will resonate with anyone who has experienced love, loss, and mourning. " Publishers Weekly"

Porter delivers a staggering tale of a father grappling with the sudden loss of his wife in this sharply poetic and darkly stunning debut novel. . . . A truly exceptional work of fiction. . . . Readers will not soon forget Porter s distinct style. Booklist," "starred review

Porter s daringly strange story skirts disbelief to speak, engagingly and effectively, of the pain this world inflicts, of where the ghosts go, and of how we are left to press on and endure it all. Elegant, imaginative, and perfectly paced. A contribution to the literature of grief and to literature in general. "Kirkus Reviews," starred review

A whimsical and ultimately pleasing perspective on grief . . . utterly original. " Shelf Awareness"

"A haunting debut." "Brooklyn Magazine"

A short, singular, and entirely alluring book that defies convention, and definition, "Grief Is the Thing With Feathers "works like a form of literary magic. " The National Book Review"

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" . . . follows a father of two through the year after the death of his wife. The chapters are compressed, poetic vignettes that evoke the chimera of grief through suggestion and indirection. And then, more evocative still: the arrival of a giant, metempsychotic raven straight out of Ted Hughes s "Crow." You quickly forget that the book is weird as hell, because it is also beautiful as hell, moving as hell, and funny as hell. Garth Risk Hallberg in The Millions Year in Reading

In this slyly funny and thrillingly original work, Max Porter somehow pulls a brand new story out of the darkest despair. Jenny Offill

I m not sure I ve read anything like Max Porter s book before. It stunned me, full of beauty, hilarity, and thick black darkness. It will stay with me for a very long time. Evie Wyld

One of the only accurate representations of grief I have ever found in literature. [Max Porter] combines verse, narrative, essay, myth, drama, jokes, bad dreams, and the language of therapy in a way that seems magical, permanent, utterly integrated, as impossible to distill to its components as it would be impossible to remove or isolate grief from love, or from life itself. Says Crow of grief, It is everything. It is the fabric of selfhood. Sarah Manguso

Less a novel than a totally new and feathered thing hilarious, poetic, cheeky, postmodern, I guess, but in the most earnest and emotionally forthright way. I was as gripped as I was stunned by Porter's linguistic daredevilry, his intelligence, his emotional go-for-the-gut-ness. I loved this book. Heidi Julavits

Utterly astonishing. Truly, truly remarkable. Nathan Filer

"Grief Is the Thing with Feathers" is heartrending, blackly funny, deeply resonant, a perfect summation of what it means to lose someone but still to love the world and if it reminds publishers that the best books aren t always the ones that can be pigeonholed or precis-ed or neatly packaged, so much the better. Sarah Crown, "The Guardian"

" Grief Is the Thing With "Feathers is the most exquisite little flight of a story captured between hardback covers, and its appearance has been crafted to show us that we are in for something unusual. This deeply moving book about death and its grief-stricken consolations love and art appears to be no more than a scattering of text, dialogue and poetry that lifts and settles on the page, the frailest sort of thing. Yet as we read on, we become aware that the way it has been put together is robust indeed. . . . "Grief is the Thing with "Feathers shows us another way of thinking about the novel and its capabilities, taking us through a dark and emotionally fraught subject, one airy page after another, as though transported by wings. Kirsty Gunn, "The Guardian"

Like [Ali Smith], Porter has the language-sense to know how to use simple words to get at the toughest of subjects. Like her, he knows how to be playful and serious at once. . . . A blast and a breeze and, strangely, a delight. Jonathan Gibbs, "The Independent"

A meditation, in vignettes, on grief, love and literature. . . . Funny and warm and real, this little book is one to linger on and savour. Francesca Wade, "The Telegraph"

Captures some beautiful truths about love and loss. . . . [It] works because of what it demands its reader provide: we have all lost someone, or love someone whom we fear losing, and so in the gaps and silences provided by this book we are invited to supply our own grief, our own love, our own hope, and this transforms the work into a luminous reading experience. Anna Girling, "Times Literary Supplement"

A beguiling literary hybrid, highly deserving of its "Guardian" First Book Award longlisting. Lucy Sholes, "The Observer"

One of the most surprising books this year, full of vitality and freshness. . . . Moving and ultimately uplifting. "The Spectator "(UK)

Part prose, part poetry, ["Grief is the Thing with Feathers"] is a lyrical explanation of grief and healing; exquisite passages of brilliance and beauty abound throughout. "Irish Times"

"Grief is the Thing with Feathers," by Max Porter (Faber), is his debut and it is a book to cherish. It has the perfect balance of being very sad and very funny, full of darkness and full of light. "Irish Times"

I read ["Grief Is the Thing With Feathers"] through . . . and ended it amazed and disturbed and uplifted and shattered. I've never read anything like it. It s dazzlingly good. . . . Anyone who has ever loved someone, or lost someone, or both, will be gripped by it. . . . Crow is the blackest, blankest bad-guy I ve met for years: Christopher Walken cross-bred with The Joker (in feathers). Robert Macfarlane"

Book Description

Once upon a time there was a crow, a fairly famous Crow, who wanted nothing more than to care for a pair of motherless children...

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 454 KB
  • Print Length: 129 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (15 Sept. 2015)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B010KNF6JG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 160 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,717 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is probably the most unusual book I've read in 2016. Even after finishing it days ago I’m still not sure how I feel about it. Part fiction, part poetry and a few other things in between, this story is one that definitely sticks with you. The story surrounds a young family after the sudden death of their mother and wife. They cannot function without her and are overcome with grief. As a result of this a crow enters, becoming their counsellor and helper to piece the family back together.

The story is told from different perspectives – sometimes the dad, sometimes the kids and of course the crow. It is a fascinating look at how grief can affect people differently. The crow ultimately helps them to being to piece themselves back together before flying off and leaving them to continue on with their lives. This book is a short one, only one hundred and fourteen pages, but it feels like there is so much contained in such a short book. It’s difficult to even explain a little bit what this book is like. It’s wonderfully written, unique and beautiful.

This review will not remotely do this book justice. It’s dark and compelling, the crow is particularly fascinating – how he finds human’s dull except when they are grieving – and is such an interesting and poignant look at how grief can affect someone. Taken from the Emily Dickinson poem “Hope is a thing with feathers” this book is experimental, and doesn't sugar coat the harsh realities of dealing with the loss of a loved one.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Grief Is The Thing With Feathers by Max Porter is not a novel as such, more a series of vignettes that form a rumination on loss and grief.

'Dad' is in the process of writing a book about Ted Hughes when his wife dies suddenly, leaving him a widowed single father to two sons, collectively called 'Boys' in the text. Just as Dad thinks his grief is too much to bear, a visitor arrives uninvited: 'Crow', who has left the pages of Hughes' famous poetry collection to stay with the family "until you don't need me any more".

It's up the reader to decide whether Crow is real, symbolic, or a imaginary manifestation of Dad's obsession, but certainly he seems almost uncomfortably physical, literally knocking Dad off his feet and overwhelming him with his clumsy, feathery embrace and his stink of "just-beyond-edible-food, and moss, and leather, and yeast".

What follows is a collection of observations from Dad, Boys and Crow that articulate their feelings in the wake of Mum's death - not just in the immediate aftermath, but right up until Boys are grown up and making sure their late Mum becomes Granny at the same time Dad becomes Grandad. Some are desperately sad, some are tempered with humour (the time, for instance, when Boys think their father might have died too until a fart reveals he's only sleeping) and some are painfully honest (such as the time the boys trap and kill a fish in a delayed expression of anger and bitterness). Each piece is presented as free verse or prose poem, with some requiring more thought than others and having many different possible interpretations.

This is an unusual book and I'm sure it won't be to everyone's taste, but I loved it and thought it was beautifully written.
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Format: Hardcover
Grief - A word that we are most afraid of encountering in our lives. A word that has the capacity to change everything and turn life on its head and shake your being to the core. We all experience it, whether we like it or not. We have no choice in this regard. Life does not give us any choices. I guess after happiness, which we also share quite hesitatingly, grief comes close second as an emotion that is not shared. We keep it within and maybe that is when we need to be pushed to let it all out and get over it (so to say) and move on with life.

It is just that it kicks you senseless, this grief I mean. It will not let you be as well. I remember how I felt when my father passed away in 2001. Fourteen years seems to be a very long time and it probably is and yet grief is at the core of it all, mixed with regrets and prematurely died promises and hopes that we had as a family. So when I read, “Grief is the Thing with Feathers” I could not stop wondering about our lives in that phase from the time it happened to the time we moved on (did we?) and perhaps that’s why this debut by Max Porter struck such a chord with me.

“Grief is a Thing with Feathers” is a book which can be read by everyone and that is what I think every book aims to be – to be read by everyone in the long run, for people to connect with it, for people to not leave it, for people to also wonder why did it end so soon (which happens to be more often than not when I read books such as this one – which is so moving) and of course for people to reread it.

The book is about the death of a mother and how the husband and two boys come to terms with her death. It is not as easy as it sounds. Life never is and that is the beauty of this book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an astonishing book. That sounds like an over-the-top comment, but I have read many books on grief and the grieving experience, and unlike so many churned out by others, this one so accurately portrays the complicated experience of widows/widowers, especially with kids, that I was amazed to read that the author is not himself a widower. It is half-poetry, half-prose, and conveys stunningly well the emotional tsunami of grief's madness while still having to take care of everyday life as a new parent without your other half. It is not often I read a book in one sitting, but this one I did. It conveyed all the depth of the tragedy and the persistence of struggle and adaptation one must face to survive being the survivor. Porter has accomplished this in a very different style, but one which I thought perfectly fit the utterly disorientating experience of sudden bereavement and single parenting, and he did so with surprising brevity.

It is not for the newly bereaved, in my opinion, but for those who have traveled that path for a time. I nodded in agreement in some places, cried and laughed at others. I would recommend this book highly to anyone who had lost a spouse/partner but with the caveat that it is best reserved for a time after the initial shock has passed, and some strength and sanity regained. I don't think I could have read this in the first year of bereavement.

I don't know what the non-bereaved would make of this book. It might be useful to understand why someone close seems to have lost their mind in addition to their soulmate. Not sure. Someone else will need to comment on that.
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