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on 18 June 2001
I have spent five years looking for this book in English, and I still believe it was worth it. The only bad thing I have to say about the book, is, as the author explains, the fact that it has been changed into American English ( foxhole for trench etc) but that is not very often. This book is a reprint only done this year and it has been done very well. The quality of the book is superb. But more importantly, the content is excellent. The way he describes the hell he and his men had to endure is amazing. And unlike some others, of all sides, he points out constantly that it was his men that won his battles for him, under his direction. Throughout the book there is no attempts to apologise for anything that may have occurred during the war, simply the truth of what he saw and what he believed. The author is not as well celebrated as others in his army, but after reading this book you will wonder why he seems only to be mentioned in passing. Few others including historians, have had the experience combined with the humility of this man, making for a gripping read.
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on 30 October 2007
This is the first time I have read a book written by a member of the Waffen SS and I have found it to be very interesting and opened up a whole new perspective on the experiences of the combat soldier in World War II.

I found this 'unputtdownable' not wanting to wait to find out what happens next and that I think provides a good selling point.

But this does come across - at least until the latter chapters - as a book of war, war, war. There is little information on how Meyer was digesting his experiences and of the psychological impact it had on him and his soldiers.

As the book proceeds there is a transition - that may go unnoticed, due to the fast pace of the events - from the sweeping Blitzkrieg tactics of the German forces in the early years of the war, to the small scale battles for individual hills.

There is also to be found an explanation for Hitlers infamous order for his SS to remove their cuffbands.

I found that the addition of more maps in a better position within the book, would have added another dimension to reading and there are also a fair number of spelling mistakes (more than necessary), though really the quality of this book still deserves promotion.

In a few words:

Totally recommended, great read, unputtdownable.
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on 5 April 2006
I have spent five years looking for this book in English, and I still believe it was worth it. The only bad thing I have to say about the book, is, as the author explains, the fact that it has been changed into American English ( foxhole for trench etc) but that is not very often. This book is a reprint only done this year and it has been done very well. The quality of the book is superb. But more importantly, the content is excellent. The way he describes the hell he and his men had to endure is amazing. And unlike some others, of all sides, he points out constantly that it was his men that won his battles for him, under his direction. Throughout the book there is no attempt to apologise for anything that may have occurred during the war, simply the truth of what he saw and what he believed. The author is not as well celebrated as others in his army, but after reading this book you will wonder why he seems only to be mentioned in passing. Few others, including historians, have had the experience combined with the humility of this man, making for a gripping read.
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on 3 September 2010
I bought this book having seen it in the bibliography of Anthony Beevor's - D-Day. Having read a number of biography's of this nature (eg Hans Von Luck - Panzer Commander, Pip Roberts - from the Desert to the Baltic)I had an expectation.
The book starts off a little turgidly and disappointingly doesn't cover his early life and entry into the Waffen SS. That said it quickly settles into an easy reading style and is informative, if a little jingoistic on occassion. This armoured recce commander is typcal of the blitzkrieg tactics and this comes out in the book. It has been translated into American English but I haven't found that it detracts from the narrative. It could do with some additional maps but the photographs are very good and not widely published.
A good insight into the campaigns of the LAH and HJ.
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on 14 January 2014
Some times you have to look at an alternative view of the second WW and this is a great insight into a German Officer doing his duty. We may now not understand why someone of his obvious intelligence was so motivate, however I am sure his has something to do with the time and education in the years after WW1.
The winners of all wars always write the their side of the story first and I feel you should get both side of the story.
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on 5 December 2010
Good and detailed campaigns account from one of the top actors of these times... but always from a distance, without the real passion that we know must have been there . Kurt Meyer can't have achieved his extraordinary status by being a simple passer-by. He was an exceptional leader, and, according to some contemporary pictures he was actually enjoying it. So, why not be up-front and share with us what was driving him - right or wrong - and how it was possible to have fun in the summer of 44?
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on 9 September 2013
This was a book that one could hardly put down. Meyer has written a superb account of his experiences during WW2 and is recognised by historians as an outstanding leader of men. As a result of reading the book, I conducted my own battlefield tour of Normandy this year visiting various areas under Meyer's command. On visiting Hill 112 near Caen, I found it quite sad given how many lost their lives on both sides that very few ever visit.
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on 21 October 2015
This Stackpole Series always impresses with the wealth of detail and illustrations, and this is yet another example. Good read, excellent history and study of a Commander of the German Forces of WW2.
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on 11 July 2006
I agree with the previous reviewer. This book is a facinating read on the career of Kurt "Panzer" Meyer who lead his units from the front in every theatre of war he served in. I'm amazed that he is only mentioned in passing in other literature. Unputdownable!!
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on 26 September 2014
great book, apparently, birthday gift for my cousin. He was very happy with it :)
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