6 new from £39.99

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The Green Ray [1986] [DVD]

4.2 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
6 new from £39.99

LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent The Green Ray on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post

Special Offers and Product Promotions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video


Product details

  • Actors: Marie Rivière, Vincent Gauthier, Amira Chemakhi, Sylvie Richez, María Luisa García
  • Directors: Eric Rohmer
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Arrow Films
  • DVD Release Date: 26 Jan. 2004
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000DINKY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,297 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

"Eric Rohmer's 1986 drama may be the finest example of his supple and prickly artistry." - Richard Brody, New Yorker

Winner of the Golden Lion at the 1986 Venice Film Festival, this is one of Eric Rohmer s best-loved films: audiences worldwide found it only too easy to identify with this psychologically and emotionally intricate character study. Unexpectedly and unhappily single, Delphine (Marie Rivière) has to change her holiday plans at the last minute, but isn t especially enticed by any of the alternatives on offer. Having little time for the empty small talk and trivial games demanded by a social circle from which she feels increasingly alienated, she travels from her native Paris to Cherbourg to the Alps to Biarritz in quest of curing her loneliness, without knowing precisely what she s looking for. Rohmer and Jules Verne might seem unlikely bedfellows, but it s Delphine s chance encounter with the latter s novel The Green Ray that ultimately gives her hope as well as one of the most unforgettable endings in Rohmer s entire output.

Special Features:

  • Radio Interview with Eric Rohmer
  • Trailer

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This is one of the very best of Rohmer's films and repays repeated viewings. The whole construction of the story is quite superb and the acting (clearly built up by the cast in detailed rehearsals)is just incredibly compelling. Yes, it was shot on 16mm and there are a few imperfections in the film stock. I have seen the film during its screening at the NFT last year and I can confirm that the DVD transfer is very faithful indeed. If you are a lover of Rohmer's films don't be put off by technical criticisms. Buy and enjoy.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Nobody VINE VOICE on 3 Sept. 2007
Format: DVD
Some people are alone not because there's something wrong with them but because they set their ideals high and refuse to compromise simply for the sake of fitting in or not being alone. Delphine is one such person who says it's easier to deal with loneliness than an unhappy relationship. At times it appears she's being difficult and disagreeable when in reality it's her well meaning friends who fail to understand her predicament. She knows what she wants but not how to get it. "The Green Ray" was the fifth part of Eric Rohmer's 'comedies and proverbs' series and it must be said that I found the ending to have a beautiful transcendental quality that is rarely seen in contemporary cinema. The film visually might not be all that remarkable but rather it's more like a good book. It's idea will stay with you for a long time.

Cast:

Marie Riviere (The Aviator's Wife,1981; A Winter's Tale,1992)
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Rohmer in Green Ray seems to come at life from books,literature.We hear of Jules Vernes's source novel for the beautiful image that illuminates the heroine's idealistic ideas of love and relationships.She reads Dostoevsky's The Idiot at a railway station and meets a man who knows it.Delphine(Marie Riviere) can't decide where to spend her holiday,she is chronically indecisive.Her friend has dropped out on going on holiday with her,she has broken with her boyfriend,she is at her wit's end what to do,where to go.She is young and feels unable to go along with her friends'suggestions to meet somebody while alone, to get out and away more,although she tries trips to the country,trips to the mountains, time in Paris,time at the sea-side.She is superstitious,aware of star signs,aware of the meaning of chance cards or colours,in meeting her dream man.She sets herself high standards, this comes out in the eating scene,where her fastidiousness as to diet is a reflection of a yearning she cannot fulfil,leading to her tearful,labile moods.She can appear a pain in the neck,but she also shows the dark side of youth,being alone,not fitting in,being restless and frustrated with her life.The front quote from Rimbaud is apt:
"Oh that the time might come,when hearts may succumb."

She is neurotic,depressed,dislikes the commodification of one night stands,yet has no guide to give her directions.The film is distinguished by naturalistic shooting and a loose,improvisational style,set in diary form,day-by-day in which nothing much happens,but Rohmer gives us an insight through Delphine's gestures and expressions into her inner feelings,with delicacy, charm and tenderness.
Read more ›
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 29 Dec. 2013
Format: DVD
The Green Ray is quintessential Rohmer, as sure to infuriate those who don't like his style as it is to delight his fans. It is one of his lightest films, with many dialogues being improvised which gives it a particular quality, but of course there is a sense of direction to all the meandering discourses, and it is untangling these threads that makes it so pleasurable to watch. The poise is there as always, suggesting a firm structure around the improvisation. Marie Riviere plays Delphine as the ultimate Rohmer heroine, full of self-doubts and difficulties in facing the world as she tries to arrange a holiday on her own steam at the last minute, having been let down by a friend. Rohmer isn't afraid to let her try the viewer's patience with her frequent tearful moments, but you never lose your hopes for her in spite of her slightly moony reactions. Much of the film shows the awkwardness and pain of feeling out of kilter with those around you, and being powerless to bridge the gap. It's a major theme in real life, I think, but one that is seldom focused on in films, no doubt because it seems too undramatic. Music is discreetly used, mainly when Delphine chances upon a number of playing cards in the street, and the sense of place is amazing, making the film a portrait of at least four French locations of contrasting types. The last 10 minutes of the film are among the most joyous in all cinema, showing how Rohmer's sense of structure and pacing give quite unexpected depth in the final chapter, so that you are left walking on air.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
The Green Ray (Le Rayon vert, 1986) is the fifth and most critically acclaimed of Éric Rohmer's Comédies et Proverbes. A small budget production initially released on TV (Canal Plus), it won the Golden Lion and the FIPRESCI prize at the Venice Film Festival. It is a wonderful film, but then so are the other five in the series not to mention the earlier Six Moral Tales and individual works such as the exquisite The Marquise of O (1976). Rohmer's work achieves a consistently high level of excellence making it invidious to elevate one above another - basically they all have to be seen.

In many ways The Green Ray is a very typical Rohmer piece. A talky film centered on the emotional problems of a bourgeois central character, the inspiration is literary (the title comes from the 1882 Jules Verne novel of the same name), Catholic (the assumption of grace through suffering) and Pascalian. As My Night with Maud spells out Rohmer dwells on matters of chance and probability in life, of making a wager of commitment to a person or a system and having to live with the consequences. All of his films are about this to a certain extent, but perhaps none more so than this one.

Delphine (Marie Rivière) is yet another in a long line of Rohmer obsessives who seeks to create her own personal system and play god within it while the surrounding world constantly reminds her of how deluded and out of touch she is. Sabine (in A Good Marriage) and Louise (in Full Moon in Paris) are both convinced they can get what they want without question whether it be a husband or a life split equally between domestic security and risky freedom. Both films finish at the point where their lives collapse and are offered the chance to start again.
Read more ›
11 Comments 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions


Look for similar items by category


Feedback