FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Greekonomics: The Euro cr... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Greekonomics: The Euro crisis and why politicians don't get it Paperback – 14 Nov 2013

4.0 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£3.99 £1.15
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Greekonomics: The Euro crisis and why politicians don't get it
  • +
  • Beyond Debt: The Greek Crisis in Context
  • +
  • The 13th Labour of Hercules: Inside the Greek Crisis
Total price: £26.37
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Biteback Publishing (14 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849546282
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849546287
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 2.5 x 12.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 66,430 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"The book, niftily titled Greekonomics, is an interesting and accessible polemic" -Guardian Weekend

"An admirable job of rescuing Greece from the scurrilous portraits that have dominated the press" -Independent on Sunday

"Her account of the country's institutionalised rottenness...is shatteringly comprehensive" -Sunday Times Culture

"She offers three persuasive, if irreconcilable, conclusions unless Germany pays much more: that a Greek exit from the euro is too dangerous; that Greece cannot repay its debts; and that a diet of perpetual austerity risks killing the patient." -The Economist

"A lively and non-technical description of just how we got here with the euro-crisis. "-The Business Economist

"There is no doubt that Greekonomics is a good read. It has intellectual depth and insider perspective ... There are even flashes of humour." -The Independent

"An interesting and accessible polemic. "-The Guardian

"The future of the euro matters hugely to everyone in Europe, whether we are in or out of the single currency. I am delighted that Vicky Pryce has produced this book on the economic and political issue of the moment. "-Peter Mandelson

About the Author

Vicky Pryce is an economist, and former Joint head of the United Kingdom's government economic service. She lives in Clapham.


Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
good as far as it went but things move on - would be very good if the author updated it with some insight into Syriza, the real impact of austerity and what reforms really have or have not taken place in Greece.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I'd spotted this book on a shopping trip one day and decided to give it a read. As the title may suggest, it offers the audience a general insight into the Eurozone crisis including the chain of events leading to it and possible solutions to restabilise the situation. I recommend this book to anyone who, like myself, has/had little understanding of the currency's architecture and how matters quickly deteriorated in 2008 affecting certain countries far more than others. On a separate note, I was slightly disappointed to later learn that Vicky Price had in fact been incarcerated last year for perverting the course of justice.
1 Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Vicky Pryce was employed as a government economist and finally as Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service.

As she observes, the eurozone was never an optimal currency area. It was always a political project, imposed on an unwilling group of countries, whatever the cost. As the head of the European Central Bank Mario Draghi said in July 2012, “The euro is irreversible and the ECB will do everything needed to preserve it.”

But the euro is indeed, as the author notes, ‘flawed’, ‘misconceived’ and ‘very badly applied’. And it has caused disasters which the European Commission then blames on its victims.

Pryce herself, in true colonial style, compares Greece to ‘a naughty child’. But the real villains are the agents of finance capital. Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Spain get called PIGS, but really PIGS should stand for Problems Instigated by Goldman Sachs.

Why? Because Goldman Sachs managed to hide the extent of Greece’s debts, allowing the EU to let Greece to join the euro, even though the country’s economy was clearly unsuited to being part of the single currency club. The bank is said to have made $500 million from its assistance.

Pryce writes that “I have been arguing for some time that Greece needs to be treated more generously.” But of course the EU took no notice: this is yet another example of the endless, futile calls for reforming the EU.

She writes of the 2102 New Democracy government, “Greece is in a position now where the new government has no choice but to implement reform …” This is the only kind of reform the EU wants – wage cuts, welfare cuts, mass unemployment, permanent slumps. Greece must kill itself for the sake of the euro. This is what the EU is all about - you have no choice, resistance is futile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
the book is useless. For example, on page 10, Pryce writes 'When the global financial crisis hit in 2008, Greece had nothing to fall back on and the adjustment has been extremely painful.' She offers no explanation of how the crisis affected Greece or why it was 'painful'. The whole book is bereft of such explanations.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In general, it is a good book. It explains the Euro crisis in a simple way and it is a very good read for people with no economics background. However, it does not add much to the knowledge of economists. It explains also well the way politics work in Greece. However, in some specific parts of the book small inaccuracies appear. For example in the description of the Greek sovereign debt crisis, the author takes a favourable position to the former Greek PM (who by the way is endorsing the book) and reproduces some of his conspiracy theories.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was really impressed by this book. It took a historical, political, people-centred approach which helped me to feel that I was close to understanding the EU economic problems that simply make my mind go blank when I listen on the radio or TV. Vicky Pryce's undoubted professional expertise as an economist who has worked with many of the key politicians is humanised by her personal knowledge and love of her country. I think this is an important book that should be widely read and could contribute to a more positive future
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book offers a general insight of the eurocrisis, and would be particularly useful to those with little understanding so far of the wider economic context. However, the author does not escape from the clichés of the greek subculture when describing her private-education school life during the junta regime. Bear with that rubbish and read the rest of the book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
To assess our European crisis & what's involved in resolving it, we have to understand its cultural & economic origins, as well as its current context. This book covers these aspects with unique intelligence & readability; the integrity & relevance demand 5 stars.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback