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The Greatest Tennis Matches of All Time by [Flink, Steve]
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The Greatest Tennis Matches of All Time Kindle Edition

1.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product description

Review

"I encourage you to read this book because Steve is one of the most insightful writers on the game that I have known and he really knows his tennis." Pete Sampras, Seven-time Wimbledon champion tennis player"

About the Author

Steve Flink is a tennis journalist who has covered more than 100 major tennis tournaments in his career. He is a columnist for www.tennischannel.com and the author of "The Greatest Tennis Matches of the Twentieth Century." He is theformer editor of "World Tennis" magazine and a former senior columnist at "Tennis Week." He lives in Katonah, New York."

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4983 KB
  • Print Length: 520 pages
  • Publisher: New Chapter Press (1 Jun. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008B9CIN4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 1.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,030,167 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Despite only receiving this book today I have already thrown it out! I read Flink's account of the 1970 women's singles final at Wimbledon and it contains so many inaccuracies and bias it is just not credible. Having explored it further it is obvious the book seeks to glorify American tennis players! Unbelievable yet believable! What is so sickening is that Evert in the preface says how wonderfully accurate he is! Utter poppycock! Just to focus in on the Court v King match he obviously hadn't reviewed the video before writing this piffle! I have a DVD of the whole match and Court won the first set with a wonderful backhand down the line and not across court as he states - one of many magnificent backhand passes she made. The only problem King had with her knees did not happen until the very end of the first set. when she knew she couldn't win! The bias against Court is outrageous and he is obviously trying to make more of King's career than it obviously was. It has been well documented that American players, led by King and Evert, have done their best to dismiss Court's magnificent record of winning 24 Grand Slams. They have said that the 11 Australian Championships she won were devoid of top players but she could only beat all those that entered. Meanwhile, of course, King could have won more Grand Slams if she wasn't SO busy reorganising tennis as she thought fit! She invoked gamesmanship as Wade, Jones and many others would testify to yet Flink paints her to be a visionary and great champion. It is because of his poor match recall and total bias and favouritism towards American players, in particular Evert, that this book is just not a credible piece of tennis journalism whatsoever. I wish I hadn't wasted time even ordering this book. If I could, I wouldn't give any stars at all.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is a fine way to look back over some great matches. It is not the most detailed as I feel there could have been more to say but if you are new to tennis then it may be for you. The other review is silly so do not be put off by the cover! Oh and that picture is not from Wimbledon 2011 as the other reviewer thinks...
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Format: Hardcover
I am sorry but Djokovic vs Nadal 2011 which I assume the front cover picture is of was not a great tennis match.

There is no way I would buy a book with this picture on the cover therefore and this relatively disappointing baseline slogfest match being vaunted within the book.

The greatest player of all time is Roger Federer and the King of Clay is Rafael Nadal. You really want to sell a book? You put these two on the cover - their "Dream Finals" will sell it.

Or you could feature the two greatest who have won at Wimbledon - ie Federer and earlier Sampras with the most titles. And other great winners like Borg for heaven's sake, John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, **Rod Laver** (why not a picture of him on the cover if you can't bring yourself to put Federer on the cover?) Roy Emerson......

Djokovic has had one win at Wimbledon and may never win again. He needs at least 3 wins before he should be featured in this way. There have been amazing matches over dozens of years, yet you feature an uninspired match on the cover with one of the players only ever having won once.

One can only assume you are cashing in on the 2011 sensation of wins that Djokovic had rather than considering what was "a great match at Wimbledon". At a quick glance this book suggests to me it is an eulogy about Wimbledon 2011 final and anything else comes way behind. Forget it.

**** ARE YOU SERIOUS? ****
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.1 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily holds the readers attention for its historical and specific content but did notice a number of inaccuracies 5 Sept. 2012
By tennis maestro - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Easily holds the readers attention for its historical and specific content but did notice a number of inaccuracies. On page 334 It was claimed at the 2003 French Open semi final between Justine Henin and Serena Williams that the Belgian won this match 64 26 75 which is actually the INCORRECT score line. Henin defeated the American 62 46 75. On page 348 It was claimed at the 2010 French Open, Samantha Stosur defeated Justine Henin in the quarter finals which is actually INCORRECT. The Australian defeated Henin in the fourth round. On page 429 It was claimed Novak Djokovic at the 2010 US Open nearly lost to countryman Viktor Troicki in the second round, trailing two sets to one and falling behind a service break in the fourth set which is actually INCORRECT. This five set encounter was a first round match. On page 430 It was claimed Ana Ivanovic become the first ever Serbian to secure a Slam singles title when she won the French Open in 2007 which is actually INCORRECT. Justine Henin defeated Ivanovic in the final to win the French Open in 2007. The Serbian claimed the title twelve months later in 2008. On page 457 It was claimed John Newcombe defeated Bjorn Borg in the 1974 WCT final in Dallas 46 63 62 63 which is actually the INCORRECT score line. The Australian defeated Borg 46 63 63 62.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loved the first half....second half - not as much. 17 Jan. 2013
By Duke Tennis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book talks about each of "The Greatest Matches of All Time" in 3 sections. What was happening in tennis around the time, specifics on the match and the aftermath. I thought I would be bored by the first section of the book that featured historic matches and players but captivated by matches that I'd seen with players I knew. The opposite was true. The first part of the book was spell binding. Unfortunately when we got to more contemporary matches that Flink had clearly seen himself (or watched on video) the match specific section was so burdened. Sometimes a play by play recap which is DEADLY in written format. I would have given the first half of the book at 6 on a best-of-five scale but the second half a 3 at best. Worth the time and money though...
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book for tennis fans 17 July 2014
By NG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's a book for tennis fans (or even freaks) which I am. My problem with it was that I was expecting more from it than basically just a almost shot by shot description of the game because that I can find in youtube (from the 70's onwards, of course).

But it's indeed a specialist book, written by someone that really knows and loves the game.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flawed in parts, but leaves you wanting more... 4 Feb. 2015
By Tail End Boomer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
There are a lot of legendary matches here, some historically well known and others dated by pre Open eras. The intimate play-by-play description of iconic event showdowns is a tennis fireside chat novelty. Plus the prologue and epilogue entries make for fascinating reading. Where it falls short is that two many other incidental matches are added as before and after filler when space could have been saved for more main all time ranked entries and the inclusion of at least a dozen of the other extras reserved for honorable mention. Also, an appendix of stroke classification grading is too short and limiting to encompass several generations of the racket sport. And in the match list, there is one ever so glaring omission in the 1984 John McEnroe/Ivan Lendl French Open final, a war of wills that marked Lendl's first Grand Slam victory resulting in an eventual head-to-head rivalry lead over McEnroe. If Mac had won that match, he might have had the confidence to add to his trophy case beyond his 7 Big Four triumphs and Ivan might have withered further to earn his first. All in all, this is a good tennis book despite shortcomings. The subjectivity of what is left out just leaves you wanting more.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars AMERICAN BIAS AND FAILURE TO GIVE THE READER ACCURATE FACTS 14 July 2015
By Teeliner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Despite only receiving this book today I have already thrown it out! I read Flink's account of the 1970 women's singles final at Wimbledon and it contains so many inaccuracies and bias it is just not credible. Having explored it further it is obvious the book seeks to glorify American tennis players! Unbelievable yet believable! What is so sickening is that Evert in the preface says how wonderfully accurate he is! Utter poppycock! Just to focus in on the Court v King match he obviously hadn't reviewed the video before writing this piffle! I have a DVD of the whole match and Court won the first set with a wonderful backhand down the line and not across court as he states - one of many magnificent backhand passes she made. The only problem King had with her knees did not happen until the very end of the first set. when she knew she couldn't win! The bias against Court is outrageous and he is obviously trying to make more of King's career than it obviously was. It has been well documented that American players, led by King and Evert, have done their best to dismiss Court's magnificent record of winning 24 Grand Slams. They have said that the 11 Australian Championships she won were devoid of top players but she could only beat all those that entered. Meanwhile, of course, King could have won more Grand Slams if she wasn't SO busy reorganising tennis as she thought fit! She invoked gamesmanship as Wade, Jones and many others would testify to yet Flink paints her to be a visionary and great champion. It is because of his poor match recall and total bias and favouritism towards American players, in particular Evert, that this book is just not a credible piece of tennis journalism whatsoever. I wish I hadn't wasted time even ordering this book. If I could, I wouldn't give any stars at all.
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