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A A Great and Glorious Adventure: A Military History of the Hundred Years War by [Corrigan, Gordon]
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A A Great and Glorious Adventure: A Military History of the Hundred Years War Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Review

Full of the fascinating might-have-beens of history BBC History Magazine Corrigan writes with knowledge and humor, especially in his footnotes, as he analyzes the battles of Crecy, Poitiers, and Agincourt while correcting myths often derived from Shakespeare. Publishers Weekly Bloodshed makes for entertaining history, and military historian Corrigan takes full advantage... Matches fascinating battle descriptions with accounts of how wars were financed and fought, as well as the Byzantine politics and mostly unpleasant personalities that conducted them. Kirkus Reviews The perfect book for those who know something of Poitiers, Crecy and Agincourt, but cannot recall their relevance, or who cannot quite put into context the role played by Joan of Arc. It is an unashamedly straightforward retelling of the history of one of the most famous wars in English history. Good Book Guide

About the Author

Gordon Corrigan was commissioned from the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst in 1962 and retired from the Brigade of Gurkhas in 1998. A member of the British Commission for Military History, a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Farriers, he speaks fluent Nepali and is a keen horseman. His most recent books include Mud, Blood and Poppycock; Blood, Sweat and Arrogance and The Second World War.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4164 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main - Atlantic ed edition (4 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CGNFC0M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #129,523 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I picked up this book written by a retired officer of the Royal Gurkha Rifles and enjoyed it very much. As an introduction to the Hundred Years War it is excellent. Being an ex soldier, he is very good on logistics and tactics and writes with a soldier's appreciation of the task undertaken by the English Plantagenet kings who crossed the channel in pursuit of their 'just rights and inheritances'. Indeed, at many points he conveys a longing to have been part of the campaigns of Edward III, the Black Prince and Henry V. However, for the informed reader it lacks the depth of a book such as, say, Agincourt, and really should be subtitled 'A Very Short Military History of the Hundred Years War' - coming in at just over 280 pages the whole thing. (That the deeds of the Plantagenet kings resonate with the French into modern times, he cites a standing order of General Charles de Gaulle that while travelling around the country he was never to be within thirty kilometres of Agincourt).

With regard to the lack of depth, indeed lack of scholarship, at one point he is critical of Henry V's offer to the 18 year old Dauphin to settle the dispute in 'trial by combat'. Pointing to the age difference as being unfair he calls Henry's challenge schoolboyish. Well, the Black Prince fought pitch battle at Crecy aged 16, Henry V took an arrow in the face at Shrewsbury aged 18 - and continued fighting, Edward IV won Towton aged 19 ... surely that is one of the reasons the English were able to dominate in the French wars: the French monarchs were seriously underpowered vis-a-vis their Plantagenet counterparts. It was only on the accession of a seriously underpowered Plantagenet king that the French were able to gain the upper hand and eject the English from their territory.

As an introduction to the subject it is ideal, but, as I previously stated, I can't see it fully satisfying the knowledgeable reader - hence 3 stars.
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Format: Hardcover
What was wrong with the French? Why didn’t they just let the English take over their lands? Why did they have to keep fighting? Why did they want to push the English back across the Channel? These are the puzzling questions that led English kings to keep crossing the Channel for over a century to try to get the French to let them rule. All they wanted was everything. Three million Brits wanted control over 16 million French. King after king led sorties and sieges - that succeeded. But the English never consolidated their victories by occupying and administering (until about 90 years into it). They swept through the land, destroying anything that was not sufficiently defended, and moved on, returning control to the natives who were left. Then they came back and laid it waste again. And again. This is the essence of the Hundred Years’ War.

It was made a little more difficult because of the Scots who had a treaty with France to come to their aid in the case of an English invasion. The Scots fulfilled their commitment by gleefully attacking northern England, and running away when the English came after them. Even the capture of their king didn’t stop them. It was a labour of love. And it kept English troops in the north, when they were needed on the continent. Eventually, the Scots fought alongside the French in France, such was their love of England.

The English had an advanced military strategy. They had banks of archers who did nothing but shoot arrows into the air – six per minute each. This resulted in a rain of tens of thousands of arrows that not only killed and maimed, but frightened the horses into rearing and fleeing. The English liked to set up where it was advantageous, dig holes and trenches to slow the enemy, and wait to be attacked.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Firstly,
this not my first attempt to get to grips with The Hundred Years War.
The other titles I have read left me confused and without explanation of they why's, who's, when's and .more importantly how's of the various campaigns.
A book with much humour and wit in the midst of quite often most sinister matters makes the reading of these often terrible events lighter but nonetheless informative.
Thank you Gordon..
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Format: Hardcover
of the Hundred Years War that I have read - and I have read several.

Corrigan writes clearly and entertainingly about a quite confusing period of history. As the title makes clear his focus is on the military but he does not ignore other aspects such as religion and social factors.

I think some of the comments made in the 3 star reviews are a little harsh. Corrigan does not pretend to write a balanced account of the conflict; it is intended for the general reader not specialists, and as such he does an excellent job.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Gordon in his own inimatable style gives a clear exposition of the Hundred Years War. For those who want to know about this period it really is an excellent and pithy introduction. For those that know then it's worth reading as well. Very highly recommended.
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