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The Great Armies of Antiquity by [Gabriel, Richard A.]
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The Great Armies of Antiquity Kindle Edition


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Review

"[A] fascinating and superbly presented documentary showcasing eighteen ancient army systems ranging from Sumer and Akkad, to the Pharaohs, the Greeks, the Mongols, and Japanese....A fact-filled, strictly logical analysis packed with amazing military history and insights from the ancient world, The Great Armies of Antiquity is a seminal and inherently fascinating history. Also very highly recommended is Professor Gabriel's early work: Great Captains of Antiquity."-The Midwest Book Review

"[A]n interesting and readable study of the world's great armies in the ancient world....Readers very interested in military history will find this volume excellent....Recommended. All libraries and levels."-Choice

"ÝA¨n interesting and readable study of the world's great armies in the ancient world....Readers very interested in military history will find this volume excellent....Recommended. All libraries and levels."-Choice

"ÝA¨ fascinating and superbly presented documentary showcasing eighteen ancient army systems ranging from Sumer and Akkad, to the Pharaohs, the Greeks, the Mongols, and Japanese....A fact-filled, strictly logical analysis packed with amazing military history and insights from the ancient world, The Great Armies of Antiquity is a seminal and inherently fascinating history. Also very highly recommended is Professor Gabriel's early work: Great Captains of Antiquity."-The Midwest Book Review

?[A]n interesting and readable study of the world's great armies in the ancient world....Readers very interested in military history will find this volume excellent....Recommended. All libraries and levels.?-Choice

?[A] fascinating and superbly presented documentary showcasing eighteen ancient army systems ranging from Sumer and Akkad, to the Pharaohs, the Greeks, the Mongols, and Japanese....A fact-filled, strictly logical analysis packed with amazing military history and insights from the ancient world, The Great Armies of Antiquity is a seminal and inherently fascinating history. Also very highly recommended is Professor Gabriel's early work: Great Captains of Antiquity.?-The Midwest Book Review

About the Author

RICHARD A. GABRIEL is a military historian and Adjunct Professor of Humanities and Ethics at Daniel Webster College. His most recent book is Great Captains of Antiquity (Greenwood, 2000).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5076 KB
  • Print Length: 456 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger (30 Nov. 2002)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000QCQHFE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,896,823 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars a gift 18 Mar. 2015
By shopper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a gift my grandson really liked it.
2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars misclick when setting the price? 28 Aug. 2013
By A. Laurentiu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I assure you it's not worth the money. I've only read a few pages till now and this is what I have to say:

The author has no idea what the current meaning of "compound bow" is. From the book:
"The bow underwent three stages of development, beginning with the simple bow, followed by the compound bow, and culminating with the composite bow. [...] The composite bow was a mixed military blessing. It could easily outrange the simple and the compound bow..."

The author doesn't use the international system of units. I don't want to read about yards and feet in a scientific work. Sadly, now I suspect that the scientific method is never applied in this one.

Comparisons are simplistic, for example the comparison between iron and bronze armor or the comparison between muskets and bows. If you're not going to make an objective and thorough comparison, why start it? He also doesn't specify the exact conditions from which the statistics are derived, therefore making them useless. He doesn't even try. What type of bronze, what type of iron, what's the composition, how was it forged, when, by who ...?

Pictures are worth a thousand words; how could he possibly not have used ANY? Is this enough description for the sickle sword: semicircular blade? What is a "kopesh"? Did he mean khopesh? Why do I have to google some of the weapons he describes in order to understand them, even though the chapter is called "WEAPONS OF WAR"?

This is all that comes to mind at the moment, I'm tired. Will go to sleep regretting the 90 dollars spent on this sub-mediocre work. I admit, I am not very intelligent and my English is not that good, but still I find it obvious that I've been pranked with this acquisition.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great resource! 6 Jan. 2013
By The Reviewer Formerly Known as Kurt Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I read a lot of books on ancient history, and I am always looking for books that are more than just vague treatments of their subjects. Well, this book really surprised me. The author, a professor and military historian, looks at various pre-gunpowder armies, explaining in-depth their weapons, tactics and military organization. It's a real goldmine of information on how the various armies actually operated, and why the interacted the way that they did.

My only real complaint against this book is that the author seems to hold to the old mistaken belief that in ancient times iron weapons were harder and tougher than bronze ones. In point of fact bronze products were superior to iron ones until the widespread adoption of the Bessemer process in the mid- to late-nineteenth century. This is evidenced by the preference for bronze canons shown by the generals during the American Civil War. What made iron superior to bronze was that iron was very common, while the tin needed to make bronze was extremely rare, resulting in bronze items being expensive, sometimes prohibitively so. (Resulting in the Israelite army possessing only two swords - those belonging to King Saul and his son, Jonathan!)

Nonetheless, in spite of this error, the book is quite excellent and contains a wealth of information. If you want to know how the old pre-gunpowder armies made ware, then this is a book that you really must read. I think it's a great resource, and I give it my absolute highest recommendations!
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Panoramic View of Pre-Gunpowder Military Institutions 21 April 2004
By George R Dekle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is the third volume of a trilogy. The first two installments were "Great Battles of Antiquity" and "Great Captains of Antiquity". If the first two volumes were as good as this one, the three books constitute an excellent but expensive reference work for pre-gunpowder military history.
Gabriel begins with the earliest armies of the Ancient Near East and exhaustively studies the armed forces of almost every significant military power of ancient and medieval times. He lays out the armament, logistics, organization and command structure, strategic and tactical doctrines, innovations, and political basis for each of these armies. Gabriel makes a strong case for the proposition that the only area in which we exceed our ancestors is that of technology. I was impressed by how much of what we think to be modern is of truly ancient vintage.
As good as the work was, I do have a few critiques: Gabriel made extensive reference to military depictions in ancient sculpture. Weaponry was described in great detail. No photographs or other adequate illustrations of either appeared anywhere in the book. The line drawings which were included did little to enlighten the reader. The work would have benefitted greatly from the employment of a qualified proofreader. Typographical errors abounded, but they were not sufficiently egregious that the reader couldn't cipher out what the author was trying to say. As good as it was, I'm not sure the book was worth the extravagant price. The best thing that can be said for the price is that "Great Armies" is the most inexpensive volume of the trilogy.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots of good information, but 30 Sept. 2008
By A.R. O'Meagher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I found the book provides a great overview for understanding various armies of the past. However, I have issues when it comes to believing a lot of it when the author doesn't know which century a particular year is actually in. I'm sure so much of the information is accurate, but this simple and consistent issue throughout the book tends to make a reader lose faith in the remaining content.
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