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The Grandmaster [Blu-ray] [2013]

3.7 out of 5 stars 90 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Tony Leung Chiu Wai, Ziyi Zhang, Jin Zhang
  • Directors: Kar Wai Wong
  • Language: Cantonese Chinese, Mandarin Chinese
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Classification: To be announced
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00HW357JM

Product Description

Product Description

The story of martial-arts master Ip Man, the man who trained Bruce Lee.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Could I give this six stars? I am astounded by the reviewers who gave low ratings - I realise we are all different, but it's a bit like the people who give low ratings to Sergeant Pepper or Mozart. I am just so grateful I discovered this movie. It is far from the common martial arts movie - it is art and cinematic technique, for example, rather than some excuse for gratuitous brutality or some hackneyed vengeance plot. It is not just moving and beautifully filmed and atmospheric - and, yes, with tremendously exciting fight sequences - it is something which you can appreciate when you know what you are looking at, because it is just so faithful to the techniques of the systems of wing chun, ba gua, xingyi, hung gar, taiji... It is a million miles away from those 70s movies which might mention a martial arts system and then just use it as an excuse for "Hong Kong Generic Movie Shaolin" fighting sequences, with no technical or historical respect for what they were talking about. This is an absolute gem, and especially if you know what your Chinese martial arts systems look like when they're used properly. But even if you don't, if you got anything at all out of Hero or House of Flying Daggers, or Crouching Tiger etc, then you should still really appreciate this movie. It costs about five lousy pounds! If it went out of production, so I couldn't replace it, I wouldn't sell my copy for two hundred and five pounds!
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Format: DVD
If possible, I'd recommend watching the current (2015) release on Blu-ray, for a better edit and presentation.
This isn't your typical martial arts movie. Nor is it an outright historical drama or a bio-pic or a philosophical debate or a political thriller or a lovelorn romance. The Grandmaster brilliantly blurs the boundaries between these genres so it's all of the above. And it contains some stunningly shot fight sequences which are both brutal and beautiful in the extreme.

The story is set in China and it starts in the 1930s when the country is invaded by the Japanese. Prior to that, an elder statesman of the martial arts has passed the baton to a younger generation, and in doing so attempts to draw the north and south of his country closer together. War disrupts his noble aim; his family legacy of a unique fighting style is threatened, and the inheritor of his title suffers personal loss, eventually fleeing to Hong Kong. After many years he establishes a martial arts school and a new form of fighting. And makes history.
That bare bones summary doesn't do any justice to the sweeping ambition and subtle beauty of this film. The fight sequences vary in length and intensity. Several of them - the rain sequence, the snow fight, the razor fight, the battle of the bread - offer astonishingly levels of choreography, skill and multi-layered meaning. The personal stories of the protagonists wrap several storylines into the greater plot, highlighting family honour, personal dedication and bitter loss against a backdrop of social and political turmoil.

The result is an intensely satisfying film, one which is far more arthouse than action-adventure. The timeline jumps around to cram in the passage of the years, and I got the impression that the English subtitles were skimping somewhat on the full depth of the dialogue. But overall this is a life story well worth watching.
9/10
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Format: Blu-ray
What are you looking for here?
An all action martial arts movie, or something more?
I hope you'll find this film is more than traditional fare, because it's a very different take...extraordinary - unique.

An episode in [and profile of] the life and times of Ip Man, the real and legendary grandmaster of Wing Chun around the middle of the last century, his trials and tribulations.
It is about love and the devotion to martial arts , it's not a martial arts action movie.
The lasting impression is one of the dedication, determination and denial that the students practice for their art.
A life of discipline - and perhaps, in this case, sacrifice.

In the leading roles, Tony Leung is at his best, Ziyi Zhang is outstanding and both are totally convincing as disciples and skilled practitioners.
But this is a Wong Far Wai movie - visually stunning and thoughtful.

Wong Kar Wai is a perfectionist, exacting director, determined to get what he wants out of every frame.
Time is nothing to him, the result is all.
And as a result this film is one of the most poetic movies I have ever seen.

So take a look with an open mind, to see it for what it is and not for what you think it might be, for this is the work of one of contemporary cinema's grandmasters.
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By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 31 Jan. 2015
Format: Blu-ray
This isn't your typical martial arts movie. Nor is it an outright historical drama or a bio-pic or a philosophical debate or a political thriller or a lovelorn romance. The Grandmaster brilliantly blurs the boundaries between these genres so it's all of the above. And it contains some stunningly shot fight sequences which are both brutal and beautiful in the extreme.

The story is set in China and it starts in the 1930s when the country is invaded by the Japanese. Prior to that, an elder statesman of the martial arts has passed the baton to a younger generation, and in doing so attempts to draw the north and south of his country closer together. War disrupts his noble aim; his family legacy of a unique fighting style is threatened, and the inheritor of his title suffers personal loss, eventually fleeing to Hong Kong. After many years he establishes a martial arts school and a new form of fighting. And makes history.
That bare bones summary doesn't do any justice to the sweeping ambition and subtle beauty of this film. The fight sequences vary in length and intensity. Several of them - the rain sequence, the snow fight, the razor fight, the battle of the bread - offer astonishingly levels of choreography, skill and multi-layered meaning. The personal stories of the protagonists wrap several storylines into the greater plot, highlighting family honour, personal dedication and bitter loss against a backdrop of social and political turmoil.

The result is an intensely satisfying film, one which is far more arthouse than action-adventure. The timeline jumps around to cram in the passage of the years, and I got the impression that the English subtitles were skimping somewhat on the full depth of the dialogue. But overall this is a life story well worth watching.
9/10
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