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Goldfinger Unknown Binding – 1961

4.4 out of 5 stars 124 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 223 pages
  • Publisher: Pan Books (1961)
  • ASIN: B001OPCHSS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (124 customer reviews)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you haven't read the original books, then you are missing out.

Easy to see why they became such a success.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Decent read
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Top Bond continuation book. Delivered very quickly.
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Format: Paperback
For any Bond afficionado this novel is a 'must read'. Fleming's descriptive knack with very few words is underestimated. The golf game is a masterpiece of its kind, breaking up the technicalities of the sport with an evocation of beautiful, peaceful England in high summer as a backdrop to the deadly intent of the game being played out against lengthening, afternoon shadows. There is plenty of depth to the plot and the background story of gold, delivered to Bond by Colonel Smithers of the Bank of England, is interesting in itself, particularly when viewed in comparison to today's money markets. The revelation that Goldfinger is not just an obsessive meglomaniac but also in thrall to the Russians is a masterly detail that gives real substance to the cold-war ploy to rob Fort Knox. The gangsters necessary for Goldfinger's purposes are deployed with a light, almost amusing, touch but none of the heroines have much empathetic appeal, not even the fabulously named Pussy Galore. The Masterton sisters are very one-dimensional. Jill is only there, really, to kickstart the second part of the story and, although Fleming tries to make Tilly interesting with her lesbianism, she comes across instead as 'neither flesh nor good, red herring'. In fairness, this is how Bond sees her when he deliberates patronisingly over her mixed up hormones. There are remarks about Japs and Koreans that would never make it into print today, but the joy of Bond is that he is so much a product of the 1940s and '50s, forever politically incorrect. I know many people love the films, but for me the books are incomparably better.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After completing a mission in Mexico James Bond is waiting at Miami airport for a flight home when he is recognised by Julius Du Pont who was there that night in Royale (Casino Royale). Du Pont requests Bond's help to uncover why a man called Auric Goldfinger keeps taking a fortune off him at cards. Bond unravels the scam and gets Goldfinger to pay up.

On his return home Bond is assigned to track Goldfinger as large amounts of undeclared Gold bullion is disappearing from the British economy. The Secret Service has been approached by the Bank of England to investigate and the belief is Goldfinger is helping SMERSH.

The story takes in a game of Golf, travel through the French countryside to Switzerland and the attempted raid on Fort Knox. Goldfinger maybe not the traditional Bond Villain but with his henchman Oddjob they make a formidable team.

The real problem I have with this is would Goldfinger have allowed Bond to survive when he he had the chance to get more than even? Getting all of those crime syndicates to work together?Then there is the females who feature. There is the Masterton sisters (Jill and Tilly) and how could Pussy Galore change like that?

The plus points Felix Leither makes a return in another well written book by Ian Fleming. But overall not how a Bond adventure should be.
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By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 May 2016
Format: Kindle Edition
I read the James Bond books through several times as a teenager, so re-reading one now reminds me of a time when I was more easily impressed and things seemed simpler and less ironic. It also highlights the changes (if not advances) in culture and attitude which have come along since the late fifties: thus, a modern reader can't help but be struck by the antediluvian views on race and sexual orientation that the author puts into his hero's head. Try this for size [p222]:

"Bond came to the conclusion that Tilly Masterton was one of those girls whose hormones had got mixed up. He knew the type well and thought they and their male counterparts were a direct consequence of giving votes to women and 'sex equality'. As a result of emancipation, feminine qualities were dying out or being transferred to the males."

Poor, confused, Tilly is one of two Lesbians (the initial letter is always capitalized here, which somehow gives the impression of something distasteful being held at arm's length) in this story. While she comes to an unfortunate (but, according to Bond's view, deserved) end, it turns out the other - the not-at-all ironically named Pussy Galore - was really just waiting for the right sort of man to come along and - literally - push the right buttons to turn her straight (and presumably save her from the debilitating effects of having been given the vote all those years ago). Elsewhere, Bond is careful to keep his prejudices unsullied by experience ("This Korean matched up with what he'd always heard about Koreans" [p113]), which naturally justifies him "putting [...] any [...] Korean firmly in his place, which, in Bond's estimation, was rather lower than apes in the mammalian hierarchy" [p181].
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Format: Paperback
My project to read all the original Fleming Bonds continues!

Published in 1959 Goldfinger is the seventh book in the original James Bond series. Yet again (as with Live and Let Die and Dr. No) we see Bond having to sort out an American problem; plus he offends most readers along the way, for example:

* Bond bemoans “giving the votes to women”
* Bond is such a man that lesbian Pussy Galore falls for him (the “cause” of lesbianism being child abuse or woman winning the right to vote)
* Koreans are sub-humans
* Avoid all homosexuals and Mexicans, and
* People who suffer with cleft palates are generally unintelligible

There are lots more examples of sexist, misogynistic, homophobic and racist passages, these are just the highlights (or lowlights). But like I’ve said in previous reviews that these books should be set into context of the time in which Fleming wrote them. I tended to mentally skip over them allowing me to enjoy Goldfinger as a thrilling and enjoyable adventure.

The book is almost like three short stories which Fleming glued together. The first “Happenstance”, concerns Goldfinger cheating at cards, next we have “Coincidence”, containing the extended golf match (more of which below) and finally “Enemy Action”, the raid on Fort Knox. While there are common threads running through the whole narrative it is at times a little wordy and sprawling. Towards the end of the book the suspense starts to dip and the story struggles a little as Bond seems to be more of an observer as opposed to an instigator or driver of the action.

The novel opens with Bond musing over life, death and how he fits into the world.
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