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Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness Hardcover – 10 Jul 1998

4.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; 1st edition (10 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767902343
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767902342
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 577,067 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

‘GOING TO PIECES WITHOUT FALLING APART is a daring and profound synthesis of intelligence about emotions East and West. This provocative blend establishes Mark Epstein as one of psychology’s most dazzling thinkers.’ Daniel Goleman, author of EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

‘GOING TO PIECES… is a soulful, intelligent attack on the Western idea of the self..’ Mirabella

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way.
Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds--Buddhism and Western psychotherapy--Epstein shows how "the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego's need to do with our inherent capacity to be." He encourages us to relax the ever-vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control.
Drawing on events in his own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a more peaceful and spiritually satisfying life. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Mark Epstein with examples from his own life and experience with his patients (he is a New York psychotherapist)gives a helpful guide to anyone seeking to understand themselves and to practise meditation in the Buddhist tradition. Very much a therapist open to his patients, Epstein tells of his own difficulties in finding out who he is and why he felt alienated and unworthy, and takes the reader clearly and carefully through a thought process which is readable and logical, supporting his argument with real-life stories and theoretical background from his teachers and mentors, who include Winnicott, Ram Dass and Joseph Goldstein. This is a convincing co-ordination of Buddhist and current Western psychology at a relatively simple and certainly helpful level.
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Format: Hardcover
Lovely clear and at times poetic presentation of the topic. Would recommend it to anyone who is on the Buddhist Path and those interested in exploring it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Absolutely loved this book an read it in a matter of days.
An inspiring story of how we could find inner comfort and help to overcome deep fears and everyday challenges.
Is an easy read that I really recommend to anyone that appreciate the value of Buddhist religion even without being a deep believer.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book starts of with a couple of useful insights into the Western way in which we seem unable to live with emptiness. Then, the author's psychoanalytic background begins to shine through and the author makes pseudo-scientific assumptions that would make Karl Popper scream from his grave. It's a shame as I've been interested in both the subject of subjective freedom and therapy for some years now.
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