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Godzilla 2000 [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

Price: £5.98
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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
£5.98 Only 3 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, English
  • Dubbed: French, English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00003CXLS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 45,772 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Godzilla returns to Japan and in no time buildings are being destroyed and there's a UFO polluting the air with its poisonous fumes. Not only that, but aliens intend to take over the world with a monster created from Godzilla's self-regenerating body cells.

After the awful US version, any Godzilla film was going to look like a masterpiece by comparison. This is quite an enjoyable entry in the series. It doesn't pretend to be anything other than what it is - a monster stomp-about - and Godzilla has a new design and looks meaner than ever. The film does suffer from some pacing problems. After a series of exciting early scenes, nothing much happens until later on when the, admittedly interesting, alien monster appears.

What really ruined my enjoyment of this film were the abominable english subtitles. They are so badly translated it's often impossible to take the dialogue seriously. There are such gems as "the weapon can punctual Godzilla's thick hide" and "a new empire will be borned". If you think they're bad, there's worse. Some of the subtitles make no sense at all. Added to that is a wobbly picture which makes the film look like it was recorded off some bootleg/pirate video cassette version. The film itself is a promising start to a new Godzilla era, but this DVD release leaves a lot to be desired.
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Format: DVD
Once upon a time, Toho actually killed off the Big G to make way for a trio of Godzilla films to be made in America by TriStar. Fortunately, 1998’s Godzilla proved to be more than enough of this American kaiju nonsense, opening the door for Toho to bring the real Godzilla back well ahead of his 50th birthday in 2004. Thus was born Godzilla 2000, the first film in the Godzilla Millennium series. So, you basically have to forget everything that happened in the previous twenty-three Godzilla movies, apart from G’s appearance as a monster brought to life by tests of the atomic bomb. Godzilla 2000 actually serves as a darn good comeback for the champ, who had never looked better than the mean, green, fighting machine he is in this film. With redesigned scales and a more ferocious mouth, Godzilla actually looks like the monster he’s supposed to be. The special effects are good, too – featuring a nice blend of the crappy CGI and “guy in a rubber suit” shots that I frankly expect and want to see in a Godzilla film with a pretty impressive extended boss fight scene at the end.

Godzilla 2000’s only real weakness is the story. We’re barely introduced to the main characters before Godzilla shows up and starts stomping his way toward energy sources, including a nuclear plant. The writers apparently didn’t want anything, including character development, getting in the way of their good, old-fashioned, Tokyo-stomping fun. Snippets of backstory are added to a couple of characters but are never developed at all. A larger problem is, of course, the English dubbing. Tri-Star actually forked out a good deal of money to secure this film’s American theatrical release, shaving off about seven minutes of running time and adding far too many classic American expressions like “Great Caesar’s Ghost” and “Bite me.
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Format: DVD
It's hard to believe there could be a worse Godzilla film than Godzilla 2000: Millennium, a reboot that heralded the beginning of the third series of films in 1999 with the big feller back on the bad guy team and returning to 2.35:1 widescreen after the second series was shot in 1.85. Sadly, that's about all the film gets right. It's almost as if there was no-one left at Toho who could remember how they were made. Godzilla gets a new look - not only is he toothier and thicker-necked but this is the first film where he is actually green (he's gray in the others) - but nothing as drastic as the gila monster makeover Hollywood gave him. He's still recognisably Godzilla, but without any of the old magic. A big part of the blame comes down to the man inside the suit, Tsutomu Kitagawa, whose movements are unconvincing - he just moves like a guy trying to walk normally in a big rubber suit - and who brings no personality whatsoever to Gojira.

At least he gets a great entrance, attacking a lighthouse in an homage to The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms, the lighthouse keeper following a boat that appears at his window to reveal it's firmly clenched between the big feller's jaws a hundred feet or so in the air. There are some fairly good moments in the early scenes as he makes his presence felt in the neighborhood, but after the buildup he's quickly forgotten. No-one really seems that bothered by Godzilla's reappearance, not because he's gone on the rampage so many times it's no longer newsworthy (which might have been an interesting angle to pursue) but because the film can't summon up much energy about anything. Even the human story is only sketchily filled in, more one suspects out of disinterest than an attempt at subtlety.
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By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 July 2015
Format: DVD
Once upon a time, Toho actually killed off the Big G to make way for a trio of Godzilla films to be made in America by TriStar. Fortunately, 1998’s Godzilla proved to be more than enough of this American kaiju nonsense, opening the door for Toho to bring the real Godzilla back well ahead of his 50th birthday in 2004. Thus was born Godzilla 2000, the first film in the Godzilla Millennium series. So, you basically have to forget everything that happened in the previous twenty-three Godzilla movies, apart from G’s appearance as a monster brought to life by tests of the atomic bomb. Godzilla 2000 actually serves as a darn good comeback for the champ, who had never looked better than the mean, green, fighting machine he is in this film. With redesigned scales and a more ferocious mouth, Godzilla actually looks like the monster he’s supposed to be. The special effects are good, too – featuring a nice blend of the crappy CGI and “guy in a rubber suit” shots that I frankly expect and want to see in a Godzilla film with a pretty impressive extended boss fight scene at the end.

Godzilla 2000’s only real weakness is the story. We’re barely introduced to the main characters before Godzilla shows up and starts stomping his way toward energy sources, including a nuclear plant. The writers apparently didn’t want anything, including character development, getting in the way of their good, old-fashioned, Tokyo-stomping fun. Snippets of backstory are added to a couple of characters but are never developed at all. A larger problem is, of course, the English dubbing.
Read more ›
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