Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.99

Save £4.00 (40%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

God's Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question--Why We Suffer by [Ehrman, Bart D.]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

God's Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question--Why We Suffer Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"Ehrman's clarity, simplicity, and congeniality help make this a superb introduction to its subject."--Booklist

"Ehrman, a prolific and popular author, has put his journey into words in a new book "God's Problem. ...Ehrman actually ends "God's Problem" on an upbeat note, a kind of call to arms for people to be good--to themselves and to others..."--San Diego Tribune

"[An] entrapped invocation of a God who is not believed in, but is nonetheless despised, is what gives the book a rough power. ...[Ehrman] is a lucid expositor..."--The New Yorker

Ehrman s clarity, simplicity, and congeniality help make this a superb introduction to its subject. --Booklist"

Ehrman, a prolific and popular author, has put his journey into words in a new book God s Problem. ...Ehrman actually ends God s Problem on an upbeat note, a kind of call to arms for people to be good--to themselves and to others... --San Diego Tribune"

[An] entrapped invocation of a God who is not believed in, but is nonetheless despised, is what gives the book a rough power. [Ehrman] is a lucid expositor --The New Yorker"

About the Author

Bart D. Ehrman is one of the most renowned and controversial Bible scholars in the world today. He is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and is the author of more than twenty books, including the New York Times bestsellers How Jesus Became God; Misquoting Jesus; God s Problem; Jesus, Interrupted; and Forged. He has appeared on Dateline NBC, The Daily Showwith Jon Stewart, CNN, History, and top NPR programs, as well as been featured in TIME, the New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and other publications. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. Visit the author online at www.bartdehrman.com.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 694 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0061173924
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books; Reprint edition (13 Oct. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00125OKXU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #283,306 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"If there is an all-powerful and loving God in this world, why is there so much excruciating pain and unspeakable suffering?" This first sentence sums up the "problem of suffering" that Bart Ehrman explores in this brilliant book. For atheists, there is no theodicean problem, because there is no god, loving or otherwise. For most theists, there is also no problem, but for very different reasons. Either it is simply ignored, or it's thought to have been solved, somehow. Fortunately for theism, it's easy not to think deeply about such a nasty subject, nor to wonder what is going through God's mind when he allows earthquakes and tsunamis to kill millions. For Ehrman, the more he thought about suffering the more devout he became, and yet the more he studied scripture as a "committed Christian", the more the difficulties multiplied. For example, many Christians believe we suffer because we have free will, but these same Christians "also believe in an afterlife" during which they will presumably still have free will and yet be free from suffering.

Even if it worked, this standard explanation "plays only a very minor role in the biblical tradition." The classical view is that "people suffer because God wants them to suffer", because "they have disobeyed him and he is punishing them." Most Christians today (as a result of secular morality) are a little embarrassed when a priest declares that catastrophes like Hurricane Katrina or the AIDS epidemic are actually God's way of telling us what he thinks of the gay lifestyle. Repulsive as such views are, the Bible backs them up. "On every level, disobedience brings punishment.
Read more ›
9 Comments 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
For most of us at some time in our Christian and/or religious life, our faith will inevitably clash with reason. That crisis between the head and the heart, is a struggle that I have experienced personally and have seen many people around me struggle with. One inevitably realises that things don't always work for good as the good old Apostle and the good book says it does.

Why do bad things happen to good and innocent people if an Omniscient, Omnipotent, and Omni-benevolent deity is on the throne of justice?
I have seen terrible calamities befall good innocent Christian brothers and sisters so it is a question that I have asked personally many times.

In this book, Professor Ehrman dealt with this issue admirably. He looked at all the angles, all the biblical examples and all the explanations that have been offered by various people over the years. He dealt with them one by one and offered us an excellent, lucid assessment and his very informed and well researched views and opinions.

This is a fantastic book, whatever your Christian belief or lack thereof. In the usual Ehrman style, it is well written, well thought out, and contributes substantially to knowledge.

I will recommend this book to anyone who wants to go beyond the dogmas and take a good objective look at what Christianity has to say about one of the most fundamental questions of our time.
3 Comments 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Having myself done a degree in theology and since "deconverted" (to borrow an Ehrman term!), I read some of Bart's earlier stuff whilst doing my degree, and have always rated him highly for his clarity of thought, his ability to express what he wants to get across, and his general approach to his research.

So when this new book came up on the upcoming list, I pre-ordered it, and it was delivered earlier this week. For me it was one of those books that you just can't put down, and I've devoured it already and am on the second reading at the moment.

The way he covers the topic is great - not too much information for the lay person, but also not lacking in clarity and detail for those who want it. It was almost like being back at university again, just brilliant. It is also refreshing to have him doing his own translation of the Greek for his New Testament quotations, which once again reminded me of doing exactly that at university, and once again re-emphasised for me how inaccurate the English translations are. As he mentions on one of the chapters, the pathos you get when reading the account of the passion in Mark in the original Greek is just not there in the English translation. So in summary, the coverage of the material is sufficient without being laboured.

His approach is to look at various biblical interpretations of suffering, and analyse their validity. He does this masterfully and the reader is left in no doubt at all what his opinions on the matter are and why he has come to the conclusions he has.

I can't recommend this book enough, both for those of us that have already de-converted and for those wondering about god in the light of the appalling suffering we see around us in the world.
Comment 75 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
God's Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question--why We Suffer

As always Bart Ehrman writes in an accessible and authoritative way.

Although he makes it clear that he is not a believer (although once was) this is not an attack on belief but an exploration of the different interpretations within the bible of why suffering.

Of all the books by Prof Ehrman i have read this seems to be the most personal and i think it gains from that. It would, i feel, be wrong to be dispassionate about suffering.

Whether a believer or not how to interpret suffering and our response to it is an issue for us all. This book is an excellent way of delving into this issue.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover