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God's Mechanics: How Scientists and Engineers Make Sense of Religion Hardcover – 9 Nov 2007

4.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (9 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787994669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787994662
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,459,713 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

Brother Guy Consolmagno speaks in the softest, sanest voice imaginable as he enters the current firestorm of opinion re science and religion. His engaging commentary exposes the mindset of a true techie ––but one who equates science with a sacred act. ––Dava Sobel, author, Galileo s Daughter

 

A prominent Vatican astronomer takes up the problem of presenting the Christian faith to his fellow techies. After analyzing their scientific modes of thinking, Consolmagno proposes ways of speaking to their mentality. His fresh approach opens up new paths for evangelization and dialogue.

––Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., Laurence J. McGinley Professor of Religion and Society, Fordham University

 

My grasp of technology doesn t much go beyond the chipmunks on treadmills that generate the electrical power for my computer. Put those chipmunks inside my brain, and you ve got an idea how much I understand about religion. Which is why I found [this] book so amazing. Brother Guy has a knack for taking extremely complex concepts and explaining them in ways even a technological and religious rustic like me can understand. He s smart, patient, through, and very funny. I only wish Brother Guy had been my science professor and my Sunday school teacher. I d have a lot fewer chipmunks running around in my office and in my head. ––Gary K. Wolf, creator of Roger Rabbit

 

Brother Guy Consolmagno s book explores the origins and nature of religion in novel and interesting ways, especially for a Catholic writer.  His insights and thought processes honestly accept and answer many religious questions relating to scientists, engineers, and contemporary society as a whole.  He is deeply candid, sharing his own faith and revealing his true love for the Catholic Church. ––Archbishop John J. Myers, Newark, New Jersey

 

Brother Guy is someone whose faith is mysterious to me. I′m an atheist, I think that God is a mental state we achieve by tickling our brains, not a creator who intervenes in the universe. Brother Guy′s book is an important step in bridging the gap between we the irreligious and anti–religious tech–world and the faithful among the geeks. ––Cory Doctorow, author. Overclocked: Stories of the Future Present and coeditor of Boing Boing (boingboing.net)

 

From the Inside Flap

In the often rancorous debates about science and religion, an interesting fact can often be overlooked: an awful lot of scientists and engineers are also devout churchgoers. How do they make that work? Brother Guy Consolmagno, Jesuit brother, scientist, and Vatican astronomer, offersa view that transcends the differences and embraces the connections between these two seemingly divergent world–views.

In God′s Mechanics, Brother Guy tells the stories of those who identify with the scientific mindset so–called "techies" while practicing religion.A full fledged techie himself, he relatessome classic philosophical reflections, his interviews with dozens of fellow techies, and his own personal take on his Catholic beliefsto provide, like a set of "worked out sample problems," the hard data on the challenges and joys of embracinga life of faith as a techie.And he also gives a roadmap of the traps that can befall an unwary techie believer.

With lively prose and wry humor, Brother Guy shows how he not only believes in God but gives religion an honored place alongside science in his life. This book offers an engaging look at how and why scientists and those with technological leanings can hold profound, "unprovable" religious beliefs while working in highly empirical fields. Through his own experience and interviews with other scientists and engineers who profess faith, Brother Guy explores how religious beliefs and practices make sense to those who are deeply rooted in the world of technology.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This down to earth survey of one man's reasons for faith is light and
fun to read but also profound and enlightening. This is the ideal book for anyone who would like to know what it is that Catholics believe and, in the present climate of mistrust, why that should makes sense to many people. The author is an astronomer and writing from the point of view of a "techie" as he calls it, a member of the scientific community. It is also a great book for catholics, to remind them of things they have been taking for granted. I shall be buying copies for all my children.
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Format: Hardcover
As a research scientist in a rapidly-developing field of engineering, I've taken a lot of interest in the "science / religion debate" in recent years. This book is one of the most refreshing books I've ever read on this topic. In fact, it is refreshing precisely because it is not really a contribution to the religion / science debate at all, but an exploration and explanation of how so many highly-respected scientists and engineers ("techies" as he calls them) reconcile their working lives with their faith. This book says much that I've felt for years, but would have struggled to articulate with anything like the wit, applomb and authority which Guy Consolmagno SJ deploys to such entertaining and enlightening effect in this highly readable book. It is a hoot of a book - really humorous and lively - and yet it is shot through with down-to-earth profundities - an impressive feat for an astronomer! While I'd recommend this book to anyone, I'd be particularly keen for Christians who are puzzled by the supposed conflict between science and religion to read this. They might not find all of it comforting: while Consolmagno takes no prisoners with the ludicrous irrationality of the anti-evolution brigade, he also takes aim at Christians in science who seek to explain the activity of God by reference to intangible interstices of quantum theory. "Some people never learn" is his sardonic conclusion on all attempts to create a 'God of the gaps'. Anyway, read it. I think it's brilliant.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well written, funny, with no flaws in the line of reasoning, which is what I had noticed for other books that deal with this sort of topics.
Very enjoyable for those of you interested in logics, science-religion, and in the intrinsics of why/how do people believe, regardless of whether they actually believe themselves or not!

The guy writting has an interesting background, from studying in the MIT, and doing a MSc and PhD about astrophysics, to working in the observatory in Vatican city.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most participants in the current debate about science and religion either know little of science, little of theology or, in many cases, not very much about either. Here we have a serious scientist with a Jesuit's training in theology and philosophy giving his contribution. That has to be worth a read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very clear and readable account of a scientist explaining his Catholic faith. His understanding of humanity and free will is the key to understanding religion and the existence of the transcendent
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