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The Goddess in America: The Divine Feminine in Cultural Context Kindle Edition


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Length: 207 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

An exciting look at the many faces of Goddess in America, from the indigenous and the imported, to the rewritten goddesses. Also covered: Goddess as perceived variously by American feminists, psychologists, shamans, Christians, and others. Highly informative and well written. --Jerri Studebaker, author, ""Switching to Goddess"" and ""Breaking the Mother Goose Code

About the Author

Trevor Greenfield is the Publisher and Publicist for Moon Books and an Associate Lecturer in Religious Studies with the Open University. He lives in Worthing, West Sussex.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2979 KB
  • Print Length: 207 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1782799257
  • Publisher: Moon Books (28 Oct. 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01LOWM1S6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #925,452 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly Written, Poorly Thought Out 19 Jun. 2017
By Chase Doyle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a mishmash of loosely connected essays.

Many if not all of the culturally specific essays are written by people who do not belong to those cultures. A little bit after an essay on not appropriating from cultures, this book features an essay by a white woman taking on Native American goddesses, while acknowledging that those tribes would not be happy about it and then talking about a singular Native American language.

Other essays misuse Christian theologians and theological terms. I understand what gender complementarianism is, but I don't think that author does because it generally doesn't apply to Wicca and certainly wouldn't apply to the goddess spirituality movement writ large.

If you want a book about goddess worship that lacks a general theme while also being, by turns, racist, misogynistic, classist, homophobic, transphobic, and generally ignorant this is the book for you.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 16 May 2017
By Sherrie Almes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful compilation of essays on the goddess.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Goddess as she is and should be in America 13 Oct. 2016
By Arie Farnam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Here's America's answer to Pagan Planet. which is primarily centered on the British Isles. The Goddess in America: The Divine Feminine in Cultural Context, edited by Trevor Greenfield, is an impressive anthology of Neopagan, Reclaiming and Goddess-oriented writers and it provides a valuable study guide for anyone seeking to understand Goddess-centered faith in America.

Right off the bat, this book passes the first, most obvious and most often failed test when it comes to looking at Goddess spirituality in America. That is it starts before Columbus... long before Columbus and stays there for a solid chunk of the book. Kudos to the editor for that. It isn't a stance without its critics and dangers.

The issue of the uneasy relationship between Goddess-devotees of European descent, Native American Goddess spirituality and cultural appropriation is addressed without any definitive conclusion. It's a sticky subject and there is essentially no way to satisfy everyone. Several authors weigh in on the topic in this anthology, all offering various versions of a moderate viewpoint: i.e. people should be free to honor goddesses other than those from their own genetic background as long as they do so with true respect and take the time to understand the cultural context of the goddess and give something back to the culture and community that the goddess comes from. Some authors have more exacting standards than others when it comes to correct respect but that is the general consensus.

The book continues with a variety of perspectives on the historical development and contemporary character of goddess spirituality in America. Again, the editor has heard the calls for more racial diversity in such anthologies and the authors represent reasonable diversity within the movement, including Vodun and Hebrew goddess perspectives.

The book is generally well written, excellently edited and interesting to read. Unlike some similar books there is little attempt to make it easy or light reading, however. The authors state their issues in all their complexity, which will make the book appropriate for university programs and other scholarly considerations. It includes several sections on pop culture, including an essay on representations of the Goddess in pop culture as well as the Goth movement, but these issues are handled from an analytical perspective, with respect for those who are part of these trends and yet without playing to a pop culture tune.

If there is any issue in which I feel the book is not fully representative of American goddess-spirituality it is in the emphasis of several authors on Reclaiming. My broad experience of the on-line world of American goddess spirituality shows that both formal Reclaiming groups and the general values and ideals of Reclaiming are much less prominent in America than they are represented in this book.

I personally love the Reclaiming movement, however, and I wish these values and ideals had greater sway in the popular goddess movement in America, so I don't take offense at its exaggerated influence in the book. I dearly wish more people today took social and environmental activism to the core of their spirituality and acted on the principles they profess. Instead I find a media landscape which deadens passion and ridicules those who stand up for their beliefs actively.

Thus to paraphrase a motto of the Society for Creative Anachronisms, this is something like the Goddess in America--as she is and should be. This book sets out not just to document where we are, but also to point a conscious way forward for the goddess community in America.

All in all this is an excellent anthology on contemporary goddess spirituality and well worth the read.

For more reviews of Pagan books see [...]
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars 16 May 2017
By Lisa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars begins with tackling the topic of cultural appropriation – a great segway from the first part of the book discussing ... 15 Feb. 2017
By Mat Auryn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a greatly needed book on the relationship between the Goddess and America and a fascinating read. The Goddess in America: The Divine Feminine in Cultural Context edited by Trevor Greenfield is an anthology of various writers. The book is divided into four main parts; The Native Goddess, The Migrant Goddess, The Relational Goddess, and the Contemporary Goddess. The Native Goddess touches upon the influence matriarchal focused native tribes have had on modern goddess spirituality and feminism. The following chapters discuss the Goddess within Cherokee, Hopi and Mayan cultures.

The second part of the book, The Migrant Goddess, begins with tackling the topic of cultural appropriation – a great segway from the first part of the book discussing Native traditions. Thought-provoking and difficult questions and issues regarding cultural appropriation by those in Goddess Movements is presented and left as an open question, without any concrete answer. This is followed up with chapters discussing “imported” or “migrant” Goddesses that came from other non-American cultures such as Ireland, Africa, Creole Voodoo, Minoan and Hebrew traditions and how this has influenced the diversity of Goddess worship in modern day America. The third part of the book, The Relational Goddess discusses the Goddess in relation to very diverse areas of modern American spiritual life; Feminism, Modern Shamanistic Practices, Christianity, Psychology and Witchcraft.

The final section of the book, The Contemporary Goddess discusses how the Goddess has influenced pop culture – often through veiled guises. Next how Goddesses have changed since coming to America is discussed, examining different retellings of myths, reimagining attributes and reinterpretations of the Goddess as she made her way to America. The Goddess in relation to the Reclaiming Tradition with its focus on activism is discussed by a Reclaiming Witch. After that the importance of modern day priestesses is explored. Next up the Dark Goddesses and their relation to the goth sub-culture is examined. The book finishes with my favorite entry by Vivienne Moss, which creatively explores and honors nine women in American History who are revered in this as embodiments of different types of Goddess-hood, being likened almost to modern day saints and includes ways to honor their legacies today.
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