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God & the New Physics Paperback – 1983

3.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Touchstone; First Edition edition (1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671528068
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671528065
  • ASIN: B0078Y28AG
  • Product Dimensions: 23.5 x 15.3 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,800,432 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3.8 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
Paul Davies, a professor of theoretical physics, has written extensively both for the scientific and the popular audiences on topics of current interest in physics and cosmology. In particular, he concentrates on issues to do with quantum theories, relativity and beginning/end of the universe issues.
In his book 'God and the New Physics', Davies continues a new tradition in which physicists particularly and scientists more generally write about their fields in philosophical, nearly theological terms discussing first causes, ultimate meanings, and the place of God and humanity in the overall scheme of the universe. Our understanding of the universe has changed dramatically in the last century, having been a fairly stable image for the past several hundred years. This has understandably made the philosophic and anthropomorphic considerations of the universe change dramatically as well.
'Science and religion represent two great systems of human thought. For the majority of people on our planet, religion is the predominant influence over the conduct of their affairs. When science impinges on their lives, it does so not at the intellectual level, but practically, through technology.'
Davies explores first the idea of genesis of the universe, exploring the intricacies of the big bang theory. This is a theory that has difficulties philosophically, that a purely scientific approach does not have an answer to, not least of which because it isn't asking the same question. Essentially, according to the big bang theory, the universe began as a singularity, essentially an infinitely small point from which all space and time (and all that is in it) emerged in an explosion-like phenomenon.
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By A Customer on 23 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
Absolutely wonderful explananation of modern physics. Davies does a fine job of introducing the many points of recent revolutions in that area. Now the philosophy/thoelogy, that is not so good. The man is a physicist and should stay one, for his arguments and analysis in general is lacking. It is not his conclusions that bother me, it is more like his thinking leading up to them. As an avid reader of physics, and a current philosophy student, I feel a much better job could have been done in bringing these two areas together. All in all, a good book, I enjoyed it. A subject that deserves further exploration and stronger, fuller analysis.
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Format: Paperback
This book does what good books do; it raises your ignorance to a higher level. Davies uses quantum physics and some bio-chemistry to explore topics such as free will, the soul, and the origin (and end) of life in a thoroughly readable way.
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Format: Paperback
I found this book fascinating. Although Davies states that 'Science may offer a surer path to God that Religion' he states this only because science with its rational approach to the subject may more readily be accepted by some than by faith. Davies does, however, finally state that although the universe may have been created in the 'Big Bang' by itself without any so-called 'Prime Mover'; that is, if quantum gravity acts in the manner that quantum physics works at the atomic level. Given this, he then makes the statement that the mathematics that describe the universe must have been in place for this to occur. Davies is of the same mind as Einstein here in that God would be necessary to create the mathematics that created the universe.
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