Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £10.82

Save £7.17 (40%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

God and the Folly of Faith: The Incompatibility of Science and Religion by [Stenger, Victor J.]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

God and the Folly of Faith: The Incompatibility of Science and Religion Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£10.82

Length: 414 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £4.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

Praise for the New York Times bestseller God: The Failed Hypothesis:

"I learned an enormous amount from this splendid book."
-Richard Dawkins, author of the New York Times best-seller The God Delusion

"Marshalling converging arguments from physics, astronomy, biology, and philosophy, Stenger has delivered a masterful blow in defense of reason. God: The Failed Hypothesis is a potent, readable, and well-timed assault upon religious delusion. It should be widely read."
-Sam Harris, author of the New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith and Letter to a Christian Nation

"Extremely tough and impressive...a great book...a huge addition to the arsenal of argument."
-Christopher Hitchens, author of the New York Times bestseller God Is Not Great

About the Author

Victor J. Stenger is adjunct professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado and emeritus professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Hawaii. He is the author of the New York Times best-seller God: The Failed Hypothesis, and numerous other books, including Has Science Found God? and Physics and Psychics.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1655 KB
  • Print Length: 414 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; Original edition (3 April 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C4B2GJ6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #463,676 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
One reason the so-called new atheism has so riled the religious over recent years is that it has dared draw attention to religion's dirty little epistemic secret, which is that in its religious sense "faith" refers to beliefs held without evidence. The religious, naturally, would rather not dwell on this point, preferring - while hanging on to the coattails of science for dear life - to portray their supernaturalism as a reasonable lifestyle choice. For them, the compatibility of religion and science is very important. For the non-religious scientist Victor Stenger, far from being the best of friends, science and religion "are forever irreconcilable" and in this tremendous book he takes on the religious scientists and theologians who think otherwise.

The title may seem provocative, but the idea that the religious kind of "faith is foolish" is more of a description than a judgement, if we esteem evidence. Like his fellow physicist Robert Park in Superstition: Belief in the Age of Science, Stenger distinguishes between the two very different meanings of faith (the non-religious sense being trust or confidence), a simple point that is often overlooked by theists and atheists alike. That beliefs are more reliably true when grounded in evidence is no scientific dogma but simply the result of long experience figuring out how the world works. Sensibly, Stenger does not dismiss religion as an entirely irrational enterprise or wholly disconnected from the real world. That said, while theology "is faith-plus-reason, with some observation allowed" science "is observation-plus-reason, with no faith allowed.
Read more ›
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book took me a long time to read because every paragraph was packed with so much thought and information. The compatibility of science and religion has interested me for a long time and I wanted to read Stenger's take on it. Stenger lays out his arguments clearly and in my opinion proves that science and religion, especially the Abrahamic religions, collide. For example, there's no God guiding evolution (i.e. intelligent design), and Stenger gives convincing evidence for it on the basis of the very nature of Darwinian evolution. People who insert God into everything really should read this book carefully, but unfortunately they won't as they don't want their faith challenged.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Victor Stenger writes with passion on the need to end our strange double-think on science and religion. Religion is not a harmless aberration but a positive 'folly' that causes great damage in many unsuspected ways - religious wars and genocides being just the most obvious. People who base their actions on faith cannot be reasoned with however stupid and self-defeating their consequent actions are. Stenger provides chapter and verse of the ill effects that faith still visits upon even highly civilised societies and he wonders at the ability of a few leading scientists to compartmentalise their minds into non-overlapping 'magisteria' in Stephen J Gould's terminology. However the book is not just an attack on 'blind' faith but a very informative description of our present knowledge in biology, physics and cosmology. He writes in a style that the non-scientist can easily follow and I have no hesitation in recommending the book to any who take an interest in science and civilisation.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Now that the New Atheist cause has started succeeding in converting people to a naturalistic way of determining truth, there are those who think it should now back off. And that the scientists who sign up to the cause should still try to reconcile faith and religion so that religious youngsters aren't put off science. The only problem, as the peerless Stenger shows, is that it's just not true.

Stenger's premise is that religion marries with science only if the claims of the major religions (e.g the need for a god to create the universe) are not scientifically disprovable. And they are clearly are disprovable and disproven, as he shows.

It's a book which deserves to be treated a leading tome on the subject, written by the best-selling Stenger, a New Atheist Titan. It's highly readable and informative.
3 Comments 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Many atheists counterpose science against religion, but they often just draw an over-simplified contrast between their methods or attack soft targets like creationism. Stenger, to his credit, engages with more liberal theologians too. He does not treat theists (of whom I am one) as idiots - unlike Dan Barker, whose Foreword seems to belong to a completely different book. Instead, he saves his strongest criticism for Stephen Jay Gould's view that science and religion are non-overlapping magisteria (NOMA). Science and religion may not be direct rivals - they are not trying to do the same thing - but there are significant areas of overlap between them.

Stenger begins by looking at the history of relations between religion and science. He argues against the view that Christianity formed congenial soil for the growth of science in the West, but he does not overstate the occasional tensions between them. He sees them as being in more conflict now.

He has biting criticisms of what he calls 'Quantum Spirituality', and stresses that quantum physics is not as mysterious as some people like to make out. On wave-particle duality he says that individual physical entities are particles and only groups of particles behave as waves. This would be a satisfyingly straightforward resolution to the duality if it is true, but does it really accord with the well-known observation that a dual-slit experiment produces an interference pattern even when single photons are fired one after another?

Stenger then moves on to cosmology, and the argument that the universe is 'fine-tuned' to enable life. He has discussed this in more detail elsewhere.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover