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Glamorama Paperback – Unabridged, 3 Nov 2006

3.5 out of 5 stars 78 customer reviews

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Glamorama
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Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New edition edition (3 Nov. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330447998
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330447997
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 530,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Glamorama is a satirical mass-murder opus more ambitious than Ellis's 1990 American Psycho. It starts as a spritz-of-consciousness romp about kid-club entrepreneur Victor Ward, "the It boy of the moment," an actor/model up for Flatliners II. Ellis has perfect pitch for glam-speak, and he gives nightlife the fizz, pace, and shimmer it lacks in drab reality. Anyone could cite the right celeb names and tunes; but like a rock-polishing machine, his prose gives literary sheen to fame-chasing air-kissers. He's coldly funny: when Victor's girl tries to argue him out of a break up, she angrily snorts six bumps of coke, stops, mutters, "Wrong vial," snorts four corrective doses from whatever she has in her other fist, then objects to a rival at the party wearing the same dress she's wearing.

You had to be there; Ellis makes you feel you are. But such satire is a very smart bomb targeting a very large barn. Models' status anxiety doesn't merit Ellis's Tom Wolfe-esque expertise. Glamorama gets better when Victor gets drafted into a mysterious group of model/terrorists who bomb 747s and the Ritz in Paris, wearing Kevlar-lined Armani suits. Oh, they still behave like shallow snobs, pronouncing "cool" as if it had 12 "o"s, but now when somebody swills Cristal, it's apt to be poisoned, to horrific effect, which Ellis expertly describes. His enfant-terrible debut Less Than Zero aped Joan Didion. Now Ellis has grown into a lesser Don DeLillo--and that's high praise. --Tim Appelo --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Ellis is fast becoming a writer of real American genius." -"GQ"
"His best work to date....He remains a laser-precise satirist but the wit now dominates." -"Esquire"

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Whereas I found `American Psycho' an easy and absorbing read, I found this much harder work. Although rewarding in the end it took a while to get into. The part on the cruise ship became confusing for me and I was uncertain at times when we were focusing on a real plot or not. I enjoyed the concept of the camera crew, always having your life in the spot life etc but then I felt it lost something. If you don't reflect too much and try to analyse as you are reading it then this is a great read. I found myself trying to link characters together and once all the pieces of the jigsaw started to fall into place it was as if one of them wasn't quite right and you had to start all over again. However, it is a clever thriller and you never know which character to trust. Your ideas are continually blown to pieces as another piece of the puzzle is unravelled.

I loved the chapters going down in number, like a countdown. But a countdown to what exactly? A new script, a new scene, a new conspiracy? Both clever and intriguing to read this novel rather surprisingly sucked me in and even though at times I didn't have the foggiest idea what was going on, I was in the full long journey. It's difficult to work out Victor with his change of surnames - can we change our identity so easily and become someone different? Or is it something new to hide behind, to prevent us from having to reveal what lurks underneath the skin? Bret Easton Ellis takes celebrity culture and slowly picks away at it to let us see what exactly goes on behind the images we see on screen and in print.

I've had this book lounging on my shelves for quite a few years now, (6 to be exact) and I finally decided it needed to be read. I wish I'd read it sooner!
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Format: Paperback
Pretty much all of Ellis' work should come with a health warning that it is not meant to be read, except by final year students working on the effects of post-modernism on literature. Basically this is the story of a male model, who goes to the right restaurants, meets the right people, and takes the right drugs. One major slip-up however sees him cruise-linering off to Europe, into the hands of a model / terrorist organisation, who are behind a massive bombing campaign. Can you say Der-e-leeect?
Actually when I first read this, I presumed it was Ellis writing something truly unfilmable, just because all of his other books had ended up on screen; the irony that Zoolander basically took this premise and turned it into something entertaining is... quite wonderful.
Back to the novel, you can never tell what is true, what is really going on, and what is real. There is no resolution (there never is with Ellis). His characters are cyphers, indicators of general malaise, empty shells, not people in themselves, or people who participate in cause and effect plots. They are designed to inform us that our souls are dead, and that there aren't enough drugs to fill the gap. They are not designed to entertain us, and that is the problem - Ellis' books aren't entertaining, are a slog to read, and don't provide any payback for reading them (unless you consider the bitter after taste to be worth the while). Therefore I simply can't recommend reading them to anyone, unless you are someone who is quite happy to be bored by the books you read, and read for mood, not plot. Because there is no plot because either nothing happened or hundreds of people were blown limb from bloody limb by model agency bombing attacks; and no matter how many times you read this book, you will never know which of these scenarios occurred.
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Format: Paperback
Whereas I found `American Psycho' an easy and absorbing read, I found this much harder work. Although rewarding in the end it took a while to get into. The part on the cruise ship became confusing for me and I was uncertain at times when we were focusing on a real plot or not. I enjoyed the concept of the camera crew, always having your life in the spot life etc but then I felt it lost something. If you don't reflect too much and try to analyse as you are reading it then this is a great read. I found myself trying to link characters together and once all the pieces of the jigsaw started to fall into place it was as if one of them wasn't quite right and you had to start all over again. However, it is a clever thriller and you never know which character to trust. Your ideas are continually blown to pieces as another piece of the puzzle is unravelled.

I loved the chapters going down in number, like a countdown. But a countdown to what exactly? A new script, a new scene, a new conspiracy? Both clever and intriguing to read this novel rather surprisingly sucked me in and even though at times I didn't have the foggiest idea what was going on, I was in the full long journey. It's difficult to work out Victor with his change of surnames - can we change our identity so easily and become someone different? Or is it something new to hide behind, to prevent us from having to reveal what lurks underneath the skin? Bret Easton Ellis takes celebrity culture and slowly picks away at it to let us see what exactly goes on behind the images we see on screen and in print.

I've had this book lounging on my shelves for quite a few years now, (6 to be exact) and I finally decided it needed to be read. I wish I'd read it sooner!
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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