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The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon Paperback – 4 Oct 2007

3.8 out of 5 stars 126 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (4 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340952385
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340952382
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 17.8 x 1.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 663,209 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Stephen King has been for so long the master of the thick blockbuster horror paperback that it is salutary to be reminded of the quieter writer of shorter, tighter stories that he also is. His new novella could hardly be simpler--a nine-year-old girl, smart and resourceful, gets herself lost in the deep woods when she strays off the path for a moment and struggles to survive with a little food, not especially sensible clothing and a Walkman. One of the threats dogging Trisha is her imagination--she is an smart enough child to know how much trouble she is in and gradually to personify the wasps, and midges and dangerous animals, as a God of the Lost. And that imagination is also her strongest resource--she has a baseball cap signed by the Red Sox pitcher Tom Gordon, which becomes her talisman. This is a story of almost pure sentiment and suspense; King has always had fascinating insight into the minds of children and a command of detail that makes him the ideal writer of certain sorts of shipwreck. The almost minimal material here--a single character, what she has on her, and deep woods--make this one of his most gripping and compulsive tales. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Vintage King (Independent on Sunday)

Moving, gripping. One of his best...A literary home run (Mirror)

Utterly compulsive, bears ample witness to King's mastery of his craft (Mail on Sunday)

King writing at his compelling best (Express on Sunday)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Writing from the point of view of a small girl is not an easy task for a middle aged man to achieve, but this is exactly what Stephen King tries to do in `The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon'. To a large extent I think that he actually fails to capture her voice and instead imbues her with too much experience and intelligence. The story itself is a compelling one as the girl in question, Trisha, is lost in the vast expanse of woodlands on the American/Canadian borders. She tries to survive her ordeal by imagining her friends and family as well as the titular Tom Gordon, her favourite baseball star.

The book has a very US centric feel as the baseball aspect dictates - this may put a lot of people off, but in my opinion Tom Gordon could have been just about anyone and the point of the book is not about baseball, but about a young girl trying to concentrate on something to survive. Another element of the book that does not quite work is the supernatural. Trisha drifts in and out of consciousness throughout and hallucinates - or does she? It seems to me that King felt he needed to add `horror' elements to keep with his back catalogue when the tale of a small girl lost is scary enough. The fact is that the supernatural elements of the book are the weakest. Despite my misgivings I could not help but enjoy the book as Trisha was a nice character and the single survival narrative did grip. With some added elements this could have been a great book, as it is, the book is just passable.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a sweet little story about a young girl called Trisha who becomes separated from her family in the middle of the Appalachian forest. She has only her Walkman for company and uses it to connect to the outside world, which keeps her spirits up as she desperately tries to find her way home. She is able to temporarily forget her ordeal by becoming absorbed in her favourite baseball team's matches on the radio, and her fantasies over seeing her favourite player, Tom Gordon, in the forest help her deal with her loneliness.
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Format: Paperback
i admit, i was only about 12/13 years old when i read this book for the first time, and it was the first 'adult' book i ever read-i stole it from my moms shelf because i had read all my books so many times already.
i LOVED it-i could actually really relate to that scared little girl in the woods (i was also a young girl when i read it so, yeah, duh). now that i'm a mamma, i can even, in some ways, relate to Trishas mother-hey, if i was in that situation, i don't know what i would do, okay? and maybe, just maybe, i would want some familiar comfort; maybe the worry would even exhaust me into sleep whether i liked it or not. i hardly think any one can comment on the realism of the events and how someone would react to those events unless that person has actually been through a similar thing, and even then everyone reacts differently.
i can understand why some people don't think this is Kings best work; it is slow at times (that's sometimes known as suspense!), the baseball is annoying (especially when you are a young english girl and have no knowledge of the game; 3 in 1 there) and it could have been written in less words, but really i don't get why people are saying King does a bad job of portraying a young girl etc....i think it worked just fine.
my mom actually told me this book was one of his more 'child-friendly' books, so maybe that is the problem.....anyway, 10 years on and it is still one of my favourite books (ever, not just by King)...i even went so far as to order a new copy a few years ago because i had lost the dust cover from my old one; i took the new dust cover, wrapped it around my old book and gave the new book to charity.
this is, in my opinion, the best King book, especially for young readers, with the exception perhaps of Rose Madder.
if i were ever stuck on a desert island, i would want this book, the Bible and a radio-pure joy (and pure terror!)
I RECOMMEND THIS BOOK!!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good read, unlike almost all of his recent, meandering junk. Little girl lost in the woods is the familiar premise, but King makes it work well by keeping it simple with a hunter/hunted storyline containing more realism than usual, along with a hint of strangeness to keep the tale interesting. Maybe he should write more of these shorter, less pretentious tales.
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Format: Paperback
My shelves seem to be weighed under with books - and at least two of them with King -so I was somewhat reluctant to read a story which the back cover described as having a basis in baseball. Ok I'd bought the book -I buy a lot - Im a collector. So it sat on the shelf for a while and every now and then I'd pick it up - toy with the idea of reading it and go on to something more 'substantial'.
Guess what? No big surprise - when I eventually got round to reading it I found I was once again drawn into Kings world - but with a difference. Tom Gordon has structure - simplicity and above all else a satisfying conclusion.
Too many of Kings books - much as love them - seem to flounder with plot and constructive endings.He seems to love the idea of the story but seem unable to resolve it for the reader.
This is why the short story is his medium in my opinion. He can plot and write vivid desciptions and not let his pen wander.
And this book is basically a novella - it deals with one very simple idea and works on it and grows it organically.
Sure it mentions baseball but its got nothing to do with the story which at its heart is about courage - fear and overcoming the odds.
You know what its about - so I wont spoil the detail. It's Kings best read in a long time - a mature read that made me -a 36 year old man - well up and almost - i said almost shed a tear.
Read it.
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