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The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by [Collins, Stephen]
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The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

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Review

"An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable."--Raymond Briggs

"It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read."--"The Times" (London)

"Collins' illustrations are lush, rounded affairs with voluptuous shading across oblong planes. Expressions pop, from the severe upturn where a sympathetic psychiatrist's brows meet to the befuddlement of a schoolgirl as the beard's hypnotic powers take hold... Rich, creamy art and playful paneling make for a fun read."--"Kirkus Reviews"

"An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable."--Raymond Briggs

"It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read."--"The Times" (London)

"As splendiferous as its title."--"Metro" (UK)

"Clever, funny, and beautiful to look at... Surely destined to become a classic."--Rachel Cooke, "The Observer "(UK)

"A gorgeously penciled fable. The pacing and page design are immaculate."--"The""Sunday Herald "(Scotland)

"Mysterious and often wryly funny....with precise yet soft illustrations reminiscent of Raymond Briggs. A visually lyrical modern fable that manages to be both utterly unique and eerily recognizable."-- "Library Journal
""Collins' illustrations are lush, rounded affairs with voluptuous shading across oblong planes. Expressions pop, from the severe upturn where a sympathetic psychiatrist's brows meet to the befuddlement of a schoolgirl as the beard's hypnotic powers take hold... Rich, creamy art and playful paneling make for a fun read."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable."--Raymond Briggs
"It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read."--"The Times" (London)
"As splendiferous as its title."--"Metro" (UK)
"Clever, funny, and beautiful to look at... Surely destined to become a classic."--Rachel Cooke, "The Observer "(UK)
"A gorgeously penciled fable. The pacing and page design are immaculate."--"The""Sunday Herald "(Scotland)

"I don't want to spoil it...[but] it's kind of Roald Dahl--it's very funny, dark, fable-like and about exactly what it's title says." --Linda Holmes, NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour
"Mysterious and often wryly funny...with precise yet soft illustrations reminiscent of Raymond Briggs. A visually lyrical modern fable that manages to be both utterly unique and eerily recognizable."-- "Library Journal
""Collins' illustrations are lush, rounded affairs with voluptuous shading across oblong planes. Expressions pop, from the severe upturn where a sympathetic psychiatrist's brows meet to the befuddlement of a schoolgirl as the beard's hypnotic powers take hold... Rich, creamy art and playful paneling make for a fun read."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable."--Raymond Briggs
"It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read."--"The Times" (London)
"As splendiferous as its title."--"Metro" (UK)
"Clever, funny, and beautiful to look at... Surely destined to become a classic."--Rachel Cooke, "The Observer "(UK)
"A gorgeously penciled fable. The pacing and page design are immaculate."--"The""Sunday Herald "(Scotland)

"Slyly exquisite...What happens over the course of the next 200+ pages is a dilemma Roald Dahl would have relished: The roiling anarchy of There erupts on Here--specifically, on poor Dave's previously clean-shaven cheeks--in the form of a great, snarly, twisting, unstoppable beard....If Collins is right--if, as he says, stories are necessary--then let's hope this wry young writer/artist has got a lot more lies to tell us."--Glen Weldon, NPR
"I don't want to spoil it...[but] it's kind of Roald Dahl--it's very funny, dark, fable-like and about exactly what it's title says." --Linda Holmes, NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour
""The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" has the tone of a playful fable, from the cracked syntax of its title onward...For a book about the liberating joys of disruption, though, it's exceptionally disciplined: Collins renders several hundred pages of immaculately ruled buildings and bean-faced people (and the fuzzy curlicues that interfere with them) in meticulous, microdetailed pencil textures."--NewYorkTimes.com (Sunday Book Review)
"With one hell of a title, Stephen Collins' graphic novel makes an immediate impression, and the interior contents are just as gripping as the name....It's a poignant parable about the value of individuality and going against the grain, presented with a charming art style that brings a smooth animated quality to the story without losing sight of the darker aspects of the plot."--"The A.V. Club" (Best Comics of the Year)
"Filled with elegant black-and-white sketches and darkly philosophical commentary, Collins's graphic novel details what happens when borders collapse and stories have no tidy endings."--TimeOut.com
""The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" is an artistic marvel, and that splendor heightens the emotion of the story. The final moments of Dave's story are incredibly inspirational, and The Bangles' "Eternal Flame" has never been used as effectively as it is in those pages. Whimsical, bittersweet, and visually stunning, this graphic novel is the perfect parable for all ages, praising the value of eccentricity in a world of overwhelming uniformity with the help of unruly facial hair."--"The AV Club
""Sublime."--"Popular Mechanics
""A book about loneliness, fear, and worry that still manages to have a small glimmer of hope nestled in amongst the burly titular beard...Gorgeously illustrated....It's easily the most engaging thing I've read all month."--"Panels" (Best Comics of October)
"[Collins'] art -- especially as the beard grows and pages full of regimented, small panels breach into 2-page spreads of swirling hair -- is sensuous and soft. "The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" is also a well-designed book, complete with two different finishes on the cover: a gloss on the white lettering and a velvety matte finish on the rest...It all works together to create a hushed tone, a kind of gentle melancholy."--"Paste "magazine
"More than adequately Kafkaesque...but the art is the real showstopper here. You can obsess over panel after carefully crosshatched panel for hours without feeling you've exhausted the book's possibilities. The black-and-white interior is rich with nuance and depth...[It] reminds me of the work of Aubrey Beardsley."--"BookRiot "(Books for the Bearded)
"This book is completely unique. Whether or not you read graphic novels, the title alone is enough to draw you into this one. It's a look at society as we know it, the way we look at the people around us, and the villain of the story is... a beard."--"Bustle"
"A moving and remarkably funny examination of conformity, safety, uncertainty and--yes--what happens when a man grows a beard so big that it threatens to smother entire city blocks....Discover: A compelling and funny spin on Kafka's "Metamorphosis.""--"Shelf Awareness
""Mysterious and often wryly funny...with precise yet soft illustrations reminiscent of Raymond Briggs. A visually lyrical modern fable that manages to be both utterly unique and eerily recognizable."-- "Library Journal
""Subtly menacing...[A] Tim Burton-esque tale for Halloween."--"BookPage
"
"Collins' illustrations are lush, rounded affairs with voluptuous shading across oblong planes. Expressions pop, from the severe upturn where a sympathetic psychiatrist's brows meet to the befuddlement of a schoolgirl as the beard's hypnotic powers take hold... Rich, creamy art and playful paneling make for a fun read."--"Kirkus Reviews"
"An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable."--Raymond Briggs
"It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read."--"The Times" (London)
"As splendiferous as its title."--"Metro" (UK)
"Clever, funny, and beautiful to look at... Surely destined to become a classic."--Rachel Cooke, "The Observer "(UK)
"A gorgeously penciled fable. The pacing and page design are immaculate."--"The""Sunday Herald "(Scotland)

Slyly exquisite...What happens over the course of the next 200+ pages is a dilemma Roald Dahl would have relished: The roiling anarchy of There erupts on Here--specifically, on poor Dave's previously clean-shaven cheeks--in the form of a great, snarly, twisting, unstoppable beard .If Collins is right--if, as he says, stories are necessary--then let's hope this wry young writer/artist has got a lot more lies to tell us. "Glen Weldon, NPR"

I don't want to spoil it [but] it's kind of Roald Dahl--it's very funny, dark, fable-like and about exactly what it's title says. "Linda Holmes, NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour"

"The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" has the tone of a playful fable, from the cracked syntax of its title onward For a book about the liberating joys of disruption, though, it's exceptionally disciplined: Collins renders several hundred pages of immaculately ruled buildings and bean-faced people (and the fuzzy curlicues that interfere with them) in meticulous, microdetailed pencil textures. "NewYorkTimes.com (Sunday Book Review)"

With one hell of a title, Stephen Collins' graphic novel makes an immediate impression, and the interior contents are just as gripping as the name .It's a poignant parable about the value of individuality and going against the grain, presented with a charming art style that brings a smooth animated quality to the story without losing sight of the darker aspects of the plot. "The A.V. Club (Best Comics of the Year)"

Filled with elegant black-and-white sketches and darkly philosophical commentary, Collins's graphic novel details what happens when borders collapse and stories have no tidy endings. "TimeOut.com"

"The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" is an artistic marvel, and that splendor heightens the emotion of the story. The final moments of Dave's story are incredibly inspirational, and The Bangles' "Eternal Flame" has never been used as effectively as it is in those pages. Whimsical, bittersweet, and visually stunning, this graphic novel is the perfect parable for all ages, praising the value of eccentricity in a world of overwhelming uniformity with the help of unruly facial hair. "The AV Club"

Sublime. "Popular Mechanics"

A book about loneliness, fear, and worry that still manages to have a small glimmer of hope nestled in amongst the burly titular beard Gorgeously illustrated .It's easily the most engaging thing I've read all month. "Panels (Best Comics of October)"

[Collins'] art -- especially as the beard grows and pages full of regimented, small panels breach into 2-page spreads of swirling hair -- is sensuous and soft. "The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil" is also a well-designed book, complete with two different finishes on the cover: a gloss on the white lettering and a velvety matte finish on the rest It all works together to create a hushed tone, a kind of gentle melancholy. "Paste magazine"

More than adequately Kafkaesque but the art is the real showstopper here. You can obsess over panel after carefully crosshatched panel for hours without feeling you've exhausted the book's possibilities. The black-and-white interior is rich with nuance and depth [It] reminds me of the work of Aubrey Beardsley. "BookRiot (Books for the Bearded)"

This book is completely unique. Whether or not you read graphic novels, the title alone is enough to draw you into this one. It's a look at society as we know it, the way we look at the people around us, and the villain of the story is a beard. "Bustle"

A moving and remarkably funny examination of conformity, safety, uncertainty and--yes--what happens when a man grows a beard so big that it threatens to smother entire city blocks .Discover: A compelling and funny spin on Kafka's "Metamorphosis." "Shelf Awareness"

Mysterious and often wryly funny with precise yet soft illustrations reminiscent of Raymond Briggs. A visually lyrical modern fable that manages to be both utterly unique and eerily recognizable. "Library Journal"

Subtly menacing...[A] Tim Burton-esque tale for Halloween. "BookPage"

Collins' illustrations are lush, rounded affairs with voluptuous shading across oblong planes. Expressions pop, from the severe upturn where a sympathetic psychiatrist's brows meet to the befuddlement of a schoolgirl as the beard's hypnotic powers take hold Rich, creamy art and playful paneling make for a fun read. "Kirkus Reviews"

An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable. "Raymond Briggs"

It's part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it's an utter joy to read. "The Times (London)"

As splendiferous as its title. "Metro (UK)"

Clever, funny, and beautiful to look at Surely destined to become a classic. "Rachel Cooke, The Observer (UK)"

A gorgeously penciled fable. The pacing and page design are immaculate. "The Sunday Herald (Scotland)""

Book Description

A book for anybody who’s ever had a beard, thought about a beard, seen a beard, not had a beard...

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 96329 KB
  • Print Length: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital; 01 edition (1 Aug. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00E5BU97Y
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #503,451 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I came across Stephen Collins' work in The Guardian Weekend magazine where his strips are a definite highlight, a skewed and absurdly hilarious worldview.

This sets loose the same wild imagination on a much grander scale, it is a veritable beast of a book.

`Beard' is essentially a dystopian parable set in the land of `Here', where everything is perfectly ordered and everyone has a blandly repetitive lifestyle. Beneath the surface for some though lurks a lingering, inherent nagging fear of the land beyond, `There'.

The writing and themes are wonderfully Seussian but much darker, the lands of 'Here' and 'There' rendered almost Orwellian. The pencil drawings are simple but have great depth and warmth. It is part graphic novel, part twisted bedtime story for older children and adults with a sense of wonder and humour. If you like McEwan, Banks, Steadman, Dahl, Larson, Coupland and their ilk you can't fail with this.
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Format: Hardcover
I can’t remember where I first heard about this book. What I can tell you, though, is that every time I’ve heard someone mention it, I’ve wanted to read it. Now that I finally got round to it, I’m glad that I did.

The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil is a modern re-imagining of the classic fairy tale, told through the medium of a graphic novel. It follows the story of a man who lives on the island of ‘Here‘, an orderly little place, and what happens when it starts to lose a little bit of its orderliness. At first, it happens slowly, but then Dave finds that a beard has started to grow… and grow… and grow.

Dave – and the residents of the island – do what they can to stop the onslaught of the giant beard, trimming and shearing and even getting the dog groomers in. But they can’t seem to stop its inevitable growth. And this is where I leave you hanging – I’m not going to tell you any more in case I give the rest of the story away.

Collins has a knack for telling stories – it’s immediately clear once you pick this up – and his haunting visuals complement the story perfectly. It’s definitely recommended from me – check it out!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm admittedly a graphic novel noob, and this book was a wonderful introduction to the genre. The scenes floated along with the aid of some clever prose and beautifully serene illustrations. I had a shave immediately after reading.
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Format: Hardcover
A hairless man called Dave lives in a place called Here
A place that’s safe, neat, tidy with nothing for anyone to fear
But something uneasy lurks beneath the quiet and calm:
A single tiny hair on Dave’s face that becomes a gigantic beard - and causes much harm!

The beard can’t be cut, it grows back far too quick
Becoming larger than Dave, much bushier and thick
It becomes enormous and engulfs the town, much to the Government’s displeasure
So a solution is decided, for desperate times call for desperate measures

Stephen Collins’ comic reads a lot like a Roald Dahl tale or modern day fable
Whose message is very obviously displeased with 21st century society’s staples
Of conformity and uniformity, an alleged dearth of creativity
That manifests very pleasingly in this book with excessive beardity

Because modern life’s no fun
At least not for some
Who want something different
From the everyday humdrum

Collins’ pencil art style is ambitious and charming
While the book itself is written with delightful rhyming
And at times it reads like a Pixar short
(Which is certainly a complimentary note!)

Because it’s a dark and unusual, original book
That any fan of graphic literature can’t fail to be hooked
With its unique imagery, style and tone
When Collins created it, he must’ve been in the zone!

And though it’s a hefty volume in page count and size
The narrative is enthralling and sure to mesmerize
For, despite its themes and critiques that, on the page, are quite clear
You can also read it as a simple fun comic – about a GIGANTIC BEARD!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have never bought a graphic novel before but I love his cartoons in the Guardian's Weekend magazine.
This does not disappoint; funny, touching....there are so many words I could use to describe this but you should check it out for yourself. The guy is a genius.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had a day off work this week with some class of cough and cold combination and spent the better part of it engrossed in Stephen Collins’s The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, a fable-like tale of a perfectly ordered world being disrupted by a sudden invasion of inexplicable facial hair. This is a comic strip book I guess, in that the story’s told via a series of beautiful and simple pencil drawings laid out in panels with spare rhyming captions providing quiet narration, but it’s got more in common with the writings of Franz Kafka or Kazuo Ishiguro than it has with anything produced by Marvel or 2000 AD. For the first half of the book we follow the daily routine of a seemingly ordinary office worker called Dave, who goes to work every day to produce bland spreadsheets and charts and then goes home to spend his evenings listening to The Bangles and sketching the street that he can see from his window. The town (actually, island) that he lives is in known simply as Here and is kept pathologically neat and clean and free from unsightly expressions of individuality but this doesn’t seem to be due to any oppression from above – it’s more to do with an underlying fear of the unknown, and the unknown is represented by There, the unruly wilderness that lies all around the island, just across the sea. One terrible day There finds a way to establish a presence on Here through a moment of uncertainty on the part of Dave and we’re thereafter shown the ways that the powers-that-be struggle to contain this unholy infection.Read more ›
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