Buy Used
£2.77
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Former Library books. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life's Origins Hardcover – 9 Sep 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£51.96 £2.77

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Henry (Joseph) Press (9 Sept. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0309094321
  • ISBN-13: 978-0309094320
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 16.1 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 340,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

Review

"Hazen writes with wonderful clarity about science."

About the Author

Robert M. Hazen is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the Clarence Robinson Professor of Earth Science at George Mason University. Dr Hazen is the author of man books including The Breakthrough, Why Aren't Black Holes Black and the bestselling Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy which he co-authored with James Trefil.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Putting it back to front, Hazen lists the three likely scenarios for life's origins: a chemical process leading to metabolism, a chemical process leading to replication, or a combination of the two. The remainder of the book is an exploration of the ideas centered on the way life was started on this planet and the researchers who have conceived or tested them. The list of scientists involved is extensive, but in this finely crafted work, Hazen is able to introduce them, describe their work - and his own - clearly and effectively. With the advantage of arriving at "Life's Origins" studies from an "outside" discipline - geophysics - the author brings a fine sense of detachment to this presentation.

In any other account on this topic, the opening would inevitably be a reference to Charles Darwin's "warm little pond". The "warm little pond" idea was tested in 1953 by Stanley Miller, who figures significantly in this story. Darwin's "first cell" clearly required simpler precursors to be assembled and put in operation. As an earth scientist, Hazen is more interested in the role played by chemistry and physics than cell biology, and so begins the book with water's changing properties under increased temperature and pressure. This situation plays a more significant role in life's beginnings than we might guess, since one scenario for the initial steps lies deep in the Earth where water, essential to life, lies buried in rocks, hot and compressed. As it turns out, that water is home to living things - microbes that may not reproduce for over a thousand years, as contrasted with the microbes in your gut that reproduce every twenty minutes.
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Robert Hazen has put together a wide-ranging review covering all scientific aspects of research into the origin of life on Earth. Questions of this sort, which are about particular events, rather than general laws, are often, mistakenly, held to be non-scientific by those who would have us believe that their particular poetic or religious insight is intellectually respectable. On the contrary, the processes of evidence-gathering, analysis, hypothesis-generation and testing, apply with equal force in the Historical Sciences as the General ones. Hazen reviews the alternative sources of evidence (from chemistry and geology to molecular biology), gives a gentle insight into the analytical processes used by the research teams working on the question of origins world-wide, gives due weight to the competing hypotheses, and holds the readers' hands through a number of experimental tests. He does an excellent job of balancing the need for accuracy and informativeness against accessibility. The text is very light on equations and chemistry, and any reasonably smart lay-person could easily follow his arguments. He takes the now-conventional approach of dressing up many of the chapters with slightly breathless first-person narratives, but doesn't overdo this to a dsitracting extent. For those wanting an up-to-date, yet accessible and wide-ranging account of this field, Genesis could not be bettered. For those interested in drilling down deeper, the index, bibliography and Notes sections are very well done. Highly recommended.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I have read several books about the origin of life the last frontier of science including Singularities by Christian De Duve and this was the best book by far it give us a comprehensive snapshot of "where we are" and come from a seemingly unlikely source: an earth scientist trained in mineralogy and crystallography.If you are interested on the subject just read it!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I highly recommend this book, if you are interested in getting an overview of the many hypothesis on how life may have started. The author provides a description of the ideas in the field, very much from a first-person view. This leads to a quite coloured view on many topics, but Deamer makes no attempts to disguise or cover up his stance. The author favours a chemistry-first genesis, which means that e.g. the much popular RNA world (information-first) hypothesis is reduced to a few chapters towards the end of the book. However, I think that Deamer argues quite well for his case. After finishing the book I was not tempted to choose one hypothesis over the other but rather I was left with a much broader perspective on how life *could* have emerged. In any case, whatever bias may be present in the book is more than made up for by an engaged story-telling that above all makes this book entertaining.
(The reviewer is a Ph.D. student in Biochemistry.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse