£24.99 + £1.26 UK delivery
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by babsbargains *** WORLDWIDE SHIPPING ***
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ReNew - All Discs are of Pristine Condition. Items Have Been Previously Owned but are Checked, Repackaged & Sealed to Prevent Damage. Guaranteed 24/7 Customer Service. Worldwide Delivery.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The General [DVD] [1998]

4.4 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews

Price: £24.99
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by babsbargains *** WORLDWIDE SHIPPING ***.
5 new from £24.99 10 used from £3.67

LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent The General on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£24.99 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by babsbargains *** WORLDWIDE SHIPPING ***.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The General [DVD] [1998]
  • +
  • Veronica Guerin [DVD] [2003]
  • +
  • The Wind That Shakes The Barley  [DVD]
Total price: £35.98
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video


Product details

  • Actors: Brendan Gleeson, Adrian Dunbar, Sean McGinley, Maria Doyle Kennedy, Angeline Ball
  • Directors: John Boorman
  • Producers: John Boorman
  • Format: PAL, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Aug. 2006
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000EZ3DVY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,836 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Crime drama about Irish gangster Martin Cahill (Brendan Gleeson) who became known as 'The General' after co-ordinating a series of armed robberies in Dublin during the 1980s. Hailed in some quarters as a folk-hero for his defiance against the authorities, Martin pulls one job too many when he steals paintings belonging to the Beit collection. With the police, headed by Ned Kenny (Jon Voight), closing in, Cahill's problems are multiplied by the increasing interest of the IRA in his activities.

From Amazon.co.uk

Best known for Deliverance (1972), John Boorman produced what is arguably his greatest film with Point Blank (1967). In that ambiguous gangster flick, set in a pastel L.A. wasteland, Lee Marvin may or may not be a walking dead man, animated by the desire to avenge his fatal betrayal by the woman he loved and his best friend. Many of Boorman's films take the form of quests, fuelled by some dream of utopia; on some level, Point Blank is the tragedy of a just man, appalled and ultimately defeated by the complexity of his world's corruption. The General begins with the death of Martin Cahill--celebrated Dublin gangster who stole millions during the 1980s--then literally reverses the approach and assault of his IRA assassin, flashing back in time, back through Cahill's colorful, criminal quest for his kind of ideal community. Boorman says his Cahill is a throwback to those Celtic chieftains of old who ruled by thievery and violence; as an anachronism, this charming, brutal bear of a man (perfectly incarnated by Brendan Gleeson) is undeniably reprehensible, but he stands in deliberate contrast to the institutionalised hypocrisy and corruption of church, state, and IRA alike. Brazenly hanging out in police HQ to establish an alibi; manoeuvring gracefully through perfectly choreographed heists; dispensing affection to his wife, and her sister; nailing the hands of a suspected cheat to a pool table; handing out food to women whose husbands are out of work--Gleeson's bluff, often comic gangster is always bigger than life, an eruption of unsocialized energy through the layers-deep sediment of socially acceptable sin. (In real life as in the film, Cahill always hid his face under a sweatshirt hood, or behind his spread fingers--he looks like some mischievous, giant-child.) Shot by the great Seamus Deasey in colour, then transferred to black-and-white stock, The General is visually voluptuous, the anatomy of a charismatic monster's soul expressed in lustrous light, silken shades of gray, and ebony shadows.-- Kathleen Murphy

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
The home of director John Boorman was one robbed by Martin Cahill, whostole, among other things, the gold record from Boorman's wall for"Dueling Banjos," the hit single from his film "Deliverance." That sceneis included in Boorman's 1998 film "The General," along with Cahill'sdisgust at learning gold records are not made of gold, and helps toestablish the idea that Cahill is an engaging rogue. Most of thatparticular task is accomplished by Brendan Gleason, who creates such alikeable character that when he nails one of his men to a snooker table toforce a confession, we are inclined to overlook the act of violence.
I checked out "The General" after watching "Veronica Guerin," in whichCahill's murder is an early scene. Ironically, both films begin the sameway, with the death of the title character. We then go back to the pointin their lives where the filmmaker begins to explain how they came to sucha violent end. Cahill starts off stealing potatoes and promising youngFrances that he will never be caught. Having been forced to break thispromise once he grows up to be man who plans on avoiding returning toprison by planning his robberies with such care than he is nicknamed "TheGeneral." But he also has a great sense of flair, which he demonstrateswhen his wife and mistress, who happen to be sisters, persuade him to buya house for 80,000 pounds. Then there is his habit of always wearing ahood or having his hand in front of his face in public so that his picturecan never be taken.
The Dublin police play into making Cahill look good by sinking to hislevel and well below. There is also the clear implication at the start ofthe film that there were complicit in Cahill's murder, although more by anact of omission than commission.
Read more ›
2 Comments 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
"The General,"(1998), a fine, Dublin-set gangster flick based on the life of well-known Irish gangster Martin Cahill, was written by (film script, that is), produced by, and directed by British director John Boorman (Hope And Glory [DVD] [1987]). It can only be described as latter-day film noir; it was theatrically released in black and white, is shot through with the darkest of humor, and does not end well for its gangster protagonist. It received a Boston Society Film Critics Award upon release.

The movie utilizes the flashback and frame mechanism, so we know its outcome from its beginning. Cahill (superbly played by Brendan Gleeson,In Bruges [DVD] [2008]), goes through the gangster's usual career arc: tough kid from tough project; increasingly successful, big, talk of the town thefts; finally, too high a profile, which is his undoing: he is, increasingly, seen as an enemy by the then very powerful Irish Republican Army.

Gleeson, a talented, flexible, very popular actor, though not a very good-looking one, may never have played lead in any other movie, although he's made many. But he inhabits Cahill, called "The General" by his troops, as if born to play the titular part. He's sure perfect for it physically. He's ably assisted by the also very popular Adrian Dunbar,(Hear My Song [DVD] [1991]), as his lieutenant, Noel. Sean McGinley does a memorable turn as Gary, one of the regulars.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 17 Oct. 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Gleeson plays an intresting character very well, reminding me of Rod Stiger. Visually great, editing as smooth as Gleeson's cheeks, based on a true story and told by a genius, you can't go wrong.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
The fantastic black and white photography and carefully structured narrative raises the 'Ordinary Decent Criminal', Martin Cahill to mythical status. The opening sequence is breath taking. The performances- especially that of Brendon Gleeson are stunning. Such a shame this didn't have a wider release before being remade starring Kevin Spacey. A must see!
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In a world which valued creative artists, someone would give John Boorman a couple of million quid every year and let him get on with making the movies which interested him. As it is, his personal films are fewer and further between, and the hackwork in between is best forgotten by everyone concerned. Still, we must be grateful for small mercies, since even a mediocre personal film by Boorman is going to be more interesting than most people's best. This is about gangster Martin Cahill, who once robbed John Boorman's Irish house. You don't get a more personal connection than that, but Boorman doesn't let any resentment get in the way.

First thing to ask is why the film is released in Black and White (though I understand it was made in colour). It's a distancing device. We're not going to be drawn into wholesale identification here. The result is that we're pulled in different directions by contradictory emotions. On the one hand Martin Cahill (Brendan Gleason) is brutal, ruthless and violent. On the other he is charming enough to hold the affections of two women, generous to his family, treats his men fairly (except where he tortures one who he thinks wrongly he is a squealer), and shows a fine contempt running rings round the Gardai, in the impressive shape of Jon Voigt. We get all the contradictions and we're invited to make up our own minds. This makes uncomfortable viewing, and it's not surprising the film didn't do brilliant business.

Martin Cahill is the product of a time and place; a sink estate at perpetual war with a police force as corrupt and brutal as any of the criminals. His rise and fall reflects the changing times. His gang is built up on the loyalty which comes from hanging together in good times and bad.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
See all discussions...

Look for similar items by category


Feedback