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The Great Gatsby (Penguin Modern Classics) by Scott Fitzgerald. F. ( 2000 ) Paperback Paperback

4.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GOH3SAW
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.8 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 269,635 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Will be dispatched from the UK. Used books may not include companion materials, may have some shelf wear, may contain highlighting/notes, may not include CDs or access codes. 100% money back guarantee.

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4.4 out of 5 stars
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great for a school project
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Format: Paperback
Whilst a damning indictment of the shallow materialism of the 1920’s, arguably this zeitgeist work is an even more effective treatise on reality and self deception.

Most of the main protagonists be they: the eponymous Gatsby, Nick, Daisy, Tom or Jordan indulge in self delusion and have been lured to the east by the hedonistic life style and bright lights of New York and Long Island. Each is ultimately left unfulfilled by the false hope and empty succour offered by the false reality that is the sybaritic, party lifestyle of the pre crash twenties.

Fitzgerald also telling depicts the developing influence of the motor car on everyday life and the growth of consumerism which has so come to dominate modern Western society.In the charismatic Gatsby we also see a prescient insight into the modern obsession with celebrities and fame.

This is both an intoxicating escape into the carefree spirit of the Twenties but also a sober warning against the worst excesses and hubris of mankind.
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Format: Paperback
It's been many years since I read THE GREAT GATSBY and I thought it was about time that I re-visited Fitzgerald. I had forgotten how much imagery, symbolism and allegory permeates the story being related by Gatsby's neighbor Nick Carraway, whose "seeds" of observation are the basis from which this story sprouts.

Since Fitzgerald and his wife spent much of their time post WW1 in Paris one can only assume that he was not enamored of what had become of life in the United States. Nicks depiction of the land between the two "EGGS" and New York City as a barren, grey valley of ashes may very well have been F. Scotts vision of American society in the 1920's with the haves and have nots obviously delineated........from the lavish parties thrown by Gatsby and the money spent on acquisitions by Tom, Daisy and Jordan , juxtaposed with the circumstances of George and Myrtle, put to rest (at least in Fitzgerald's eyes) the idea of the United States as a classless society filled with opportunity for all. Fitzgerald, however, does point out rather eloquently that for all their wealth and material possessions the rich are for the most part just as unhappy and dissatisfied as their poorer counterparts. Both classes are always waiting for the "green light" to pursue their dreams to acquire their hearts desire.

GATSBY is both a morality and a mortality tale of a Godless land in which "the eyes" (of society?? of God??) are always watching and the fear of living is almost as great as the fear of death. I'm glad that I ventured back into GATSBY territory because the passage of many years has opened these eyes to the greater depths of the story that I missed the first time around. Perhaps re-reading those "REQUIRED" books most of us found so boring in English Lit class would be a good challenge for each of us to undertake.
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By Mr. G. Morgan TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
One of the few essential novels, this is about the Jazz Age and all of America. Our hero, as presented to us by questionable Nick Carroway, a narrator oddly keen to tell us he's the most honest person he's ever met, is a man from No Place, still loving his first love, Daisy, and inhabiting a world of ease that he both epitomises yet does not quite belong to. It is a masterly short novel, simple yet packed with Americana; "of course you can" he opines when told you cannot have things over again; the Valley of Ashes stand significantly on the way to New York City which, " seen from the Statesboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time" and whose presiding deity is the giant figure of oculist T.J. Eckleburg - a nod to R.W. Emerson who pronounced the 20th would be 'The Ocular Century' (prescient or what?). So the affair plays out. The minor characters are delight: flighty Jordan Walker, cheat at golf whose bad driving depends on the care of others - shades of Ms Du Bois - to be safe herself; Daisy's awful husband, Tom Buchanan, a fascist boor and thug; Wolfsheim, the hood who allegedly fixed the 1910 World Series, wears a necklace of human teeth and marvels that Gatby's books are real; Carroway the ingénue, observing the truly worrying aspect of the tale "the foul dust that floats in his [Gatsby's] wake" rather than Jay himself. Often funny, pregnant with meaning and beautifully written, this is a must-read. Only one act in American lives? - well Gatsby gives the lie to that while establishing some modern myths of its own. Archetypal; a masterpiece.
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Book delivered in perfect condition at good price. I have nothing to say about he book's literary merit, which has been dealt with thoroughly over the decades by better qualified critics.
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My daughter needed this for school (A Levels) so hence I bought it. A classic tale as we all know. Good price and quickly delivered.
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Great author with another brilliant book!
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