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Future Israel: 3 (New American Commentary Studies in Bible & Theology) Hardcover – 15 Oct 2007

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 394 pages
  • Publisher: Broadman & Holman Publishers (15 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805446273
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805446272
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 2.8 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 936,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Barry E. Horner is pastor of Christ's New Covenant Church in Tucson, Arizona, and maintains a Web site devoted to the study of John Bunyan. He holds degrees from George Fox University (B.A.), Western Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary (M.Div.), and Westminster Theological Seminary (D.Min.)."

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
a most important book that clearly uncovers the latent antisemitism that resides in christendom today, the author goes to the roots of a biased theology that has sought to appropriate to itself the promises that belong to israel, the arrogance of a gentile church that dismisses the jews as passe is brought out very well, i recommend this book to anyone interested in the wellbeing of the church today, and the true place of israel and the definite role that it has both today and in the future, a very sound book, no sensationalism nor twisting of scripture to fit an agenda, but simply and clearly brings out where the church is going wrong, i hope many people will read it.
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Format: Hardcover
Barry Horner's work is long overdue from evangelicals. It is a deep and useful exposure of the roots of Christian anti-Semitism condemned in Romans 11.20. His range is broad and deep, encompassing and interacting critically with PhD/ThD theses and continental as well as American and British authors, including contemporary sources, whilst he ranges back to the reformers and Church fathers. His tone is usually moderate and analytical but his criticisms are sharp.

My main reservation is that he creates an identity between supercessionist anti-Semitism and amillienialism, as though every consistent amillenialist is bound to deny the validity of the land promise to unbelieving Israel. Tertullian (as the other reviewer notes) was a chiliast and a pioneer in anti Jewish polemic (see Nicholls).

I am also unpersuaded that Gal 6.16 and Rom.11.26 must be seen as referring only to Jews to provide essential antidotes to anti-Semitic supercessionism - on the contrary whilst strongly disagreeing with Hendriksen's views on the land, his exegesis here seems better founded. The glory of the Redeemer's kingdom is as Horner emphasises its diversity within unity, with a spectacular restoration of decaying Gentile hope through the climactic ressurrection of Jewish faith in Messiah, ('life from the dead') - is this not all Israel? The Jew first though last, and the Gentile first in order follows joyfully after.

His view that a reconstructed Temple could ever again serve a holy function is peculiarly dispensational - it could surely only be an accursed one (Mk.11,20 + context, 2 Thess. 2.4). That position represents a conflation of two distinct covenants just as marked as the opponents he criticises.
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By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
This extraordinary work delicately exposes Christian Antisemitism (although the author politely employs the term "Anti-Judaism"), relating the history of gentile usurpation of the heritage of the Jewish people. This mindset became popular with Augustine's amillennialism; reformers like Luther & Calvin accepted the doctrine of supercessionism or replacement theology and it has persisted in Reformed theology up to the present day. Jewish Christians are given a voice and the author holds the attitude of the Apostle Paul up as an example, in particular his love for Israel as expressed in the letter to the Romans chapters 9 to 11.

In essence, the book seeks answers from scripture on whether Israel as a distinct nation in its own land has a future according to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Those who learn from history already know the answer, based on the country's miraculous rebirth in 1948 and its survival against overwhelming odds. The aforementioned question is not a mere academic issue. There are those who still hold to the doctrine of supercessionism/replacement theology, often in a veiled form. They are contributing to the spread of the new Antisemitism as recorded by Phyllis Chesler and by Bernard Harrison in his book The Resurgence of Anti-Semitism.

Horner's scholarly investigation is excruciatingly detailed and steeped in the terminology of Reformed theology so that the lay reader may find it hard going.
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Format: Hardcover
'Future Israel' by Barry Horner is a study of an interesting and shocking topic. The history of anti-semitism in the Christian Church is undeniable, and Dr. Horner traces it well. He does show that some theologians, in all traditions, have used language that at least borders on anti-semitism. He shows that the New Testament as well as the Old holds out a future for Israel in God's plan.

On the other hand, there are some serious flaws in this work which I found interfered with my enjoyment of it. For example, Dr. Horner refers to 'Judeo-centric premillennialism' in the pre-Reformation period (which he covers in just over a page) without citing any examples. Since other scholars have demonstrated that Patristic premillennialism was every bit as guilty of replacement theology as Patristic amillennialism, Horner needs to prove his point. "We shall see..." he says, but what we see is post-Reformation authors It must be proven, not assumed, that those authors represent a stream that goes back before the Reformation. I welcomed Dr. Horner's expose of the platonic nature of the common understanding of heaven, but as he applied everything to the Millennium, I was left wondering what Dr. Horner thinks will come after the Millennium. Surely not a Platonic heaven!!!
Horner tends to ignore anti-Jewish statements by his own (pre-millennial) side, while I found no evidence that he had read, or was even aware of, David Brown's works that deal with the subject. In general his documentation of anti-Jewish bias in amillennial authors and in the wider Church is good, but he lets his own side off too easily.

Oh, and the indices are a total pain. There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason as to whether a name is placed in the author or subject index. And a line seems to be missing from the Justin Martyr entry in the index (as opposed to the 'Martyr, Justin' entry, which refers to a page not referenced under 'Justin Martyr' for some reason).
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