Furtwängler has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by momox co uk
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: From Europe's No.1 in used books & media articles.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Furtwängler Box set

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

Price: £26.88 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
8 new from £9.99 2 used from £8.99
£26.88 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Wilhelm Furtwängler Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product details

  • Conductor: Wilhelm Furtwängler
  • Composer: Anton Bruckner, Franz Schubert, Johannes Brahms
  • Audio CD (1 Nov. 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Membran
  • ASIN: B00099BQGE
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 363,969 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I make mention of the quality of sound here immediately in order to forewarn novices eager to explore the Furtwängler myth. There is very little appreciable difference even between the earliest recording here, the 1944 wartime studio recording of Bruckner's Eight Symphony, made on magnetic tape, and the latest, the excerpts from "Götterdämmerung" made in 1954, the year of Furtwängler's premature death. These are all clean mono recordings which will not satisfy the audiophile but remain very listenable to anyone who succumbs to the Furtwängler spell. I find the remastered sound here to be better than many another source I have heard, with hiss greatly reduced but detail mostly unimpaired.

His magic is palpable in these accounts. He clearly inspired his orchestras and performers to exalted heights: the sheen and glow of the Viennese strings, the gleam, energy and attack of the Berliners, the sense of soaring ecstasy conjured up by the Bayreuth orchestra in the Adagio of the "Choral Symphony" are testimony to his unique ability to pierce the heart of the music he conducted and achieve transcendence.

This Artone label series is clearly aimed at the aficionado who is tolerant of historic sound and discriminating enough to seek out artists who were in the ascendant fifty, sixty years ago or more. The compilation here is discerning and judicious, comprising seminal recordings of major works by composers with whom Furtwängler had the greatest empathy. The format of the series is a little awkward, being a tall, slim package that does not fit onto the average CD shelf containing a twenty page booklet offering an intelligent, anonymously authored biographical article in both German and English and four CD's.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Some legendary performances from Furtwangler here,most notably the Beethoven 9,and the Bruckner 8(he believed this to be the greatest symphony ever written),all in very decent sound.I am a bit of an audiophile,but make allowances for marvelous performances that are not of the highest recording quality,and such is the case here.These will never sound as if they were recorded yesterday,but so what?Greatness may be measured in many ways ,and one has to accept the limitations of the day,or forgo the pleasure of probably the greatest conductor of the recorded music era.In sum,an excellent bargain from Amazon Marketplace.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great performances, good sound for its age 13 Feb. 2011
By T. Fisher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This four-disc set on Germany's bargain Artone label has a lot going for it -- including one of the all-time best-loved recordings of Beethoven's 9th Symphony, as well as an outstanding Bruckner 8th and Brahms 1st. It's a great deal.

CD 1 is the famous (some are now saying infamous) Bayreuth Festspielhaus recording from July 1951. It is the well-known EMI recording, which has recently gained a somewhat sketchy reputation as not being completely what it had been advertised to be. It is not the unadulterated recording of the 9th played before an audience at Furtwangler's triumphant return to Bayreuth after his denazification trial, but a pastiche edited from the concert performance and the dress rehearsal for the concert. Still, it is widely recognized as one of the great recordings of Beethoven's 9th anywhere -- regardless of its provenance. I'm not sure I completely agree, but it is certainly a memorable reading. The 3rd movement is exquisitely slow without losing power, and the 4th has brilliant sections particularly in the finale.

The sound has limitations, but I actually found this recording better quality than an older EMI release in my collection -- a bit better cleaned up in spots where noises got in the way of the music. Note that EMI's new 2010 remaster from its new Furtwangler box set is very disappointing and rather than adding to the recording quality, actually lowers dynamic range a bit. You'll be very slightly better off with this recording of the Bayreuth 9th than with the new remaster and even some of the older EMI versions.

CD 2 contains Shubert's Symphony No. 8 in a recording with the Vienna Philharmonic from 19-21 January 1950, Schumann's Symphony No. 4 from 12-14 May 1953 with the Berlin Philharmonic, and "The Moldau" ("Vltava" in Czech) from Smetana's "Ma Vlast", with the Vienna Philharmonic on 24 Jan 1951.

You can hear an edit in 1st movement of Schumann at 8:31, where the sonics change -- a telltale sign they were recording the piece section by section.

I was unfamiliar with the Smetana piece, which is wonderfully watery-sounding. It starts with very fluid flute scales, and in a passage at around 3:15 there are string scales that give an effect similar to that in the Vorspiel to Wagner's Rheingold, when we are emerging from the depths of the river. The fade out track in about the final minute actually quotes liberally from the Rheingold Vorspiel. It's a very fun piece with remarkably good sound for its age.

CD 3 is all Vienna Philharmonic, starting with the Brahms 1st, also with remarkably good sound and a fine performance, dated 17-20 and 25 Nov 1947. It is billed as a "live" performance but if that is the case, it is obviously cobbled together from a few concerts but still fine overall. The disc is rounded out with two excerpts from Wagner -- ironic since Wagner and Brahms were arch-rivals during their lifetimes -- a Tannhäuser overture from 2-3 Dec 1952 and a Götterdämmerung Act I Prelude from 8 Mar 1954.

CD 4 features the only wartime recording in the set -- a Bruckner 8th, also with the Vienna Philharmonic, from 17 Oct 1944. This recording is featured on a number of separate releases (including this one) and this). It is an outstanding, passionate performance by musicians who truly felt the music, and is recognized as one of the top recordings of the work despite the somewhat compromised sound -- which is good for 1944 wartime mono, but doesn't meet modern expectations.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Anti-Toscanini 6 Dec. 2008
By Steven Peterson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Wilhelm Furtwangler is, in a sense, the anti-Toscanini. Arturo Toscanini was an exemplar of that conducting school of thought arguing for playing the music as closely to the composer's vision as possible. Furtwangler was more subjective (or romantic or interpretivist, choose your own word), following the "spirit" of the music. That is not to say that he ignored the composer's music, of course. Perhaps the apotheosis of his work is a recording that I once heard (many years ago). He was conducting the Berlin Philharmonic at a live concern in Berlin toward the end of the war. Much of this symphony was played at an achingly slow pace. Then, toward the end, the tempo became so rapid that it was almost unplayable. Some interpreted that as his effort to speak to Beethoven's concepts of human brotherhood etc. as opposed to Nazism. I'm not going to make a judgment, but it was an example of his approach to music.

This 4 CD set illustrates his musicianship well. The music of Beethoven, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Smetana, Wagner, and Bruchner appears.

A couple works illustrate.

Beethoven's Symphony # 9 (A concert performance recorded at Bayreuth in 1951). A couple facts at the outset. His version takes 74 minutes; Kleiber's takes 66 minutes; Toscanini's NBC Symphony version takes 65. At the other end, I think I recall that Richard Strauss once conducted the Ninth at 45 minutes (I cannot even conceive of that!). And, indeed, the First Movement is played very contemplatively, at a slow pace. The instruments come through cleanly and clearly and the orchestra does play well (Furtwangler was also not so big on heavy duty rehearsal).

The Fourth Movement also begins at a slow pace. As the Ode to Joy begins playing out, the pace is lugubrious. By the time the full orchestra takes up the theme, the face has quickened. The finale? It begins at the quick pace and ends at a manic pace (reminding me of my memories of that 1944 or 1945 recording of the Ninth). Across the four movements, the dynamics vary much greater than with many other conductors, although within a tradition of such conductors as Klemperer (at least that's my impression). To me, a nice illustration of what might be called a subjective or interpretivist view of music.

"The Moldau." He also conducts the Vienna Philharmonic in Smetana's "Moldau." And I can't resist the statistics: Furtwangler's version lasts 12:39; Kleiber's version takes 10:40 to complete). The orchestral playing is rich, with clarity to the sound. Again, slow tempos prevail throughout much of this work.

To conclude, Furtwangler's is not my preferred conducting style. However, I think that he is effective within the terms of his approach. As to the 4 CD set? It is very helpful as a rich, detailed illustration of the art of Wilhelm Furtwangler's conducting. In that, this richly deserves 5 stars.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five star performances in historical sound 17 Sept. 2011
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I make mention of the quality of sound here immediately in order to forewarn novices eager to explore the Furtwängler myth. There is very little appreciable difference even between the earliest recording here, the 1944 wartime studio recording of Bruckner's Eight Symphony, made on magnetic tape, and the latest, the excerpts from "Götterdämmerung" made in 1954, the year of Furtwängler's premature death. These are all clean mono recordings which will not satisfy the audiophile but remain very listenable to anyone who succumbs to the Furtwängler spell. I find the remastered sound here to be better than many another source I have heard, with hiss greatly reduced but detail mostly unimpaired.

His magic is palpable in these accounts. He clearly inspired his orchestras and performers to exalted heights: the sheen and glow of the Viennese strings, the gleam, energy and attack of the Berliners, the sense of soaring ecstasy conjured up by the Bayreuth orchestra in the Adagio of the "Choral Symphony" are testimony to his unique ability to pierce the heart of the music he conducted and achieve transcendence.

This Artone label series is clearly aimed at the aficionado who is tolerant of historic sound and discriminating enough to seek out artists who were in the ascendant fifty, sixty years ago or more. The compilation here is discerning and judicious, comprising seminal recordings of major works by composers with whom Furtwängler had the greatest empathy. The format of the series is a little awkward, being a tall, slim package that does not fit onto the average CD shelf containing a twenty page booklet offering an intelligent, anonymously authored biographical article in both German and English and four CD's. Always affordable, these sets are now available on Marketplace at a bargain price.

Purists may object to the inclusion of the controversial EMI recording of a supposedly live performance in Bayreuth which turned out to be a patchwork of performance and dress rehearsal. Despite the fact that the 1954 Lucerne performance, Furtwängler's last, remains the most desirable of all by virtue of more tension and better solo singing, and the frothing of the aforementioned purists in the grip of fits of manufactured outrage notwithstanding, this 1951 account is still treasurable in its massive dignity and conviction.

I feel more kindly disposed now than when I originally reviewed it on the Naxos disc towards the performance of Schubert's "Unfinished" here, although I still find the second movement a little stolid. The Schumann is unparalleled in its drive and propulsiveness, the "Moldau" slow but exquisitely sculpted, the Brahms suitably titanic, the Wagner orchestral excerpts justly esteemed for their sonorous nobility. The Bruckner best illustrates Furtwängler's sureness of touch when manipulating tectonic plates of broad melodies and arching structures; the only other conductor I know to rival his grasp of symphonic architecture is Klaus Tennstedt.

Anyone keen to sample the Furtwängler legacy could do far worse than start with this economical and representative Artone anthology.
4.0 out of 5 stars There are some very fine performances on this set and the sound is good 10 Nov. 2014
By Mystery Mann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There are some very fine performances on this set and the sound is good. First there is the Beethoven 9TH from the 1951 Bayreuth Festival. This appears to be the same performance that EMI has released for so many years. All I will say about this is it is Beethoven's music and it is Furtwangler conducting. There is also a fine Brahms 1ST, a live Bruckner 8TH, other music by Schubert, Schumann, Smetana and Wagner. The sound of all these is quite fine, unusual for a low budget release like this. All of this material has been released elsewhere so shop carefully.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback