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Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Audio CD – Audiobook, 1 Oct 2006

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: HarperAudio; Una Rev Ex edition (1 Oct. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061238538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061238536
  • Product Dimensions: 14.9 x 13.3 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,452,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Freakonomics was the 'It' book of 2005." -- Fort Worth Star-Telegram

"Hard to resist." -- Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"The guy is interesting!" -- Washington Post Book World

"Levitt is a number cruncher extraordinaire." -- Philadelphia Daily News

"Provocative. eye-popping." -- New York Times Book Review: Inside the List

"The trivia alone is worth the cover price." -- New York Times Book Review

"A showcase for Levitt's intriguing explorations into a number of disparate topics.... There's plenty of fun to be had."--Salon.com

"The trivia alone is worth the cover price."--New York Times Book Review

"Freakonomics is politically incorrect in the best, most essential way.... This is bracing fun of the highest order."--Kurt Andersen, host of public radio's Studio 360 and author of Turn of the Century

"Levitt is a number cruncher extraordinaire."--Philadelphia Daily News

"An easy, funny read. Many unsolvable problems the Americans have could be solved with simple means."--Business World

"Levitt dissects complex real-world phenomena, e.g. baby-naming patterns and Sumo wrestling, with an economist's laser."--San Diego Union-Tribune

"The guy is interesting!"--Washington Post Book World

"One of the decade's most intelligent and provocative books."--The Daily Standard

"The funkiest study of statistical mechanics ever by a world-renowned economist... Eye-opening and sometimes eye-popping"--Entertainment Weekly

"An eye-opening, and most interesting, approach to the world."--Kirkus Reviews

"Levitt is one of the most notorious economists of our age."--Financial Times

"An unconventional economist defies conventional wisdom."--Associated Press

"Economics is not widely considered to be one of the sexier sciences.... Steven D. Levitt will change some minds."--Amazon.com

"Freakonomics challenges conventional wisdom and makes for fun reading."--Book Sense Picks and Notables

"If Indiana Jones were an economist, he'd be Steven Levitt... Criticizing Freakonomics would be like criticizing a hot fudge sundae."--Wall Street Journal

"Principles of economics are used to examine daily life in this fun read."--People: Great Reads

"Steven Levitt has the most interesting mind in America... Prepare to be dazzled."--Malcolm Gladwell, author of Blink and The Tipping Point

"Provocative... eye-popping."--New York Times Book Review: Inside the List

"Hard to resist."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Freakonomics was the 'It' book of 2005."--Fort Worth Star-Telegram

If Indiana Jones were an economist, he d be Steven Levitt Criticizing Freakonomics would be like criticizing a hot fudge sundae. --Wall Street Journal"

Provocative eye-popping. --New York Times Book Review: Inside the List"

The guy is interesting! --Washington Post Book World"

The funkiest study of statistical mechanics ever by a world-renowned economist... Eye-opening and sometimes eye-popping --Entertainment Weekly"

Steven Levitt has the most interesting mind in America... Prepare to be dazzled. --Malcolm Gladwell, author of Blink and The Tipping Point"

Principles of economics are used to examine daily life in this fun read. --People: Great Reads"

Levitt dissects complex real-world phenomena, e.g. baby-naming patterns and Sumo wrestling, with an economist s laser. --San Diego Union-Tribune"

Levitt is a number cruncher extraordinaire. --Philadelphia Daily News"

Levitt is one of the most notorious economists of our age. --Financial Times"

Hard to resist. --Publishers Weekly (starred review)"

Freakonomics is politically incorrect in the best, most essential way.... This is bracing fun of the highest order. --Kurt Andersen, host of public radio's Studio 360 and author of Turn of the Century"

Freakonomics was the It book of 2005. --Fort Worth Star-Telegram"

An eye-opening, and most interesting, approach to the world. --Kirkus Reviews"

An unconventional economist defies conventional wisdom. --Associated Press"

A showcase for Levitt s intriguing explorations into a number of disparate topics . There s plenty of fun to be had. --Salon.com"

One of the decade s most intelligent and provocative books. --The Daily Standard"

Freakonomics challenges conventional wisdom and makes for fun reading. --Book Sense Picks and Notables"

The trivia alone is worth the cover price. --New York Times Book Review"

An easy, funny read. Many unsolvable problems the Americans have could be solved with simple means. --Business World"

Economics is not widely considered to be one of the sexier sciences.... Steven D. Levitt will change some minds. --Amazon.com" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

STEVEN LEVITT is a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and an editor of The Journal of Political Economy. In January 2004 the American Economic Association awarded him the John Bates Clark medal, a prize honouring the economist under 40 who made the greatest contribution to the discipline.

Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He quit his first career as an almost rock star to become a writer. He has since taught English at Columbia, worked for The New York Times, and published three non-Freakonomics books. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
First must state that this reviewer is not an economist, and usually find such books can often be boring. Must admit that this book kept me up far too late one recent weekend reading it through to the end. It was hard to put down.

Another reader/reviewer emailed me, noting that Malcolm Gladwell had said that Steven Levitt "has the most interesting mind in America," and since I had found Gladwell's "Blink!" hard to put down, I might find "Freakonomics" interesting. This was an understatement.

Then another friend loaned me a copy of the book, so I felt obligated to read it. Now I'll have to get my own copy, for it's worth a second read.

As noted above, the cover says it all. "Freakonomics" is not only humorous in places, it's fascinating, an out of the ordinary way of looking at economics for those who normally don't venture into what is often perceived as a boring subject. Like Gladwell's writing, this reviewer found this book to be a springboard to other ideas.

The authors define economics as "the study of incentives" early in the first chapter, which is not exactly as I remember the conventional definition from college courses. But maybe analyzing how to motivate people to do or not do a particular things is a better way or looking at the reality of economics.

"Freakonomics" was co-written by the noted journalist Stephen Dubner ("Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper"), and seems to have drawn as much criticism as it has received praise from reviewers and other commentators. The authors repeatedly state that there's no consistent theme. Others have noted that it appears to be an assembly of magazine articles and columns, edited and put together in an appealing but not particularly interrelated manner.
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Format: Paperback
'Freakonomics' is a witty, irreverent book for individuals who have never been and will never be Economics theorists. It's at once hilarious and serious about applying principles of Economics to real life scenarios, and it's just so much fun to read!

Let's start by saying, don't let the title scare you. I know most people pretty much despise anything to do with Economics, and anyone with a "respectable" connection to Economics would turn a nose up at this book. But with chapters like: The Ku Klux Klan and Real Estate Agents; Schoolteachers and Sumo Wrestlers; and Drug Dealers Living with Their Moms- I mean how awful can it be? Steven D. Levitt teaches Economics at the University of Chicago, so he is absolutely qualified to make the relational comparisons he makes, thus actually giving we Economics neophytes something to chew on. In other words, if my Economics classes in college were like this, I might have actually learned something! But seriously, 'Freaknomics' delves into how things actually are all intertwined, no matter how absurd. It's premise is that conventionally held beliefs may not always be what they seem, and many things that seem wholly apart from each other are inter-related. Other than just laughing and enjoying the witty banter of the authors, I feel like I truly learned some things, and it gave me food for thought on other issues. The chapter entitled "A Roshanda by Any Other Name" was just pitch perfect, and the chapter on parenting makes you realize that we really don't need all those parenting books after all.

'Freakonomics' is deftly written for novices and easy to read, with each chapter being basically a lesson unto itself.
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Format: Paperback
Most of the contents of the book have been discussed in other reviews, so I won't repeat it. I got this book as a present and it isn't the sort of thing I would usually read, but I'm really glad I did. It's a fun description of a number of studies that use tools from economics to examine real-world problems. There is little technical content but there is enough explanation to make a non-economist understand the basic idea behind the work. The conclusions are even more interesting and I would definitely recommend that you read them for yourself. My one criticism is that one particular study keeps resurfacing throughout the book and it gets a bit tiresome after it has been explained two or three times, but it is a major study for which one of the authors is famous, so I can forgive that.
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Format: Perfect Paperback Verified Purchase
Makes you think about different perspectives or ways in our society. Even though their studies are mainly USA data-based, it gives you a broad idea on how our human world carry on.
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