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Frankenstein Created Woman [Blu-ray] [US Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00GNZM03G
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 96,143 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A decade on from their groundbreaking The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and its excellent sequel The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), Terence Fisher and Peter Cushing renewed their collaboration on Hammer's greatest horror franchise with the macabre Frankenstein Created Woman, a reasonable return to form for the series after the decidedly weaker Cushing / Freddie Francis effort The Evil of Frankenstein (1964). Now reduced to penury after his repeated hounding and exile in previous films, Baron Victor Frankenstein lives quietly in a little European village, arousing the suspicion of the locals, but curiously, not their persecution. When his young assistant is executed for a crime he didn't commit, the boy's crippled girlfriend drowns herself with grief, at which point Victor decides to transplant not the brain, but the soul of his assistant into the girl's reconstructed body...
Frankenstein Created Woman is now regarded by many critics as one of the best Hammer films, though in all honesty it has always left me rather cold. Presumably supposed to follow on from the previous Francis-directed entry in terms of continuity, it has Cushing's Baron on more confident and sardonic form than it that film, a complex, cold-hearted, yet curiously sympathetic outcast; however, he is still considerably more flaky and detached than he was in Fisher's first two movies (and a far cry from the bad-to-the-bone bastard he'd become in 1969's Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed). Though fresh ideas (soul rather than brain transplants, and obviously the female 'creation') help to shake up the by-now-familiar plot, the film is curiously devoid of action, save the three climactic murders, and it leaves the viewer feeling as though the potential in its premise has largely gone to waste.
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Format: VHS Tape
This is the only one of the Hammer Frankenstein films I've seen so far, and from what I've read about the others in the series I have a lot to look forward to.
In this film Dr Frankenstein merges the soul of a beheaded man with the body of his drowned girlfriend, who then goes on a killing streak of the 3 guys who got him hanged for a crime he didn't commit in the first place (the girlfriends father).
I just love these old horror movies, but they are quite expensive where I live, so I buy them from Amazon.uk instead.
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Format: DVD
Baron Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) uses his surgical skills to transform a disfigured woman into a beautiful Playboy Playmate (Susan Denberg). The problem is that he has also transferred the soul of her dead lover, Hans (Robert Morris), into her body and Hans was framed for murder and then executed so revenge is on the cards.

This is an entertaining entry in Hammer's "Frankenstein" series of films and it saw Terence Fisher return to the series as director. The story may be a bit daft in places and lacking in logic (since when has that mattered anyway in 1960s' horror movies?) but it moves along quite well and contains some interesting and original ideas.

Peter Cushing is excellent, yet again, as The Baron and Thorley Walters (who kind of cornered the market in playing doddery old sods) is good as The Baron's dotty assistant, Doctor Hertz. Look out for Derek Fowlds (from "Yes, Minister" and "Heartbeat") as an upper-class twit who gets what's coming to him.

At the end of the day, the combination of Hammer/Fisher/Cushing makes this movie a must-see for anyone who loves classic British horror.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
... so don't believe what you see on the box cover of this Zone A (locked) BR release. Even so, Fisher has managed to create a minor masterpiece here!
It's easy to see why this movie was not well received on its initial theatrical run. No "monster", Frankenstein himself playing only a peripheral part in the proceedings (the focus of the narrative being on the tragic love story between the two protagonists), a distinct lack of horror with a very downbeat and unexciting climax .. and perhaps most of all, the failure of the movie to live up to the hype created by the publicity stills ie a naked or almost naked Miss Denberg (publicised with typical Hammer chutzpa as a previous Playboy nude model), as on the box cover of this BR. No such scenes ever appeared in the film and I'm sure I was not alone in thinking that I was seeing a censored version when I first saw this movie many years ago. So, audiences felt cheated: this was not typical Hammer Horror, moreover the promise of naked flesh was not delivered ( Hammer would finally deliver on this promise, with style and gusto, a few years later with Vampire Lovers).
But viewed on its own terms, without any preconceptions, and as a tragic fairy story in its own fantasy world, this is a wonderful, delicate and brilliantly constructed movie. True, the film doesn't hold up to logical analysis: a spiritual soul trapped by a physical force field; a drunken and discredited GP doctor performing incredibly advanced surgery; a "transplanted" soul which seems able to come and go at will; and that amazing decapitated head, resistant to all decomposition after months of death .. none of this makes any sense in the "real world". But this is Fisher's fairy tale world, fabulous and dream-like - and on this level, the film works perfectly.
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