Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

More Options
Frances The Mute
 
Zoom
See larger image (with zoom)
 

Frances The Mute

21 Feb. 2005 | Format: MP3

6.59 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 4.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
13:02
30
2
5:50
30
3
12:21
30
4
13:09
30
5
4:45
30
6
6:40
30
7
2:55
30
8
7:41
30
9
4:59
30
10
3:48
30
11
0:46
30
12
0:54
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
THE MARS VOLTA - FRANCES THE MUTE
'Frances the Mute' is The Mars Volta's next step into their bizarre land of hardcore techno progressive rock. Their previous efforts have both been mind blowing, using out of the blue tempo changes, huge ranges of instruments and most importantly the ever ingenious pairing of minds that is Cedric Bixler Zavala and Omar A Rodriguez Lopez. Like 'De-loused in the Comatorium', 'Frances' is effectively a long heroine fuelled story on the other side of consciousness, but this time round it's more of an experience when listened to from to start to finish. It only actually consists of five songs, despite my CD player telling me twelve and the track listing telling me something like fifteen. Further confusion is caused by the song 'Frances the Mute''s lyrics appearing inside the CD case, despite there being no such song on the album.
The lyrics are based on a anonymous diary stumbled upon, telling of an abandoned child searching for his parents, but apart from little hints like "I won't forget who I'm looking for" you would never guess so. Since their early days in their former band 'At the Drive-in' Bixler Zavala and Rodriguez Lopez have taunted with words so deep and cryptic that I doubt even they know what they're talking about. This becomes most evident on 'L'Via L'Viaquez' where the verses are sung in what I presume is Spanish; perhaps Latin; perhaps neither. Nonsensical as the words are, make no mistake, they still have a profound effect when sung as emotionally as Bixler Zavala. He pours his heart and soul into the bounding vocal melodies; if this tells the story of a tragedy then it is still unwaveringly upbeat and uplifting, thanks in no small part to the blaring riffs and intricate solos from guitarist Rodriguez Lopez.
Read more ›
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I really loved The Mars Volta's previous album, De-loused in the Comatorium and I was rather uncertain when I first heard this. It certainly wasn't as easy to get into than their first one but after you've had the patience to listen to it a few times it all starts to make sense.
On this album they've incorporated a lot more instruments and styles to the music and at the same time gone even more crazy in how they use them. Generally this works really well and the use of Spainish lyrics (at least I think it's Spainish) sounds really good, and it's not like their lyrics made any sense anyway... The track listing is as crazy as the music and you get the sense that they added in breaks between tracks on the CD just as a courtesy.
My main complaint would be that sometimes they go a bit too far and venture into the realm of randomness. Four minutes of the same piece of birdsong played over and over again can become tedious very quickly so I just skip past it.
All in all it's a really great album and something completely different. It's worth getting just for the last track alone. It's not for everyone though, I could understand how some people could hate this. If you haven't listened to the Mars Volta before I would recomend their first album over this as it's a lot easier to get into.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 17 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Mars Volta then. What actually are they? Frances the Mute characterises the genre hopping style that surrounds the band and the two musical enigmas at its heart- Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodriguez. It is weird, to say the least, downright odd, if we are going to be honest, and it transcends pretty much every genre you could ever attempt to stick onto it. Most certianly what it is not is deloused pt II, a shame in some ways, but in others a relief. To compare the Mars Volta with my other favourite band, Queens of the Stone Age, progression is the key. Each time the Queens release an album, there is disappointment that it is not like their last one, something which should never ever have even been expected.
So the actual album. Well it is weird, but amazingly interesting. The flashes of punk which filled the 1st long player are still there, but there is overall a much greater sense of experimentation. The first track explodes with a swirling guitar that ATD-I would've been proud of, as fugazi style drum riffs punctuate the stop start dynamics. This is almost mars volta by numbers, until Rodriguez (who produced much of the album) slurs the riff into dreamy ambience. When the Mars Volta really shine is when they are at their weirdest, their most unexpected. L'Via Viaquez is perhaps the best track on the album, as a wailing guitar is set over precise salsa tempo drums and bass. The musicianship is breathtaking, the dynamics awe inspiring and the timing exquisite to say the least. My personal favourite track is the breathtakingly haunting Miranda That Ghost Just Isn't Holy Anymore, flea's trumpet melding beautifully with the pained vocals of Bixler.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
The track listing is wrong here. The intended list would have been five tracks, but Universal demanded 12 tracks or the album would be an EP (despite nearly being 80 minutes long). The band split up the fifth track because it was the longest. It is not evenly divided into its component parts (Tarantism etc.), and Miranda is not split up at all. You can easily tell because the last part of Miranda is a repeat of the end of Cygnus, and occurs on track 4. Also the lyrics for Cassandra clearly start on track 5.

The actual track listing is:

1. Cygnus...Vismund Cygnus

2. The Widow

3. L'Via Viaquez

4. Miranda That Ghost Just Isn't Holy Anymore

5. Cassandra Gemini I

6. Cassandra Gemini II

7. Cassandra Gemini III

8. Cassandra Gemini IV

9. Cassandra Gemini V

10. Cassandra Gemini VI

11. Cassandra Gemini VII

12. Cassandra Gemini VIII

Amazon really should fix this error.

Also: this is by far my favourite Mars Volta so far (Amputechture isn't out yet).
3 Comments 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?