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Fragments (Penguin Classics) by [Heraclitus]
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Fragments (Penguin Classics) Kindle Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Length: 128 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Heraclitus's fragments come to us like sparks off an anvil. . . . a luminous translation."

"A pellucid and informed translation." (Rita Dove, "The Washington Post")

"Breathtaking." (Richard Howard)

"Heraclitus''s fragments come to us like sparks off an anvil. . . . a luminous translation." (Nicholas Christopher)

"Breathtaking." (Richard Howard)

"A pellucid and informed translation." (Rita Dove, "The Washington Post")



"Heraclitus's fragments come to us like sparks off an anvil. . . . a luminous translation." (Nicholas Christopher)
"Breathtaking." (Richard Howard)
"A pellucid and informed translation." (Rita Dove, The Washington Post)

-Heraclitus's fragments come to us like sparks off an anvil. . . . a luminous translation.- (Nicholas Christopher)
-Breathtaking.- (Richard Howard)
-A pellucid and informed translation.- (Rita Dove, The Washington Post)

About the Author

Brooks Haxton's poetry translations include Dances for Flute and Thunder: Poems from the Ancient Greek, which was nominated for a PEN translation award, and Victor Hugo's Selected Poems for Penguin Classics.
James Hillman has written more than twenty books, including The Force of Character, Re-Visioning Psychology (nominated for a Pulitzer in 1975), and The Soul's Code, which debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list in 1996. He is an internationally renowned lecturer, teacher, and psychologist and has taught at Yale, Syracuse, and the University of Chicago. Born in New Jersey, Hillman now lives in Thompson, Connecticut.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1797 KB
  • Print Length: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Bilingual edition (28 Oct. 2003)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001R6OTNK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #358,653 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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3.0 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
The book predominately consists of the fragments themselves presented in a helpful translinear fashion with plenty of margin-space for notes. In this respect it does well.

The foreward however sheds light on the authors' biased reading of Heraclitus as an ancient proponent of postmodernism! The translation, in parts, shares this same bias. Heraclitus speaks of The Logos, which is truth shared between all humanity, if only they will wake up to look upon it. The individual worlds of men are dreamlike dellusions, he says. In my opinion Heraclitus was the anti-thesis of a postmodernist.

But nevermind, highly usable and superbly layed-out. Look elsewhere for a sensible commentary.
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Format: Paperback
Not only do the author's misinterpret Heraclitus, their translations are also WRONG. Get Charles Kahn's academic translation instead.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Enjoyable and easy to read, interesting how translation / interpretation differs from others, makes you think about things more
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 18 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Bit of Commandeering 23 Jun. 2013
By Jake Fox - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This particular edition, as others have made clear, is insufficient for the reader looking to understand Heraclitus. For those just entering the pre-Socratic realm, it is dangerous. If the reader is unfamiliar or uncomfortable with the ancient world (especially Greece), this edition would constitute a grave error. I cannot attest to the Greek provided in addition to the English (its accuracy as would be judged by scholars in the field), so I limit my remarks to the translation, the Translator's notes, and the introduction.

The edition smacks of a trendy-dogmatic approach that is neither honest to the subject nor the ideological disposition at work. The introduction by James Hillman emphasizes a constricted view of the subject from the onset. The reader, already primed by this incompatible perspective, is then given an adaptation. This adaptation-approach is undertaken by the translator to 'freshen up' the original and increase its accessibility. Unfortunately, it merely continues to corrupt Heraclitus' fragile remnants. For example, the first fragment page translates 'Logos' as the Christian Biblical 'The Word'. John the Baptist is centuries removed from Heraclitus, who is quite an outlier even amongst ancient Greek thinkers. It is disrespectful, confusing and ahistorical--taking liberties such as this promotes a total loss of a work's identity, regardless of whether or not John the Baptist shared the literal sentiment. Some of these liberties in translation appear in the notes, but others do not.

While there are derivations and flights of fancy, they are all--like the example above--blatantly obvious to those familiar with Greek literature and/or familiar with the spurious offspring of Nietzsche and Heidegger and Carl Jung.

Heraclitus, in short, doesn't need sprucing up. The Fragments aren't improved by a psychologist's ruminations. Heraclitus speaks for Heraclitus, without being soiled by an extra-serving of modern baggage/bias.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Character is fate ... just not in this translation, apparently 8 Nov. 2011
By Peter Monks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was a bit underwhelmed by "Fragments", which is not only a slim volume to start with but also consists of the text in Greek on facing pages. I have no doubt that Heraclitus had a revolutionary way of looking at the world 2500 or so years ago, but now it reads a bit like a watered-down cross between Marcus Aurelius and Ecclesiastes. Of course, this may well be a result of the translation (which has received plenty of criticism from reviewers who appear better informed than me) - I raised my eyebrows when the foreword described this as a "deconstruction", and raised them again when I noted that "character is fate" had become the decidedly less forceful "one's bearing shapes one's fate".

Five stars if you really want to brush up on your Ancient Greek, and four stars if you have been waiting for the postmodernist interpretation of Heraclitus (I guess someone out there has been). For the rest of us, three stars. There is still some thought-provoking stuff in here, but if you are looking for an introduction to Stoic thought you are much better off with Meditations (Penguin Classics).
3.0 out of 5 stars A very nicely put together little book. 7 Jun. 2015
By Jean Efpraxiadis - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The translation of the fragments is a bit too "free". Not as close to the original as it could easily and profitably be. Overall a good effort in making Heraclitus accessible to a wide audience.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing 9 Jun. 2013
By N. Coppedge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book does contain some interesting verses, some of which seem to reflect Heraclitus' relation to spiritual influences or forms of ancient belief. This book might be great for a Greek scholar, although I doubt they need two editions.

I found it to be surprisingly short, which disappointed me. A creative staff would just make it up, and publish edition after edition to make it fleshed out and authentic. I guess that's against the rules. So we're stuck with the original, supposedly.

I found the following link to be more helpful about Heraclitus: 52 Heraclitus Quotes:

http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/77989.Heraclitus

These quotes available on the web are much more inspired. I guess they come from other Greeks' second-hand accounts of Heraclitus.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 11 Jun. 2015
By BostonBlue - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Deep insight...just wish I had a more basic translation
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