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The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition: A New History of the Great Depression by [Shlaes, Amity]
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The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition: A New History of the Great Depression Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Review

""The Forgotten Man" offers an understanding of the era's politics and economics that may be unprecedented in its clarity."--Mark Helprin

""The Forgotten Man" is revisionist history at its best--full of fresh insights, undogmatic judgments, and illuminating observations. Shlaes's account of The Great Depression goes beyond the familiar arguments of liberals and conservatives to make a truly original contribution. And it's an awfully good read."--William Kristol, Editor of "The Weekly Standard"

""The Forgotten Man" is an incisive and controversial history of the Great Depression that challenges much of the received wisdom."--Harold Evans, author of "The American Century" and "They Made America"

"Everyone who has always wanted to share "The Forgotten Man" now has a wonderful medium, this book. Give it, enjoy it. Teach your children with it."--Steve Forbes

Rendered with extraordinary historical detail. . . . A dazzling achievement. --"The Washington Times""

Everyone who has always wanted to share "The Forgotten Man" now has a wonderful medium, this book. Give it, enjoy it. Teach your children with it. --Steve Forbes"

Entertaining, illuminating, and exceedingly fair. . . . A rich, wonderfully original, and extremely textured history of an important time. --"The American Spectator""

Amity Shlaes s fast-paced review of the [Depression] helps enormously in putting it all in perspective. --"Paul Volcker""

Amity Shlaes is among the most brilliant of the young writers who are transforming American financial journalism. --Paul Johnson, author of "Modern Times""

"The Forgotten Man" offers an understanding of the era s politics and economics that may be unprecedented in its clarity. --Mark Helprin"

"The Forgotten Man" is an incisive and controversial history of the Great Depression that challenges much of the received wisdom. --Harold Evans, author of "The American Century" and "They Made America""

"The Forgotten Man" is revisionist history at its best full of fresh insights, undogmatic judgments, and illuminating observations. Shlaes s account of The Great Depression goes beyond the familiar arguments of liberals and conservatives to make a truly original contribution. And it s an awfully good read. --William Kristol, Editor of "The Weekly Standard""

"Rendered with extraordinary historical detail. . . . A dazzling achievement."--The Washington Times

"Everyone who has always wanted to share The Forgotten Man now has a wonderful medium, this book. Give it, enjoy it. Teach your children with it."--Steve Forbes

"Entertaining, illuminating, and exceedingly fair. . . . A rich, wonderfully original, and extremely textured history of an important time."--The American Spectator

"Amity Shlaes's fast-paced review of the [Depression] helps enormously in putting it all in perspective."--Paul Volcker

"Amity Shlaes is among the most brilliant of the young writers who are transforming American financial journalism."--Paul Johnson, author of Modern Times

"The Forgotten Man offers an understanding of the era's politics and economics that may be unprecedented in its clarity."--Mark Helprin

"The Forgotten Man is revisionist history at its best--full of fresh insights, undogmatic judgments, and illuminating observations. Shlaes's account of The Great Depression goes beyond the familiar arguments of liberals and conservatives to make a truly original contribution. And it's an awfully good read."--William Kristol, Editor of The Weekly Standard

"The Forgotten Man is an incisive and controversial history of the Great Depression that challenges much of the received wisdom."--Harold Evans, author of The American Century and They Made America

From the Back Cover

An illustrated edition of Amity Shlaes's bestseller The Forgotten Man, featuring vivid black-and-white illustrations that capture this dark period in American history and the men and women, from all walks of life, whose character and ideas helped them persevere

It's difficult today to imagine how America survived the Great Depression. Only through the stories of the common people who struggled during that era--the ones with rock-solid values that helped them through the toughest of times--can we really understand how the nation endured.

These are the people at the heart of The Forgotten Man. This imaginative illustrated edition highlights one of the most devastating periods in our nation's history through the lives of American people, from politicians and workers to businessmen, farmers, and ordinary citizens. Smart and stylish black-and-white art from acclaimed illustrator Paul Rivoche provides an utterly original vision of the coexistence of despair and hope that characterized Depression-era America. Shlaes's narrative and Rivoche's art illuminate key economic concepts, showing how government intervention helped to make the Depression great by overlooking the men and women who were trying to help themselves.

The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition captures the spirit of this crucial moment in American history and the steadfast character and ingenuity of those who lived it.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 185050 KB
  • Print Length: 293 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Graphic ed. edition (26 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00KPVCG4M
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
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Format: Paperback
‘The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition’ originally written by Amity Shlaes is comic adaptation of a bit controversial title ‘A New History of the Great Depression’ where its author who is one of the most respected economic analysts provided different interpretation of the time known as the Great Depression.

The importance of the book is primarily in the fact that it provides a different picture compared to what we were taught in the schools of this period; in same time being extremely informative about the Great Depression, it manages to somehow end the history myths that are usually connected with those times, mainly about the view on Roosevelt’s New Deal. What is certainly evident is amount of time author spent writing and researching her book, therefore it is not surprising that the result is such an interesting and extensive work, which is extremely important to consider from the historical and economic point of view.

Speaking about this graphic version, first I would say that the audience the author addresses is different from the one of text version - this edition will be more liked by younger people who may not have enough time or will to go through 500 pages of text, but also for those who love graphics novel in general because it certainly offers great illustrations and interesting story, especially for a person who has not read the original book.

The story is told from the perspective of Wendell Willkie, an executive who worked in utilities company, a man who ran against Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the election back in 1940. Willkie will introduce reader to the history of the Great Depression, though in moments his story can somehow seem disjointed, perhaps in this way also giving criticism how contradictory the New Deal policies actually were.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 70 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful adaptation of an even more wonderful book. 29 Aug. 2016
By Craig Matteson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have admired Amity Shlaes writing since I read her in the Financial Times. Her book, “The Forgotten Man” and her biography of Coolidge are among my favorites and books I recommend to everyone. The problem is that a lot of people under 35 don’t read many books nowadays. This is a terrible problem for the future. When I saw this version of “The Forgotten Man” in graphic novel format, I bought it to see how it worked. While I still much prefer the full book, this is a very wonderful version that might well spark interest in young people to read the complete book.

The book is arranged for you to just jump right into the story, but I think this would be a mistake for most people. Here’s why. This graphic novel is not like a superhero story where you can tell by radically different costumes and distinctive body features who is who. This is based on history and real life and most people are ordinary looking and in any given period, we tend to dress very much alike. Sure, FDR had his cigarette holder. But really. Do you know who Rex Tugwell was or Harold Ickes or what they looked like? So, you need to start at the BACK of this book.

The last page lays out the ground rules for the book. They authors admit they are fictionalizing the narrator’s words to an extent. The narrator is Wendell Wilke. He was a utilities executive and ended up running against FDR in 1940 (unsuccessfully). He was a liberal Republican (yes, those existed in those days, remember the Progressive Movement was in BOTH parties (and still is – but they mask it better today). But Utilities and the role of the government versus the private sector in generating electricity was a huge issue back then and plays a role in this book.

The book also provides us with a nice “cast of characters” feature. You get to see the drawings of their faces and a paragraph about who they were so you can recognize them in the book and have a some idea of why they are there and what the issues were beyond just trying to pick everything up from the drawings and the dialogue. Very helpful.

The backmatter also has a very helpful chart that runs from 1927 through 1940 and graphs the DOW Jones Industrial Average and unemployment levels and then sticks on snippets on key events in those years that show what was going on and what will be the key issues in the book.

After you absorb this material you are ready to really enjoy the book. I think it gets better as it goes along because themes become clearer and the points crescendo.

I enjoyed it and hope you do, as well. If you have already read the actual full book by Amity Shlaes, this is still a fun read. You should also consider giving copies to your adult children and older grandchildren. Heck, even friends who won’t read the book but might wander through this “comic book”.

Wonderful job!

Recommended!

Reviewed by Craig Matteson, Saline, MI
60 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deep scholarship and accessible learning -- not to mention a terrific idea 27 May 2014
By James Lucier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Here is incisive history in a graphic format that really captures the look and feel of the 1930s. It's totally original idea. It makes you wonder why more history books aren't presented this way, especially when they deal with a foundational period such as the 1930s that shapes our lives and experience to this day. I was a fan of the 480-page scholarly book, which should be the next step for anyone reading the graphic edition that has not read the big book first. Amity Shlaes presents an enormous number of personalities and situations in densely-researched, meticulously reported detail. The writing is lively, but here—wow! The personalities jump right off the page and the arc of the narrative takes off before your eyes. It's like watching a fine mosaic turn into a movie. I would recommend the Forgotten Man Graphic Edition for history buffs of any age, but I would recommend it particularly for university students getting interested in the field and secondly, for post-college adults who may have studied another areas and think that an ambitious, serious (and pathbreaking) work of social and economic history might be more than than they can handle. Yet with the Graphic Edition they can plow right in. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a significant number of new writers find their inspiration in this masterwork by Miss Shlaes. The more, the merrier, I say.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but confusing to follow 29 Nov. 2014
By Jon Dykstra - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's an interesting, but quite hard to follow conservative take on why the Great Depression happened. I'm conservative myself, and would generally agree with the argument presented here, and I am also a fan of the graphic novel format. So I really wanted to like this. But it was a struggle to make it all the way through.

That said, I did find it valuable from an educational perspective - I learned a lot. But one of the reasons I like historical graphical novels is that they are supposed to make learning a little less painful. Maybe it did make it a little less so, but only a little. And thus, three stars.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Timely" explanation of the Progressive Movement in action today! 14 Aug. 2015
By J. Welling - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Perfectly timed book....this has been used in Senior High School and early College education by this teacher and her students. This is the story behind the beginning of the progressive movement that we are feeling the effects of today. As one student said "this didn't start with President Obama"...."no young man it didn't". If your looking to understand our current affairs look no further than this book. The author introduces the characters and their part in the unfolding of history. Using the graphic education is perfect for young people and us older students as well. A good companion study is written by Katherine Dang of Philomath Foundation,
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars 19 May 2017
By Stephen Hoff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
good book, but it turns out I am not a graphic novel fan...I prefer the original text
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