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The Forge of God by [Bear, Greg]
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The Forge of God Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

engaging, gripping and scarily readable ... a great read. (SFFworld.com)

Book Description

A stunning novel of alien invasion from a master of the genre.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1402 KB
  • Print Length: 484 pages
  • Publisher: Open Road Media Sci-Fi & Fantasy (1 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00J52FOHI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I stumbled across Greg Bear and this book about 3 years ago. It really blew me away! I have re-read the book a couple of times and the emotion of the finale still bites too deep for comfort. Who says hard sci-fi cannot be for the heart as well as the head... The reworkings and discarding of familiar sci-fi themes is very clever and makes you continually have to reevaluate the book as you read on. If you have not already read this book, BUY IT! Then go out and buy EON. The only guy giving Bear a run for his money is Peter Hamilton (Reality Dysfunction, et al). It does not get better than this.
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Format: Paperback
Here's a welcome re-release, originally from 1987. This was Greg's fourth novel. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1987, and was also nominated for the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1988.

It is basically a combination of alien invasion novel and global catastrophe tale. As with the best of these tales, it starts simply. Set in contemporary times (well, 1996), it tells us of what happens when there are a number of seemingly-relatively minor solar system anomalies. Astronomers suddenly notice that Europa, the moon orbiting Jupiter, disappears. This is perceived with little interest by the non-astronomer general public. Then mountains are discovered in the Mojave Desert in the USA and in Australia, in areas where less than a year before there were no mountains.

What these are in actual fact are two spaceships. In the case of the spacecraft crashing in the Californian Mojave desert, there is a dying alien, in its own words, `a flea', hitchhiking a ride with superior beings. In English, it tells its discoverers that it is very sorry to bring bad news but that the Earth is doomed.

In the case of the Australian ship we have metallic silver floating gourd-shapes telling people that they come in peace for our benefit.

The truth is sadly more sinister. What is happening is that the aliens, attracted by radio signals emitted from Earth, have brought with them two `bullets' of neutronium and anti-neutronium that are eating through the interior of the Earth. Their meeting will be the end of the Earth as we know it. Moreover there is the scary realisation that this is deliberate: it is this that creates the matter used to birth more alien spaceships, a force created by a mechanical alien species who look at humans as if they are a lower lifeform.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I must confess, after reading the blurb attached to Mr. Bear's book I assumed that it was some sort of comedy. A moon vanishes and then aliens arrive baring bad news ?? "Must be a humourous read" I thought.....

Boy was I wrong !! Greg Bear describes in detail just what happens when two different species of alien arrive, both at the same time, both of whom are being economical with the truth as to their reasons for visiting. With characters you care about and want to see succeed in their survival, Mr. Bear's story takes us on a bleak and certainly "terminal" road to earth's destruction at the hands of aliens who, whilst not necessarily evil, are determined to finish their task !!

The book is only 325 pages long, however, it feels a lot longer. This no way inhibits the story but I do feel that a lack of direction plagues the middle part of the novel, also, there are some characters who just disappear when I wanted to know more about them. In addition, one does need a certain amount of patience when reading all the technical jargon (some of which went over my head), but again, this does not ruin the book, I picked up the gist of what was going on easily and quickly.

I will certainly read more of Greg Bear's work
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Format: Paperback
I read The Forge of God over the course of a single weekend (yes, sad but true) and have to say that it's the most fantastic, epic and disturbing book I've read in many, many years.
The build-up is well-paced, the character's are all fully believable and the finale is as epic (and as depressing) as it gets. Bear's sequel, Anvil Of Stars, is just as impressive.
This is crying out to be made into a film with a good sci-fi director (Scott, Cameron, Hyams, Fincher) at the helm, along with Bear's classic 'Eon'. Although Bear prefers to keep on writing epic, near-future sci-fi such as his brilliant new Darwin's Radio, perhaps he could consider taking time-out to carefully develop The Forge of God into a screenplay. Putting images to this fabulous story would be the icing on the cake (that's if Bear's infamous 'Planet Eaters' don't gobble it up first)
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Format: Paperback
A fast-paced rollercoaster of a novel from Bear which builds inexorably to its inevitable climax.
In a theme later to be picked up by Alastair Reynolds and Jack McDevitt, Bear introduces us to the concept of the ‘culling’ of Humanity while painting a portrait of a civilisation faced with its imminent destruction.
Like many Bear novels it build slowly, gathers momentum and rushes to a breathtaking climax.
It’s a multi-character narrative, revolving around the central figure of Arthur Gordon, cosmologist and scientific advisor to the President.
Two spaceships disguised as natural rock formations are simultaneously discovered in the USA and Australia. One carries a dying alien who tells of the Earth’s imminent destruction by machine intelligences, while the Australian ship disgorges three gourd-shaped robots who preach of sharing their scientific knowledge with humanity.
President Crockerman, shaken by his meeting with the alien, bestows a religious significance on the events and deduces that Mankind is about to be judged by God.
Subsequently, while two black-hole-like neutronium pellets penetrate the Earth, racing toward a violent collision at the core, a second faction of extra-terrestrials makes itself known, able only to save a portion of humanity while fighting the predations of the ‘planet-eaters’.
Bear, to be fair, goes out of his way to portray a world beyond the borders of the US. One of the main characters for instance is the British Science Fiction writer, Trevor Hicks, who is shown to be far more level-headed and rational than the President.
It’s an interesting First Contact story in that we do not get to discover those with whom contact has been made.
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