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Forge of Darkness: The Kharkanas Trilogy 1 Hardcover – 31 Jul 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Press (31 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593062175
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593062173
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 4.4 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 352,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Forge of Darkness is brilliant and far exceeds any and all expectations that readers of 'The Malazan Book of the Fallen' could possibly harbour...I think we all wondered how Erikson could possibly follow up arguably the best fantasy series of all time. Forge of Darkness will dispel any and all doubters (if any do indeed still exist out there) that Steven Erikson is the best writer on the planet." (SFSITE)

"Forge of Darkness is, quite frankly, remarkable...Erikson should be raised up as a standadrd bearer, representing the best of the best of those books we would love to be more loved - those that are intellctually nutritious as well as artistically delicious." (TOR.COM)

Book Description

Steven Erikson returns to the Malazan world with the first book in a dark and revelatory new epic fantasy trilogy that tells the tragic story of the downfall of an ancient realm...

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a Big Fan so yes i'm going to be biased, lets get that out front and give the book a big 5 stars. I could wax lyrical about Eriksons prose or world building or Dialogue or philosophy but suffice to say he still rules the roost for Fantasty in my opinion (he can actually finish a series).

Yes this book is dark, infact it starts dark and ends pitch black. With the main characters involved in this book, and the hints of what went on in the Malazan series, you knew it was never going to be a riot of laughs going in. I will admit, that as with his other books, its a very tough read to start with, it may have taken me longer to read the 1st 3rd of the book than the rest of it put together, but he really does make it worth it.

In somewhat reply to a previous review, i find myself comming to Erikson's defense regarding timelines and what has been told/hinted/mentioned in passing in the Malazan series that links with these books. He has always discussed the fluidity of History in his books and i love when he does. I can't do it justice personally, but the fact that his last series of books has an historian as an important character, and this set also does, you should gather Erikson has given it allot of thought.

If you view what is told in the malazan series about the kharkanas series as FACT then you missed Eriksons many points on history. Every god/tiste/jaghut/human has thier own view of history, and any historian can colour the way they record history to suit themselves (sometimes without even knowing). The "history" told in the malazan series is from events many thousands of years ago, and as such this "History" whether from songs or books or even from "gods" alive at the time, has been corrupted many times over.
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Format: Hardcover
As a huge fan of Steven I was wondering for a while what he'd hit back with after the completion of the Malazan Book of the Fallen series. I shouldn't have worried as in this, the Kharkanas series, he's travelled to an earlier period to bring the tales of that to the reader. Whilst a few of the cast are known to readers of the Malazan series its refreshing as you get to see how their personalities have changed alongside finding out how the events played out that shaped them in the future.

As with Steven's other work it's an epic scale, it has more threads than a tapestry and when added to his solid prose and cracking world building skills, really makes him one of the modern names that will be remembered for a very long time. Finally throw into the mix, a huge cast list, political double-dealing and of course combat on a global scale and all round the readers in for another epic treat. Great stuff.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a typical Erikson Novel, weel detailed and very long winded; great characters but I fee the story takes forvere to get going. I have soldiered through but I need a rest to gather my will to try and finish this one.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As ever, Erikson's writing is dense, sometimes rambling, sometimes quite beautiful. Much of the book was interesting, even gripping, and it gave a useful insight into some of the subsequent major characters, and their origins and development. At times, though, it failed to hold my attention, and I found it dull and plodding. Getting through was more of a duty than a pleasure. But it was worth the effort, and I shall doubtless snap up future volumes.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved this book. Possible SPOILERS BELOW!!!

Having read and reread almost everything in the Malazan universe by this point, Forge of Darkness was like balm on my soul. I really really needed some insight into the actual people behind these larger than life characters from the Books of the Fallen series. Who was Anomander before he was this god like Dragnipur wielding Son of Darkness. Why was he so alienated from his Brothers and what happened there. Why did Andarist end up on an island for god knows how many years in seclusion and what drove him to do that. Who are these elder gods, and where did they come from. Hood and Sechul Lath, Errastas, Kalamandaris, Caladan Brood and Olar Ethil.
This trilogy explores where these people came from, and who they were in their "youth" before they became those powerfull yet broken characters in the Fallen series. It also tells gives us more information about the Vitr, very lightly touched on by Erikson before but mostly known from Esslemonts storyline involving Taychreen and Kiska. Forge of Darkness, as the title suggests however, is the tale of a people the Tiste, and how that people and their culture breaks down. It is a heartbreaking tale of love and loss, and of duty and the horrors done by good men. Explaining somewhat how they come to be so broken and caught in their respective roles later on. The most stark example that of Scaba Bandaris, who we meet as a young, noble and good captain in the tiste army. - Nothing to suggest that he would later so betray his honor.
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