FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Forests: The Shadow of Ci... has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. Book has appearance of only minimal use. All pages are undamaged with no significant creases or tears. With pride from the Motor City.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Forests: The Shadow of Civilization Paperback – 1 Mar 1993

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.50
£13.08 £5.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£19.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • Forests: The Shadow of Civilization
  • +
  • The Dominion of the Dead
Total price: £32.50
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; New edition edition (1 Mar. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226318079
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226318073
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 357,160 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product description

About the Author

Robert Pogue Harrison is the Rosina Pierotti Professor in Italian Literature and chairs the Department of French and Italian at Stanford University. He is the author of The Body of Beatrice, Forests: The Shadow of Civilization, The Dominion of the Dead, Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition, and Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age, the latter three published by the University of Chicago Press. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also host of the radio program Entitled Opinions on Stanford's station KZSU 90.1.


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Don't be put off by this being written by an academic. This is a major work - so far fairly unnoticed - and worth your time. I cannot praise it highly enough. The author has taught me to look at the world in a different way; to understand my place in things; to realise why we are where we are; and even to come to terms with my mortality.
Ranks alongside "The Soul of the White Ant" by Eugene Marais as a classic of its kind.
Buy it. Once read, you won't want to sell it on.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 25 Feb. 1999
Format: Paperback
My old Cambridge tutor said that the only works of modern literary criticism he'd sell his shirt for were *Seven Types of Ambiguity* and *The Wheel of Fire*. For a long time I agreed. Then I read *Forests*. It is quite simply the most profound, the most moving, the best-written, the most important work of literary criticism of the late twentieth century.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 25 Feb. 1999
Format: Paperback
My old Cambridge tutor said that the only works of modern literary criticism he'd sell his shirt for were *Seven Types of Ambiguity* and *The Wheel of Fire*. For a long time I agreed. Then I read *Forests*. It is quite simply the most profound, the most moving, the best-written, the most important work of literary criticism of the late twentieth century.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought this was going to be a book on how people and forests have interacted with each other througout the ages - how in the quest for conquest England practically eradiated it's oak trees to supply the warship trade. Or how early settlers to Africa thought that "the barren savannah could do with some sprucing up" and planted thousands of eucalyptus trees to make it "better"

Instead all i got was an essay of interpretations of classical texts that happened to contain the words, "trees and forests" I didn't even finish the first chapter.

Extremely disappointed. Total garbage.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 17 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fine book from the host of "Entitled Opinions" 21 Dec. 2014
By Michael A. Faraone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone who listens to the author's podcast "Entitled Opinions" should obtain a copy of this book. The qualities you like in the podcast, the intersection of literature, history, and philosophy, are explored in this book in the context of the forest. Anyone unfamiliar with the podcast, find it in iTunes. The podcast he did on Joseph Conrad is exemplary; he displays how literature should be taught but, from what I have experienced, and from what I discern from others, rarely is. The same is true of the several podcasts centering on Martin Heidegger, a deliberately difficult thinker. Like the BBC's "In Our Time" podcast, Harrison carries on a fairly high-level conversation (usually with a guest) without becoming lost in 'mere' technical aspects of the subject, but also without 'talking down' to his audience or popularizing and simplifying to the point of banalities, the way podcasts of this kind too often do. The same is true of this book.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful, Pessimistic 22 Oct. 2007
By Tidewater - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Harrison's work is pioneering in the sense that he delves into the human psyche as much as he does into the history of forests. By his definition, which is convincing, there are virtually no forests left in the world. For reasons the author explores, men for millennia have atacked forests and cleared them away. This destructive activity seems to have been universal, not wedded to a particular geography, culture or religion.

Harrison journeys through several epochs using the classical literature of the periods to illustrate his points. Frankly, his deeper medtitations that verge on philosophy and metaphysics were over my head. (One place he praises Heidegger for insights, in another he criticizes him. Nietszche ditto.) Nevertheless, the main thrust is clear: humans are at risk because they have denuded the world's landscape of the forests that up to now have provided the foundation for their culture, mores and myths.

What makes the book pessimistic, in my view, is that the behavior of humans over the millennia as illustrated by Harrison is overtly destructive and at the same time seemingly unreformable. Harrison makes a stab at optimism by, for example, praising the poetry of A. R. Ammons and the homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. I admire them, too, but they have hardly taken the booboisie (H.L. Mencken's term) by storm. It's hard to know what comes next in human history given the looming desertification that is the current trend, but Harrison's work strongly intimates that the future is dicey for we humans.

A nice corollary read to Harrison's work is Leslie Marmon Silko's "Almanac of the Dead," written from a very deep Native American perspective.

There is a blurb on the back dust cover of my hardback edition by Bill McKibben, but McKibben's "End of Nature" is to Harrison's work as the Bowie Bay Sox are to the Boston Red Sox--not in the same league.
5.0 out of 5 stars on the reading list 26 Feb. 2014
By steelmanner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have only just thumbed thru the book....I can tell you, that the writing of Harrison is sooo amazing....I am presently reading...The Dominion of the Dead...by Harrison , and have been sooo enthralled as well as hooked on this authour immediately, that I have only ordered the 2 other books I could find he had penned.....I will write more of the ..Forests... as I embark upon the journey of this new work...I am quietly excited.....
5.0 out of 5 stars Forests rule 29 Nov. 2013
By E. Edwards - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the most enjoyable books I've read about forests. While it is academic, it is not dry and it has many references. I wish it would have expanded more on the chapter about the ancient mother goddess forest worship. Nevertheless, the literature references and analyses are excellent. I would buy a sequel. I recommend it highly.
5.0 out of 5 stars inspiring and motivating ... 2 Jan. 2015
By J. Simon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a brilliant book of criticism that speaks directly to the repercussions of past cultural attitudes and their impact on our current era. Articulate, creative and relevant
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know