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on 15 June 2011
I really loved this book, and I am suspicious of national gastronomic guides that can be superficial and pointless. This book is anything but: especially interesting on the less obvious regions and more remarkable specialties. It is quite unlike anything else in print on the subject.

The writer has a disarming, funny, self-deprecating, well informed, somehow itself very British style; and even though its not a recipe book you learn a lot that makes you want to eat and cook what is sometimes so lovingly described. Although adherents to the cult of marmite will be outraged. A vastly more enduring, thoughtful and useful addition to your cookery library than any number of silly potboilers from our rather stale stable of celebrity writers.
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on 10 April 2013
Purchase this as a present for my mum on her birthday and Andrew kindly signed it for me (i used to work with him). Would defo recommend this book, great read and great to inspire some day trips or weekends away to explore the foods of our great country! Fantastic book!
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on 19 July 2012
A massive 500 pages, it is a comprehensive update to the original Food Lovers Guide to Britain by Henrietta Green. Webb covers all foods from pork to pick your owns from all over the country. A book that will make you very hungry...
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Whilst I'm just an amateur cook, I do love to hear about regional delicacies and where to get the best to try. As such whilst some have been on my scope for a while (such as Mr Fitzpatrick's Cordials in Rawtenstall) some I'd never heard of such as the Manchester Sausage.

As such to have a title that details some special treats to look out for when I'm out generates something a little special for your own culinary pursuits. After all finding that something special not only increases the options you have at your own meal times but also allows you to discover a few thing that you never know about (or are regional secrets) prior to reading this title.

All in this book was a wonder and I've more than got a few things that I want to try and with friends visiting from other area's I know what to ask them to bring for me to utilise which makes this, whilst not a book of recipes, one that brings the joy of quality products that are lovingly prepared that aren't available in the supermarket which not only keeps local business alive but tradition as well. Great stuff from Andrew Webb and a title that I'll have to guard as I already know one or two who are eyeing it up for "borrowing" on a permanent basis.
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on 9 June 2011
A well researched book, with good photographs, celebrating the best of British food. Find out about Bosworth Jumbles (and where the recipe came from)! Learn what a Coventry God cake or a Dorset Naga is and what makes up Love in Disguise. Best of all there's a directory of supplier of traditional and/or unusual food and drinks.
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on 17 August 2015
just as described, I would recommend
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on 28 September 2011
British food has not been regarded as one of the world's great cuisines --the eighteenth-century Sicilian nobleman Domenico Caracciolo remarked that "In England, there are sixty different religions and only one sauce" -- so food journalist Andrew Webb undertook a gastronomic tour of the country to seek out intrepid local producers, the best regional dishes and traditional recipes. He searches out Staffordshire oatcakes (also known as the 'Potteries popadom'), Bedfordshire clangers (originally a labourer's lunch in the form of a boiled suet pudding with meat at one end and fruit at the other) and Bosworth jumbles (a sweet delicacy whose recipe was supposedly found in the dead hand of King Richard III after the Battle of Bosworth). As well as celebrating the nation's food heritage, Andrew proves that the future of British food should be an intriguing and exciting one.
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on 2 September 2011
I started this book intending it to be a pick up, put down kind of book but I got so carried away with all the fantastic stories relating to each dish and its origins that I read it over a weekend. Dont expect a cookery book or you will be disappointed but if you want to be educated into the wonderful food the UK has to offer then go for it. Its a comprehensive journey through UK. I cant imagine how exhausting the writer must have been. I really hope there will be a sequel as I am sure lots of other local dishes could be included, eg the origins of Ormskirk Gingerbread.
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on 6 May 2015
Bought as present for a chef who thought it was good
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on 8 June 2011
Product description reads "A near anthology sized collection of the nation's most iconic regional dishes and traditional recipes" as far as I could see there were no recipes.
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