FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Following Girls has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Following Girls Hardcover – 13 Feb 2014

4.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.99
£0.01 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£16.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Following Girls
  • +
  • Ghastly Business
Total price: £24.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Circus (13 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408842890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408842898
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 2.5 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 790,825 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Levene's sharply observed comedy mixes affectionate satire of the stylistic oddities of the time with an invigorating sparkle of real dislike for the petty tyrannies of parental and pedagogical authority (Evening Standard)

An acerbic and gloriously evocative portrait of Seventies girlhood ... It fizzes with cracking one-liners, acute observations and acidic social satire. It's funny, boisterous and sharp (Sunday Telegraph)

She writes with such energy and panache that I found myself screaming with laughter ... Her characters are a delight [and] she gets the period beautifully right, so that one is all the time aware of the serious intent behind all the gruesome fun (Barbara Trapido)

A clever and extremely entertaining study of teenage claustrophobia (Independent)

A chance to relive the days of double maths and ciggies behind the bike sheds (Good Housekeeping)

Simultaneously funny - wryly and sometimes bleakly so - and painful to read (Sunday Times)

An acutely observed and witty portrayal of the school exploits and growing pains of a 1970s teenager . Knowing and funny, this is St Trinian's for grown-ups ***** (The Lady)

Reflective, bittersweet and frequently funny (Metro)

Book Description

For fans of An Education and My Summer of Love - a powerful and biting social satire about a girl struggling to find freedom in 1970s suburbia

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Feb. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I have read this author’s previous two novels and enjoyed both of them. This one is something a bit different. Its heroine – almost an anti-heroine – is Amanda Baker. At the start of the book she is fourteen and goes around with three other girls called Amanda – the Four Mandies. Baker, as she is mainly referred to, is a thorn in the side of her father and step mother and as well as her school teachers. I think the author captures extremely well the way schoolgirls in the nineteen seventies interacted.

Baker’s mother left the family when Baker was three to ‘find herself’ and still sends appropriate and inappropriate gifts to her daughter including, amongst others, a subscription to ‘Spare Rib’. Baker struggles to fit in at school but somehow in spite of her best efforts she always seems to be in trouble and on the verge of expulsion. He father despairs of her and spends all his time sending for brochures for schools which might turn her into the sort of daughter he wants her to be.

I enjoyed reading this book and thought the characters were believable and likeable. I thought the way the friendship between the four girls waxed and waned was convincing. I also liked Pam (Spam) – Baker’s stepmother with her sherry bottle under the sink which she had no problems sharing with Baker herself at times. This book is well written and presents an interesting picture of the life of schoolgirls in the nineteen seventies. There is plenty of humour and some marvellous one-liners which made me look at certain things in life in a different way.

If you like books which fit into several genres but are also in a genre all of their own then you may enjoy Louise Levene’s writing. I received a free copy of this book for review.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By SueKich TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover
The four school friends, each called Amanda, throw out sharp lines and witty retorts like there's no tomorrow in this engaging nostalgia-fest from Louise Levene. Regulars to the detention room, the Four Mandies (as they are collectively known) are differentiated by their surnames: Baker, Stottie, Queenie and Bunty (short for Bunter-Byng).

The book is set in the 70s but, rest assured, whenever you went to school it will all come flooding back! There's not much plot to speak of but the main Amanda - Baker - has a sufficiently interesting home life to sweep the story along. This is tremendous fun and touching too. Write out 500 times: I did enjoy this book, I did enjoy this book, I did enjoy this book...
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
The ethos for private schools for girls in the 1970s (though not confined to that dire decade) was intended to quell adolescent anarchy - or as headmistresses preferred to claim, prepare young women for a fulfilled life (undefined). Louise Levene's fire-cracker of a book takes the side of rebellious teenagers as they defy the rules and expectations of teachers and parents.
The four Mandies in the same form at Mildred Fawcett School - all named Amanda, to the irritation of teachers ticking them off individually - gang up against authority in uneasy alliances. But how long can youngsters hold out? Is it smarter to subvert the system by playing by the rules, as slightly older Julia does? Everyone has a weak spot, as those in control know full well.
Though this book is immensely diverting, a St.Trinians of the Seventies, its conclusion is unnerving. Growing up entails burning out, selling out, giving up. Read it with glee but without nostalgia.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Louise Levene's third novel is a rare pleasure. Beautifully and touchingly written, funny and bittersweet. The author elucidates the dynamics of teenage friendship with particular sensitivity, and her heroine, Amanda, is a delight.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Change the genders, and this could almost have been about me and my all-boys' Grammar. Most books and articles about "Growing Up in the 1970's" annoy me intensely as clichéd and inaccurate. This book is absolutely spot on. The cultural references are subtle, obscure even: smoking beagles, "cats like plain crisps" (a bizarre graffito of the period), "Ads and Admen" magazine, and "the bald one in Roxy Music" (Brian Eno?) hit the spot. Above all, it captures the claustrophobia and frustration of well-meaning but hopeless teachers with no idea how to motivate their charges, bored kids who don't see the point, an awful pedantic Geography teacher (my school had one even worse), stupid speech-days addressed by dopey posh people on a completely different wavelength, equally clueless child psychologists and the whole futile pettiness of it all. This book is uncomfortable reading but brilliant!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback