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Focus on 3D Models (Game Development Series) Paperback – 23 Dec 2002

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Premier Press; Pap/Com edition (23 Dec. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592000339
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592000333
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 15.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,374,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

1. Reviewing Matrices and Vectors 2. Introduction to Quaternions 3. Quake II's MD2 Models 4. Loading OBJ Files 5. An Introduction to Skeletal Animation 6. MilkShape 3D 7. The 3ds Models 8. MDL, The Legendary Half-Life Format 9. Enter the Quake : Quake III's MD3 Format 10. Tips, Tricks, and Methods Appendices: A: Common 3D Model Formats B: STL Vector Primer C: Going Above and Beyond

About the Author

After programming for several years, Evan Pipho discovered gamedev.net in mid-2000 and immediately became a devoted gamer. At age 17, Evan has already tackled DirectDraw, Direct3D, and OpenGL in addition to co-creating Ngine.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book begins with a good grounding on the mathematics of 3d models and covers all the main concepts of matrices and vector transformations. It also covers many of the most popular 3d model file formats, although there isn't any mention of the popular .x format. My main gripe with focus on 3d models is the lack of practical examples, yes it has demonstrations and the code for getting your models into the directx framework. But that's as far as it goes. It doesn't show you how they could be practically used in a game environment, neither does it go into detail with skeletal meshes. If you want characters with skeletons walking or animated in your game, don't look here. It's also much shorter than the other books in the series at just 200 pages. My final point; it's a nice book, it just lacks detail and follow through.
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Format: Paperback
For some reason their arnt that many books on making computer graphics, I think it assumed if you can program at a level where you can do grphics you dont need a book. the book covers what you want how to visualise the maths behind the graphics and how to code them. It comes with a cd of the code they talk about so you can cut it up and play with it but its only any good on a windows system due to everything being directx and using the windods.h liabry. being primarly a mac user this means i cant work with it on my prefered system. genraly a good book
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good as a reference 3 Feb. 2003
By RTD - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although all of the information in this book is available for free on various sites online, it's worth the small price to have it all in one bound hardcopy.
A few chapters go over the basics of matrix and vector math, and the concepts behind animating models: not essential stuff for what is essentially a model format reference book.
The core of the book describes in detail the following formats: Quake2 (MD2), Maya (OBJ), Autodesk (3DS), Half-Life (MDL) and Quake3 (MD3). All the formats except Half-Life MDL's are described in detail. The author really dropped the ball in the "Half-Life MDL" chapter: Instead of describing the format from scratch, he just tells you to use the Half-Life SDK, because "the Half-Life format is very, very complex."
One minor nit-pick: There is no mention that 16-bit and 32-bit data in binary formats are stored in little-endian format, and must be byte swapped on non-Intel machines.
Even with all this criticism, I rate the book 4 stars, because overall I am happy with the level of detail presented in the file format chapters.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fulfills its stated purpose well 13 May 2003
By Dave Astle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book covers the loading and handling of 3D models from the programmer's point of view (not the artist's, which may not be immediately obvious from the title). Like other Focus On books, it's short (checking in at just under 200 pages), but doesn't spend a lot of time on introductory material or subjects not related to the main topic.
The model formats covered by this book are Quake 2 (.md2), .obj, MilkShape, 3D Studio Max (.3ds), Half-life (.mdl), and Quake 3 (.md3). All of these formats are covered quite well, with sample code showing how to load, display and (when applicable) animate them. The exception is the Half-life format, for which he just uses the SDK, so there's no real information on the format itself. In addition to the specific formats, there are chapters on skeletal animation and useful tips on working with models.
My only real complaint is that about 1/4 of the book's pages are spent on covering vectors, matrices, quaternions, and STL vectors. Although knowledge of these topics is important for understanding the rest of the book, I'd suspect most readers will already be familiar with them. I would have preferred to have these chapters included on the CD instead, freeing up space for more useful information (detailed coverage of the Half-life format, perhaps?).
Overall, though, I was happy with the book. It's compact, inexpensive, an easy read, and it's nice to have the most common formats covered in one convenient volume. If you're looking for an introduction to using 3D models, or just want a physical reference for these formats to keep on your desk, I'd recommend it.
4.0 out of 5 stars just good. 10 Oct. 2014
By Nick Jagger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great explanation of 3d model formats like obj, mdl, md2,md3, etc. they do have bits of codes in it to show you a basic example codes and also the book came with a cd that came with trial softwares along with source codes used in the book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good beginners intro 18 Jan. 2004
By george - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An excellent starting point for somebody that knows nothing at all about 3D models, but can only be considered a stepping stone to other books that gloss over the basics.
He starts with a good intro to matrices and quaternions, followed by a good intro to modeling concepts, and then describes a few formats in detail. Unfortunately, he doesn't go into any more advanced discussion on how to put things together... i.e. how to *use* the models. A few pages are wasted explaining how to use some basic "C", but I've seen worse...
Overall, I give it four stars because, if you know nothing of the topic, it is an excellent jump start. If you do have knowledge of the topic, then you aren't the target audience.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Small, short and to the point 17 Mar. 2005
By Brian Borman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Explains some of the more common 3d models and includes an appendix with links about other formats not covered. This book only briefly explains some technologies, like skeletal modeling, and otherwise just tells you what you need to get them rendered.

Just enough to get you started.
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