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Flour Babies by [Fine, Anne]
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Flour Babies Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

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Product Description

About the Author

Anne Fine has written numerous highly acclaimed and prize-winning books for children and adults. The Tulip Touchwon the Whitbread Children's Book of the Year Award; Goggle-Eyes won the Guardian Children's Fiction Award and the Carnegie Medal; Flour Babies won the Carnegie Medal and the Whitbread Children's Book of the Year; and Bill's New Frock won a Smarties Prize. Anne Fine was named Children's Laureate in 2001 and was awarded an OBE in 2003.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 464 KB
  • Print Length: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; New Ed edition (29 Mar. 2001)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI930G
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,754 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Flour Babies is based in a school. Where an unintelligent class has to look after sacks of flour for a project. The class is doing that project because one boy thinks there will be a glorious exsplosion at the end. But will he be right?
Simon Martin is the main character in the book. He is a member of 4C. He is the only one that really likes his flour baby. Simon lives alone with his mum. At the beginning of the book Simon does not appreciate his mum. In particular when his mum refuses to look after his flour baby while he is at football
practice. but towards the end of the book he starts to realise how hard it must have been for his mum looking after him all by herself.
Because of having to look after the flour baby , Simon begins to wonder about his own father, who, left when Simon was still a baby. Simon has a lot of questions for his mum. was it his fault that his dad left? What circumstances did hisdadleave in? Simon also becomes more mature and starts to appreciate his teachers.
I enjoy the book because of the way we look ino Simon's memories.I think everyone between the ages of 9 and 12.
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Format: Paperback
We thought this book was interesting in the way that children of a certain age could learn the responsibilities of caring for a child. We thought the description put a clear thought of what was happening in your mind. The story introduces two boys (Martin Simon and Simon Martin) with different priorities. Martin Simon, an excellent straight A student is the total opposite of Simon Martin who is an errant student who is thought of as a hard-head but later in the novel he shows us his true sensitive side. Simon struggles through the project thinking of only his father who left when he was young. It is not until the very end when he realises that his father is not an issue anymore, it is only the people who stood by him that count. This book teaches us the true meaning of caring for a child at any age. This story interested us a great deal and we recommend this story to other 11-14 year olds.
By Kate Eustace and Julia Smith
Featherstone High School.
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Format: Paperback
Flour Babies can easily be read as a book about a class of boys who have to look after little bags of flour for 3 weeks as if they were babies. The story goes much deeper than that. This book deals with issues that these adolescents would be preparing to face in later life as well as being a cathartic process of self discovery for the main character. It explores the responsibilities of parenthood both in their presence and absence. Overall I found this book wonderful and as a trainee teacher, I would be happy to use this book in the classroom.
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Format: Paperback
If you like a good contemporary realistic book, then this is the book for you. Anne Fine is an award winning author who uses her fantastic vocabulary and language skills well. The Flour Babies is an emotional roller coaster with some funny characters and a heart-breaking journey through Simon Martin's life and his relationships with his family.
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Format: Paperback
Flour babies is a meaningful novel about a class of 14 year olds receiving a sack of flour each which they must look after for 4 weeks. Simon Martin's father left him when he was a baby and this flour baby helps him understand about parenting and why his father left.
Simon is a teenage slob,who doesn't pay any attention to school work what so ever until he chooses home economics in a science fair and receives a flour baby.
Simon manages to persuade hisf riends into thinking that at the end of the project they can kick they're flour babies to bits,this was because he over heard a conversation/arguement between Dr Feltham and his form tutor.
To start with he hates her but then he starts to explore his unknown past and his missing father.Simon grows to care for this flour baby although his friends think he's lost all his sanity.
He first realises that his school teachers must haveto put up with alot , looking after him and his class mates , so in a regular detention with Miss Arnott he, foronce, settles down to work instead of getting up to his usual strange antics. But this only lasts that one detention because he doesn't want to loose his reputation.
Simon next starts to think about his Dad and why he left. He satrtsto ask him self a lot of questions like
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Format: Paperback
It all starts with a boy called Simon Martin who is in class 4C, the bottom class at school. The whole class is given the task of looking after imaginary babies made out of bags of flour. Simon manages to convince the whole class that there is going to be a "glorious explosion" at the end of the project for the school science fair. The whole class has little enthusiasm but the thought of a flour fight at the end keeps them going for much longer. Their teacher tries to encourage them but gets fed up with the flour babies and takes them away after only eighteen days. Simon manages to save his flour baby from the bin and keeps it until he has his own glorious explosion!
The novel has a number of important morals, including don't give teachers a hard time and that sometimes things happen for no reason.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I vividly remember loving this book when I was younger. I was so happy when it was picked for our challenge, as I absolutely have fond memories of it. Whilst I still enjoyed it and thought it was a sweet read, I didn’t love it as much as I remembered. Ah. Adulthood!

Flour Babies is about Simon Martin and his friends in 4C. They have a project of taking on the responsibility of a small sack of flour as part of a ‘Child Development’ project. The Flour Baby comes with many different rules and regulations! The aim of the project is to get the students to think about responsibility and parenthood. Our main protagonist Simon finds himself beginning to really care for his Flour Baby despite his initial reservations. Simon unexpectedly finds himself coming to terms with his own absent father.

The absent father element is something that I didn’t recall from my childhood readings of Flour Babies. Perhaps because my father was absent (due to being in the army) so much, I didn’t really see it as anything unusual. I really liked how Anne Fine didn’t shy away from the absent father in the story. So many children can relate to this!

The language in Flour Babies is a little dated for our modern day children, but I do think children would still get something out of this book.
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