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The Fleet Air Arm Handbook 1939-45 Paperback – 16 Jul 2003

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Sutton Publishing Ltd; New edition edition (16 July 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0750934301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0750934305
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 1.6 x 26 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,222,963 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

David Wragg is the author of fourteen books on aviation history, including Snatching Defeat from the Jaws of Victory. (Sutton,2000, Carrier Combat (Sutton, 1998) and Bombers (Sutton, 1999). A former journalist specialising in transport and defence, he has written for many national newspapers. He lives in Scotland.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Mr Wragg has written a wonderful survey of the Fleet Air Arm in WWII. The first half of the book covers combat operations (in general terms) and life in the FAA. The latter half contains a brief synopsis of every squadron, wing, aircraft carrier, and shore base.
It's the latter half that makes this book so worthwhile. Well done Mr Wragg!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very useful due to the photos. it give a lot in the space, possibly some more first hand source content would have been nice but we cant have everything
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This should have been a good book as the premise behind it is sound but unfortunately the author seems to have pulled his information from very poor secondary sources. Even before I had finished reading the first chapter the amount of incorrect historical information I had noticed was shocking and none of the information contained in the book can be considered trustworthy.

An example of the errors contained within the book is the authors treatment of the terms of the Washington Naval treaty. He makes statements that the RN and USN received a "maximum fleet tonnage of 525,000 tons each" and that the fact that aircraft carriers received 135,000 tons of this 525,000 ton allotment showed how important naval aviation had become.

While the RN and USN were indeed allowed to build up to 135,000 tons of aircraft carriers each, the 525,000 ton figure was not the maximum fleet tonnage allowed to both navy's. It applied solely to the tonnage limit on gun-armed capital ships and beyond the carrier and capital ship tonnage limits there was no limit on the total numbers of other ships that each navy could build so long as no other ship type exceeded 10,000 tons displacement.

The author also refers to a separate tonnage allotment for battlecruisers when in reality Washington lumped battleships and battlecruisers together as capital ships and the 525,000 ton limit regarded both types as one.

This example is just the tip of the iceberg of the faults contained within this book and this horrible mangling of historical events which results in the birth of myths which are then commonly regarded as fact should not be encouraged and for the sake of historical integrity this book and books like it should be avoided at all costs.
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Format: Paperback
excellent copy of an interesting book from one of the most exciting peiods during the sedcond world war and that's all from me
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