Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Flashback Hardcover – 7 Jul 2011

3.1 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews

See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£8.89 £0.01

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus (7 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857381245
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857381248
  • Product Dimensions: 16.7 x 24.4 x 5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,032,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

'This is Simmons doing detective noir with an SF sheen ... Simmons has, as ever, created a compelling, believable cast of characters, but it's not really Nick Bottom's travails that make this such a startling read. His trajectory is tightly plotted and there's an emotional undertow to his actions that's easy to empathise with, sure, but it's the world Simmons has made that's the thing here, a world that sits right next to ours and might actually be our world if we're not too careful - and it's not too late. This is a provocative, frightening book ... Flashback is a fascinating read and many, no doubt, will be outraged at what it suggests. It's a book that will stay with you days after you finish it, chewing over its implications and precedents; but it's also a thrilling detective novel with a grand compelling mystery at its centre and more heart than you might think' SFX.

'...nothing will prepare you for Flashback, a book as relentlessly compelling and unsettling as it punishing to read ... Simmons accomplishes this mood so well that it's difficult to fault the book for essentially excelling at creating atmosphere and complex history for this universe' Sci-Fi Now.

From the Inside Flap

America, 2036. A wasteland in economic ruin. Terrorism and ultra-violence plague a once powerful society, whose people's only escape is to numb themselves on flashback - a euphoric yet cripplingly addictive drug that allows its users to revisit happier, past experiences. Ex-cop and addict Nick Bottom has seen flashback destroy his life. All he has left are the flash-induced memories of his beloved wife, taken from him in a fatal car accident. In despair, and at rock bottom, Nick receives a proposition. Powerful magnate Hiroshi Nakamura wants his services and, in particular, his memories. As head of the original investigation into the murder of Nakamura's son - an unsolved and seemingly impossible mystery - Nick's flashbacks now, six years later, hold the key to solving what was the greatest failed case of his career. This mission will bring Nick nearer to a hidden truth, one he may not be prepared to face, and will place his life in ever-increasing danger. Flashback: Dan Simmons' vision f a terrifying not-too-distant future; his fusion of awe-inspiring imagination, heart-thumping pace and surging plot cementing his status as one of the most versatile and visionary talents of his generation.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Don't listen to the left wing babies, this is a brilliant book, that at heart is just a great detective story. I hope and doubt that many of Simmons ideas about the future are not realised but it is fascinating stuff in my opinion nonetheless.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I absolutely adored the Ilium/Olympus series and The Terror, so I was very excited to get my hands on this. Unfortunately, Flashback really doesn't rank up there with Simmons' best.

It's a decent thriller, for the most part, although not as compelling as The Terror, and it lacks the creativity and literary bravery of Ilium. Most annoying, though, is the regular authorial intrusion. Characters keep interrupting the story to pontificate on how Obama and social programs ruined the country, or how Islam should be feared. It's like being sat next to a bore at a dinner party. You just want to enjoy the story, but they keep interrupting the tale with another rant.

I don't care what Simmons personal political views are, but as a writing teacher (as well as an exceptionally talented writer) he should know better than to ruin a story with lecturing.
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I'm not a fan of US right-wing politics. Nor do I think well of Dan Simmons's personal politics -- and neither would be worth mentioning if that scatter-shot set of nationalist fear-mongering beliefs weren't reflected so strongly in this book. Nearly every chapter had an awkward, suspension-of-disbelief shattering callback to the current events of 2008-2010. I felt physically thrown out of the story every time I read about Obama's campaign, or a mosque at Ground Zero, or that global warming hoax, or...well, you name it -- if Glenn Beck has cried about it or Fox News has pontificated over it, it's here.

If it were simply a matter of world-building, that would be fine. I found nothing wrong with the future he painted; indeed, it was an interesting and thought-provoking scenario with the quirks and curve-balls I expect from a Simmons novel. Even the politics themselves aren't the issue -- it's the heavy-handedness, the constant intrusion of the author shattering the experience.

Authorial intrusion on this scale is especially obnoxious because Dan Simmons knows better. One quote that he's often referenced in his own Writing Well series comes from Gustave Flaubert: "In his work, the artist should be like God in creation: invisible and all-powerful. He should be felt everywhere and seen nowhere."

Unfortunately you see Dan Simmons shining through every time a character in the 2030s, in a bankrupted, drug-addicted, drawn-and-quartered United States, ruminates over the concerns and uniquely American fears of the present day. This never-ending interruption very nearly ruined what would have otherwise been another spectacular work from a spectacular writer.

I say "very nearly" for good reason.
Read more ›
5 Comments 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Starts so well and and has so much potential, but then turns into a thin veiled podium for the author and his political beliefs. The author cant seem to help himself from interrupting the narrative with what essentially amounts to a rant about left wing social polices and its extremely jarring to say the least
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I'm about to do something I usually never do. I'm about to put down a book while still in the middle of reading it, and walk away from it, never to return.

The book in question is by Dan Simmons, an author who has written a slew of frankly excellent books which are widely, and justly, regarded as among the best SF books you can find. In particular, his "Hyperion Cantos" books, published from 1989 to 1997, are top notch works.

But this book, "Flashback", is different. This book is set in a near future, and it shows features of Simmons' personal and political views bleeding through into his story, and not in any useful or charming way. It's not a work of literature, it is a screed. Every page or so, there is some racist digression, a passage that bleeds venom towards non-whites and non-Christians, in one form or another, and a deeply visceral hatred towards those whites that collaborated with racial and religious enemies to ruin the strength of the white and Christian USA.

This book is a racist, right-wing rant. I might be able to finish it, if it were also well-written. But Simmons is preachy and digressive throughout, dumping expository racist passages into the middle of scenes. It would be embarrassingly poorly written for an unknown author. For an established author, it is catastrophically inept.

Simmons, with this book, shows himself to be full-on Tea Party racist (and it's a fair bet that he is banging his drum for Trump these days, though that is purely a conjecture on my part). His book is no more readable than one of Rand's rants, masquerading as literature, is.

And with that, I put it down. I may never read another book by Simmons.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I rather liked it. It's not a fable, or allegory, or political polemic, but a novel set in a world of the author's design. I can see why it would rub people up the wrong way, but if you choose to take a fictional novel as a manifesto, rather than a piece of (thought-stimulating) entertainment, then there we are. It's got good bits about weapons, ninjas, drugs, Islam, truckers, Japs and family. If you like 'The Gone Away World' by Nick Harkaway then you should like this, and vice-versa.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category