Buy Used
£1.22
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Flamboya Tree: Memories of a Mother's Wartime Courage Hardcover – 1 Apr 2002

4.4 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 1 Apr 2002
£1.22
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375506217
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375506215
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.2 x 20.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,067,173 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Advance praise for
The Flamboya Tree
"The Flamboya Tree is that rare treasure--a memoir so powerful and
vivid that it draws the past into the present and
makes us all history's creatures."
--Amanda Foreman, author of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
"Sometimes the history of war hides its best stories, its fine,
quiet stories. The Flamboya Tree is such a story, with some kinship to Nicholas Gage's Eleni, and, in the same extraordinary way,
is about the triumph of love and compassion and decency."
--Alan Furst, author of Kingdom of Shadows
"Surefooted and bighearted, Kelly's narrative offers testimony to
the sustaining power of dignity and courage in the face of
impossible circumstance."
--Beth Kephart, author of A Slant of Sun
"As Clara Kelly honors her mother's memory, we are reminded that
not all the heroes of World War II faced the bullets of the battlefield."
--James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers
"The Flamboya Tree is like a bright jewel found in the dust of
fading history. I was bowled over by this book."
--Carolyn See, author of The Handyman
"Simply told, deeply felt, Kelly's The Flamboya Tree shows us
that adversity can transform our lives into courageous,
life-affirming works of art."
--Gwyn Hyman Rubio, author of Icy Sparks

"From the Hardcover edition."

Advance praise for
The Flamboya Tree

"The Flamboya Tree is that rare treasure--a memoir so powerful and
vivid that it draws the past into the present and
makes us all history's creatures."
--Amanda Foreman, author of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire

"Sometimes the history of war hides its best stories, its fine,
quiet stories. The Flamboya Tree is such a story, with some kinship to Nicholas Gage's Eleni, and, in the same extraordinary way,
is about the triumph of love and compassion and decency."
--Alan Furst, author of Kingdom of Shadows

"Surefooted and bighearted, Kelly's narrative offers testimony to
the sustaining power of dignity and courage in the face of
impossible circumstance."
--Beth Kephart, author of A Slant of Sun

"As Clara Kelly honors her mother's memory, we are reminded that
not all the heroes of World War II faced the bullets of the battlefield."
--James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers

"The Flamboya Tree is like a bright jewel found in the dust of
fading history. I was bowled over by this book."
--Carolyn See, author of The Handyman

"Simply told, deeply felt, Kelly's The Flamboya Tree shows us
that adversity can transform our lives into courageous,
life-affirming works of art."
--Gwyn Hyman Rubio, author of Icy Sparks


"From the Hardcover edition."

Advance praise for
The Flamboya Tree
The Flamboya Tree is that rare treasure a memoir so powerful and
vivid that it draws the past into the present and
makes us all history s creatures.
Amanda Foreman, author of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
Sometimes the history of war hides its best stories, its fine,
quiet stories. The Flamboya Tree is such a story, with some kinship to Nicholas Gage s Eleni, and, in the same extraordinary way,
is about the triumph of love and compassion and decency.
Alan Furst, author of Kingdom of Shadows
Surefooted and bighearted, Kelly s narrative offers testimony to
the sustaining power of dignity and courage in the face of
impossible circumstance.
Beth Kephart, author of A Slant of Sun
As Clara Kelly honors her mother s memory, we are reminded that
not all the heroes of World War II faced the bullets of the battlefield.
James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers
The Flamboya Tree is like a bright jewel found in the dust of
fading history. I was bowled over by this book.
Carolyn See, author of The Handyman
Simply told, deeply felt, Kelly s The Flamboya Tree shows us
that adversity can transform our lives into courageous,
life-affirming works of art.
Gwyn Hyman Rubio, author of Icy Sparks

"From the Hardcover edition."" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A shocking and moving war memoir told from the perspective of a young child interned in a brutally violent Japanese war camp during World War Two. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas meets Rabbit-Proof Fence in this startling and unique autobiography of a childhood spent in captivity. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As the author says, this story needed to be recorded, not just because it is in itself an extraordinary true story but because many in Japan today would rather pretend this never happened.

Although it is tragic in parts, it is an inspiring book because of the courage and faith shown in the darkest of circumstances by the author's mother.

In short, as a mother caught up in today's materialistic and selfish world, this story made me reassess my priorities and rethink what is really important.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
An amazing, inspiring and incredible book. Beautifully written from a child's perspective the book describes the years Clara's family (her mother, Clara and two brothers) spent in a Japenese concentration camp. At times I was reading with tears rolling down my cheeks but always with a sense of admiration for all the family and especially their mother. Clara's mother truly was inspiring and kept the family together through the most atrocious happenings. Her children all went on to have happy and successful lives even having spent their most formative years in such terrible conditions and I believe this is a tribute to their mother's unconditional love and pride in them.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the first hand account of a mother and her three children surviving internment by the Japanese during the Second World War. It is a remarkable testament to the crueltyand inhumanity to which people can descend and to the courage and resiliance of a motherin the face of the most terrible adversity.After reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North (Booker winning Japanese work camp novel) that I didn't really like I struggled to remember the name and find this book which I had partially heard on Radio 4 a decade ago. What I didn't like about the novel was the secondhandness of the sensationalism, what I had remembered for a decade and did like about this book was the authenticity of this first hand account. It is not the best written book ever, because the writer seems to be capturing what she remembered experiencing as a very young child, no more no less. It reads quickly and is very rewarding. I am reminded and chastened by the thought that the world is still full of mothers who struggle to keep their children alive and always will be.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book although it was hard to read some of the details of the treatment of the prisoners in the Japanese POW camp. What shone through in this book was the love the family had for one another and the way their mother always put them first and held the family together during a time of such suffering.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Taking into account the almost miraculous memory that the author must have (she was a very young child at the time), this book was a fascinating insight into a childhood in captivity. The descriptions are vivid and the portrayals of camp life are quaintly skewed to a child's perspective which precludes much of the cruelty which must have been far more apparent to adults in the camp. That said, the portrayal of the entire family and the sacrifices made by the mother are touching and provide and insight into a moment in history where ordinary people led extraordinary lives.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 18 July 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book makes you want to pull your kids close and count your blessings. The strengh, determination and guts that this mother had to keep her children safe, when all around her chaos and deprivation were the norm is inspiring. A true definition of "mothers love"
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Personally I found the book slightly antiseptic, the prose unimaginitve and plain. Had it been my first experience of learning about life in a Japanese prison camp, on balance it doesn't come across as being that bad, I never felt disgust at the prison guards for instance, or scared for the prisoners, or sickened at what they suffered. Clara's descriptions didn't achieve that.
But then my imagination kicked in, scenes from other books I'd read, documentaries I'd seen kept reminding me of what it what really like, and filled in the bits where Clara failed.
She partly fails because she focuses on the good times the children had, flying kites, playing in the flooded ditches etc.
I decided that there was three reasons why Clara was unemotional about describing camp life.
The first, applies to many people who have survived the horrors of war, whether soldiers or civilians. They never talk about those experiences, ever. Yes, they may just brush the surface, casually mention they been to Italy/Burma/France or whereever, and joke about the food, but never any insights as to what it was really like.
The second reason is I think Clara relied on distant memory. She was between the ages of 4 and 8, and was probably too young too remember enough details and the chronological order of events that happened over those 4 years. The memoirs read as if a story has been made of a number of events and the result is the narrative is not always convincing. Perhaps its her way of dealing with the horror she went through, by taking a step back from those experiences, but to me it doesn't feel as if they happened to her, some of the emotion is missing.
The final reason is a tribute to Clara's Mother. This is the point that the book is trying to convey.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback