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The Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy : A New Translation with Introductions, Commentary: 1 (The Schocken Bible) Paperback – 1 Jan 1920

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Product details

  • Paperback: 1055 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Inc; 1st pbk. ed edition (1 Jan. 1920)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805211195
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805211191
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 5.1 x 24.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 741,951 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A binding religious text, a historical document of the first importance, and a work of great literary imagination." --Edward Hirsch, "New York Times Book Review"
"Fox's translation has the rare virtue of making constantly visible in English the Hebraic quality of the original, challenging preconceptions of what the Bible is really like. A bracing protest against the bland modernity of all the recent English versions of the Bible." --Robert Alter, professor of comparative literature, University of California, Berkeley
"No serious Bible reader--whether Jewish, Christian, or secular--can afford to ignore this volume." --Jon D. Levenson, Harvard Divinity School

From the Inside Flap

Widely acclaimed by Bible scholars and theologians of every denomination, Everett Fox's masterful translation re-creates the echoes, allusions, alliterations, and wordplays of the Hebrew original. Together with its extensive commentary and illuminating notes, this unique translation draws the reader closer to the authentic living voice of the Bible.

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By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 22 Dec. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Schocken Press has undertaken an ambitious project, to retranslate the Bible into modern language capturing the sound and quality of idiom of the original languages as much as possible. The first volume of this project is available in The Five Books of Moses, Shocken Bible: Volume I, translated and with commentary by Everett Fox.
'Based upon principles developed by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, this new English translation restores the poetics of the Hebrew original--the echoes, allusions, alliterations, and word-plays that rhetorically underscore its meaning and are intrinsic to a text meant to be read aloud and heard.' The underlying premise of most translations of the Bible have been to clarify the meaning of the text. While this is certainly not overlooked here, it can be the case that in the pursuit of textual clarity, the ability to make it audibly intelligible gets lost -- a lot of passages from the New Revised Standard Version, for instance, are so precise in construction that they defy oral expression.
Fox says in his Translator's Preface: 'I have presented the text in English dress but with a Hebraic voice.' Careful attention has been given to rhythm and sound. Too many English translations overlook the auditory quality of the words, and while striving to capture the idea of the text, they miss the crucial 'hearing cues' that an oral rendering would give the listener.
To this end, the text is printed as if it were in blank verse (save where a poetic style was already present and could be carried forward). Proper nouns (the names of persons and places) retain their Hebraic forms; odd, though, that the title of the book is The Five Books of Moses rather than The Five Books of Moshe. Also, a principle of the 'leading-word' is employed here.
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Format: Hardcover
Building on Buber's and Rosenzweig's German translation of the five books of Moses (what for Jews is the Torah, and for Christians the Old Testament), Fox creates the first Bible translation which picks up in English the cadences and rhythms and word-plays of the original. A classic simple demonstration of this is to look at his translation of chapter 29 of Genesis, in which the naming of each of Leah's sons reflects the process of their birth, and mirrors, within the hebrew, words used earlier within their respective verses. Traditional translations fail to convey this information; in consequence an enormous amount of the primary story is lost. Overall: this should be the Bible of choice for anyone who can't read the original hebrew - but would like to.
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By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 28 April 2006
Format: Paperback
Schocken Press has undertaken an ambitious project, to retranslate the Bible into modern language capturing the sound and quality of idiom of the original languages as much as possible. The first volume of this project is available in The Five Books of Moses, Shocken Bible: Volume I, translated and with commentary by Everett Fox.

'Based upon principles developed by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, this new English translation restores the poetics of the Hebrew original--the echoes, allusions, alliterations, and word-plays that rhetorically underscore its meaning and are intrinsic to a text meant to be read aloud and heard.' The underlying premise of most translations of the Bible have been to clarify the meaning of the text. While this is certainly not overlooked here, it can be the case that in the pursuit of textual clarity, the ability to make it audibly intelligible gets lost -- a lot of passages from the New Revised Standard Version, for instance, are so precise in construction that they defy oral expression.

Fox says in his Translator's Preface: 'I have presented the text in English dress but with a Hebraic voice.' Careful attention has been given to rhythm and sound. Too many English translations overlook the auditory quality of the words, and while striving to capture the idea of the text, they miss the crucial 'hearing cues' that an oral rendering would give the listener.

To this end, the text is printed as if it were in blank verse (save where a poetic style was already present and could be carried forward). Proper nouns (the names of persons and places) retain their Hebraic forms; odd, though, that the title of the book is The Five Books of Moses rather than The Five Books of Moshe. Also, a principle of the 'leading-word' is employed here.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This Book if you can call it a Book, this section of the Bible by Everett Fox, was recommended by a friend, and so I bought it, and I find it to be an easy read, with a great deal of explanation at the foot of each page and also the authors explains something about the subject of the text you are about to read.
I have struggled in the past to read the Bible because I would get Bogged down in it, but I find this Book all that my friend, Ross, says it was, I'm pleased I have it !!
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Format: Paperback
Until recently, I was unaware of the competing versions of the Bible by Biblical scholars Dr. Robert Alter and Dr. Everett Fox. Both have authored many books and critical essays about the Bible, culminating with parallel academic versions of The Torah (interestingly, they both chose the title, "The Five Books of Moses."), biography of David's life (both chose to use 1,2 Samuel) and both offered competing translations of Genesis.

The good news is, is that both men offer surprisingly interesting renditions of these books. I was especially please to recently receive Dr. Fox' version of the Torah after having Dr. Alters for two months.

Both books offer slightly different translations along with the running commentary, Dr. Fox' reserves most of his at the beginning of each book, but what stands out is perhaps cadence.

Dr. Fox' is a bit easier to read. Yes, he does substitute/ replace the English/ Latin names with the original Hebrew names. I also found his line of reasoning an interesting contrast to Dr. Alter-- 21st century Talmudic debate!

The soft cover is very durable, but it is heavy to carry. It is also printed in large fonts.

If you're like me, not crazy about the JPS standard version and you want a lively Chumash, I strongly recommend this version. Do I recommend this over Dr. Alter's? No. It's like hearing "Our Love is Here To Stay" and loving Sinatra's version, but also loving Louie Armstrong's.
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