FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Fishing in Utopia: Sweden... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Fishing in Utopia: Sweden and the Future That Disappeared Paperback – 4 May 2009

3.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£3.76 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Fishing in Utopia: Sweden and the Future That Disappeared
  • +
  • The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia
Total price: £16.48
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books (4 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847080812
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847080813
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 135,900 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'... Mr Brown's prose is as clear and bewitching as the lake waters which he learns to fish ... Readers who know the Nordic countries will delight in the author's keen ear and eye for the nuances of language, landscape and social customs' - Economist' - he is a deft writer with a real descriptive talent and a humorous touch - this is an affectionate and insightful portrait, offering a much deeper understanding of the country than the usual, often politically motivated, tendency to stereotype' - Financial Times'Fishing in Utopia is a lament for a lost Eden. But it is more than that. Essentially it is a story of modern rootlessness and the search for something to believe in. The fact that that something turns out, absurdly, to be fishing only makes it more tragic. I can see it becoming a cult book, and not just among anglers' - Sunday Times 'His evocations of his early years in the country are miracles of sensuous recollection' - Telegraph

About the Author

Andrew Brown writes for the Guardian and is the editor of their website on religious affairs. He also contributes to Prospect and the New Statesman and writes and presents Analysis programmes for BBC Radio 4. His other books include The Darwin Wars and In the Beginning Was the Worm.


Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author spent some time in Sweden as a child,and again
in his 20's when he was married to a Swedish woman,and working
in a timber mill.When his marriage broke up ,after the birth
of his son, he moved back to England.In this wise and balanced
book he returns to Sweden to explore his relationship with the
country.As he endeavours to define Sweden we learn of his childhood experiences,his working class life in the timber mill,his fishing,
and of the desolate beauty of Northern Sweden.He considers
Sweden's 'social experiment' portraying its faults as the country,like many others in Europe tries to come to terms with immigration and the disintegration of rural life.He does this -respectfully-and despite its shortcomings ,he regains his affection for much of what is Swedish. A wonderfully written fascinating read.
Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Fishing in Utopia is a relatively short and easy book to read. It is in part autobiographical, a tribute to fishing, and a series of journalistic essays told in a 'journey' form to find Sweden's past, present and possible future. It is written in recollection of the author's youthful heydays, and interpreted with the mature discernment of a man some years on that has now a measure of accorded wisdom and seniority as a well known Fleet Street writer. All these different aspects are artfully interlaced into a well-written and unique style that gave me the impression I was reading a mysterious travelogue or cult road movie, forever moving towards the ultimate clue that would unlock the cultural secrets of this fascinating country.

Andrew Brown tells his story of living in Sweden with a Swedish partner (who he met in England) in the 1960s, after the break-up when his career as a British journalist took off, to the near present day when he re-journeys in a Saab to discover if Olof Palme's dream had sustained. Throughout a chronological structure, is weaved a passion for fishing - the author's commune with nature, and possible existentialist and cosmological solace. I am sorry to admit that I found my concentration slipping at repeated references to the finer intricacies of fishing technology.

Though the book is in essence an autobiography, Brown's writing style appeared to shield his personal reflections and those close to him, which has a somewhat noble aspect. However a blanket of privacy seemed to pervade the book, and I was left with the impression that the author is an intensely insular man, in love with his fishing retreats, and still an outsider.

Where this book excels is in its journalistic leanings that provide many commentaries on Swedish life.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The author spent some time in Sweden as a child,
and again in his 20's when he was married to a Swedish
woman,and working in a timber mill.When his marriage
broke up,after the birth of his son,he moved back to
England.
In this wise and balanced book he returns to Sweden to
explore his relationship with the country.As he endeavours
to define Sweden we learn of his childhood experiences,his
working class life in the timber mill.his fishing,and of
the desolate beauty of Northern Sweden.He considers Sweden's
'social experiment'-portraying its faults as the country,
like many others in Europe,tries to come to terms with
immigration and the disintegration of rural life.He does this-
respectfully-and despite its shortcomings,he regains his affection
for much of what is Swedish .A wonderfully written fascinating read.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author rather fancies himself at a lot of things: poet, expert on Sweden, most knowledgeable fisherman, accomplished speaker and writer of Swedish, bon viveur..... The trouble is that I don't think he has grown up; he has remained a child, and an obviously immature one, at heart. The problems begin for me with his early life: we are not told why he was expelled from school and then, very surprisingly for someone who fancies himself later as a bit of an intellectual, he goes off to work in a care home. Even more surprisingly, he takes an immediate shine to a fellow worker who happens to be Swedish (but nowhere does he explain her attraction to him), spends a night in a sleeping bag with her outside and, hey presto, they are a couple. Having tired of his Swedish wife much later (or she of him) he picks up a new English wife surprisingly quickly - again, such important details in a person's biography are simply not explained. For someone who takes pleasure later in informing his readers of his prowess in teaching English to the Swedes (without any qualifications in this field whatsoever) it is unsettling to be told in earlier chapters how little contact he has with English and how divorced from his mother-tongue he has become. He strikes me as being weird in many different ways. Here's an example of a particularly chilling sentence on page 76: "I liked killing things a great deal." In 21st century Britain you can be put away for a long time expressing such opinions. I could go on detailing all the inconsistencies and inconsequentalities in this book but this would be to rub too much salt into the wounds. Let me finish, however, with this observation.Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback