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Finally, Sunday!: (Vivement Dimanche!) [DVD] [1983]

4.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Fanny Ardant, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Jean-Pierre Kalfon, Philippe Laudenbach, Philippe Morier-Genoud
  • Directors: François Truffaut
  • Writers: François Truffaut, Charles Williams, Suzanne Schiffman, Jean Aurel
  • Producers: François Truffaut, Armand Barbault
  • Format: PAL, Widescreen, Black & White, Subtitled
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: 2entertain
  • DVD Release Date: 25 Sept. 2006
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000HBJRR4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 42,635 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Francois Truffaut's final film is comedy thriller with a Hitchcockian theme. Shot in the style of a classic American thriller - in crisp black and white - a company boss is accused of murdering his wife and her lover, and the evidence seems to support this. Whilst he is hiding from the police, his secretary takes on the role of detective and she uncovers illicit love affairs, prostitution rings and skeletons in everyone's closets before she uncovers the real culprit.

Customer Reviews

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By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 2 Jan. 2007
Format: DVD
Back in 1983 I saw a screening of at the London Film Festival that was supposed to be introduced by Francois Truffaut. On the day an apologetic Fanny Ardant turned up instead, apologizing that the director was feeling a little ill and was not up to travelling: in fact, he had just been diagnosed with the brain tumour that would kill him a few months later, and Vivemant Dimanche! aka Finally, Sunday/Confidentially Yours would turn out to be his last film. It works better on the big screen than the small, but it's still an immensely likeable little number that brings Francois Truffaut's career almost full circle to the kind of black and white semi-noir he championed as a critic. It's one of Truffaut's most purely cinematic films - while much of it is dialogue driven, there are few of the awkward literary conceits that he would resort to in some of his "tell, don't show" movies like Two English Girls, instead letting the character interaction and the loving black and white visuals speak for themselves. Most of all, it has a real sense of fun that even a brief melancholy reflection on the difference between death - something definite - and murder - something almost abstract - can detract from, whether it's Fanny Ardant's knocking out a suspect with a miniature Eiffel Tower, treating the fugitive Jean-Louis Trintignant to a view of her legs as she passes the window to the office he is hiding in or carrying out an investigation in wildly inappropriate attire, and there's a great joke about Paths of Glory. It goes a little over the top at the end, but by then you'll have had so much fun you'll gladly forgive it almost anything.Read more ›
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By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 May 2015
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
A light whodunnit in which the lovely Fanny Ardant tracks down the truth behind claims her boss murdered his wife. Set firmly in a Maigret world of clubs, heavies and working girls, and with a Hitchcockian tone as Ardant plays a Katherine Hepburn role this is never going to be a realistic film noir. Its romantic end seemed particularly unbelievable (though it fitted the off-screen romance between star and director) and Truffaut seemed to have deliberately played Ardant against shorter male leads which gives a Sigourney Weaver feel to the whole thing.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I just wanted to answer the question raised in the preceding review -- Why "Finally" and why "Sunday"?

The film was based on the novel "The Long Saturday Night" by Charles Williams. Towards the end of the film, Barbara (Fanny Ardant) asks Julian Vercel (Trintignant) to take her away with him. He says that he needs another 24 hours. She says; "J'ai hâte d'étre à dimanche" (I can't wait for Sunday).

Vivement in French means "in a lively manner". The film title "Vivement Dimanche!" would usually be translated as "Roll On Sunday", but that might be taken to mean a roll (in the hay) on Sunday. Hence, I would guess, the change.
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By Bluebell TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Jan. 2008
Format: DVD
This is a crime detection film full of surprises and humour. It never flags and holds ones attention the whole way through. Fanny Ardant is excellent. I've more often seen her in serious roles, but she's excellent in this light-hearted romp of a film.
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Format: DVD
Vivement dimanche! (1983) is François Truffaut's last film, a série noire picture like his Tirez sur le pianiste (1960), La mariée était en noir (1968), La sirène du Mississippi (1969), and Une belle fille comme moi (1972). The script, after the novel The Long Saturday Night by Charles Williams, was by Jean Aurel, Suzanne Schiffman and François Truffaut. Turned in black and white - cameraman was Néstor Almendros - three quarters at night, and half the time in pouring rain, it recreates the film noir genre better than his La mariée était en noir.

The latter film had experienced a problem with colour, requested by producers and notably co-producing television stations. Truffaut, after the success of his recent Le dernier Métro (1980), managed to put his foot down this time. Also, the casting of Jeanne Moreau, by general agreement did not fit the bill (otherwise, she remains a top actrice); with Vivement dimanche!, Fanny Ardent, who was also Truffaut's wife, did fit the bill perfectly, and so did Jean-Louis Trintignant as her employer.

The film was shot at the most southerly city of Provence, Hyères, which is actually never mentioned by name. It still catches the old Hyères, before its city centre modernisation and the destruction of the old movie theatre. Like Agnès Varda's Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962) - in this case with Paris - Truffaut's film becomes a documentary about its shooting location. In the film, the city is meant to be on the Côte d'Azur, but it is always referred to as "la ville" rather than by any (other) name.

Trintignant, in the story, is one by one accused of three murders, none of which he committed.
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