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Final Cut [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.1 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

Price: £5.91
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LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent The Final Cut on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
£5.91 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Lions Gate Home Entertainment
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00079HZOS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 181,530 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Omar Naim's film is startlingly different than a conventional science fiction film. It's a compelling fable that offers a vision of a world where memory implants record all moments of a person's life. Postmortem, these memories are removed and edited by a cutter into a reel depicting the life of the departed for a commemorative ceremony, called a Rememory.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film could have been so brilliant, it's so frustrating to watch. The idea of the film is inspired, the acting is faultless and the direction and look of the film was superb.

But the story went absolutely no where and just as you think the story IS going somewhere, the film ends.

What a massive waste of time and potential. It's such a shame.
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Format: DVD
I really liked The Final Cut. It may not have enough excitement to appeal to some viewers, but it is intense in its own narrow, low-key fashion. The story takes place in a futuristic setting, but rookie writer/director Omar Naim doesn't approach the story from a what-if science fiction angle; this is really the story of one man's inner soul and how one significant memory can haunt you even as it is shaping your destiny.
The story is centered on a fascinating premise - that one's memories can be recorded and played back after the individual's death. The Zoe chip makes this possible; it's a synthetic implant that grows along with you as it records every single moment of your life. After your death, a sort of highlight reel of your most significant memories is put together and shown in a special Rememory service for all your family and friends to watch. Condensing someone's life into a couple of hours is a tough job, and it takes a talented professional cutter to do the job right. Alan Hackman (Williams) is one of the best cutters out there. He sees everything from each person's life, including some pretty awful stuff, but he gives the family the good memories they yearn for. There are plenty of protesters out there opposed to the Zoe chip, including one of Alan's old colleagues. Like leftist protest groups everywhere, these guys have no problem resorting to intimidation and violence - they only worry about the ethics of their opponents, not their own. Everything comes to a head when one of the bigshots behind the Zoe chip dies. Hackman has the job of cutting the Rememory, but the protestors want the data in order to pin something on the dead guy and bring down the company.
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Format: DVD
I have always been impressed by Robin Williams in his ‘serious’ films – Insomnia, One Hour Photo, The Fisher King. In this intriguing SF movie he again excels, this time as a ‘cutter’, who extracts good memories from a deceased’s ‘zoeimplant’, a microchip which records everything experienced by a person and is implanted at birth at the wishes of their parents. The ethics of the implantation and editing of memory are explored as Williams skilfully includes (at the request of loved ones) only the good ‘rememories’ at the funeral ceremony. This cautionary tale is very reminiscent of themes addressed by Philip K. Dick and is well worth seeking out.
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By Mr. Joe HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Jan. 2006
Format: DVD
THE FINAL CUT is relentlessly dark and somber. I found myself wishing for a cameo by Mork, or perhaps even Mindy, to lighten the mood.
It's sometime in the future. Affluent parents can have an implant placed in their unborn child's brain that'll record all the sights and sounds seen and heard during that individual's life from birth until death. Then, after death, the implant's data are able to be downloaded into a computer as a series of scenes sequentially numbered according to the person's age in years, days and hours. Those vignettes can be edited by a "Cutter" to create a visual remembrance of the deceased. A sort of "This Is the Best of Your Life" souvenir for the survivors. Alan Hakman (Robin Williams) is such a Cutter, one of the best in the business when it comes to cleaning up a depraved life's visual record into something suitable for family viewing at the wake.
A childhood trauma involving the accidental death of a playmate, as well as the early demise of his own parents in an auto accident, have left Alan devoid of much emotion. Rather, he experiences life vicariously through his cutting jobs. According to one of the rules of the profession, a Cutter cannot have an implant. Alan discovers by chance that he has one, not being told about it by Mom and Pop before they were killed. So, the essence of the film becomes that old saw, "He who lives by the sword, dies by the sword", as Hakman comes into conflict with a renegade Cutter (James Caviezel) now running with the right-to-privacy militants that want to put the kabosh on implant technology.
Once again, Williams shows that he's an exceptional dramatic actor at the complete opposite of the spectrum from MORK AND MINDY.
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Format: DVD
Almost everyone agrees that the idea behind `The Final Cut' is pretty sound - we visit a world where people can record their entire lives via a `chip' inserted into their brain at birth. Plus we have Robin Williams in one of his `serious roles' (which I prefer him as, after watching him in The Fisher Kind, The World's Greatest Dad and - the excellent One Hour Photo).

Unfortunately, despite its intriguing premise, The Final Cut doesn't live up to expectations. Not only does Robin Williams (uncharacteristically) `phone-in' his performance, coming across as bored and uninteresting, but the film itself is about as interesting as he appears to be.

Through his work as a `cutter' (someone who splices together people's memories after they die for the benefit of their grieving relatives), he discovers some dark secrets that need to be investigated. If you read the blurb for this film, it mentions that his dark discovery leads him into danger. Well... there lies the problem - I just didn't feel the danger at any time. Maybe the film didn't have the budget to add in any sort of `chase scenes' that have become synonymous with this sort of film, but he just sort of wandered here and there for an hour and a half.

Ultimately, despite the good ideas behind the film, I just found it a bit dull, which was a shame as the idea and talent on offer should have added up to so much more.
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