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The Filth And The Fury - A Sex Pistols Film [VHS] [2000]

4.6 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Paul Cook, Steve Jones, John Lydon, Glen Matlock, Sid Vicious
  • Directors: Julien Temple
  • Producers: Amanda Temple, Anita Camarata, Eric Gardner, Jonathan Weisgal, Paul Webster
  • Language: English
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Film Four
  • VHS Release Date: 16 Jun. 2003
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004XQS0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 233,246 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Julien Temple directs this documentary profile of the Sex Pistols - Johnny Rotten (née Lydon), Glen Matlock, Paul Jones, Steve Cook and Sid Vicious - the punk band who shocked the world both with their music and their off-stage antics in the latter half of the 1970s. Including much never-before-seen material from the band members' personal archives, this film debunks many of the myths which have grown up around the Pistols, allowing them to tell their story their own way - free from the influence of controversial former manager Malcolm McLaren.

From Amazon.co.uk

While it may be true that the Internet is the new "punk" medium it's difficult to imagine any future documentaries about the Web being anywhere near as entertaining as this tale of how the Sex Pistols changed the history of music--and safety pins--forever. Directed by long-standing Pistols pal Julien Temple, who was also responsible for the band's Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle film, The Filth And The Fury is the full story from the group's struggling early days (which found them using mikes nicked from David Bowie) to the furore surrounding Sid Vicious' alleged murder of smackhead girlfriend Nancy Spungeon. Using both contemporary news footage and his own never-before-seen backstage material, Temple succeeds in not just explaining why the rise of Johnny Rotten & Co. was important but also why it was inevitable in that socio-political context, when conformity was prized above all. Also included in the film, of course, are a raft of great songs such as "Anarchy in the UK" and "Pretty Vacant" but the most memorable moments come with the new interview material which finds a guilt-stricken Rotten still beating himself up for not rescuing the now deceased Vicious from Spungeon's claws: "All's I can tell you is, yes, I can take on England but I couldn¹t take on one heroin addict." --Clark Collis

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This documentary contains an inspiring amount of footage. It's really lively and feels like it gets right to the heart of the band and the punk movement.
What I particularly enjoyed was the way it cut Malcom McClaren down to size. For years people have been saying that he "invented punk" and that the Pistols were a "projection of his fantasies" and silly things like that. But as John Lydon retorts here "I invented me, no one else did." McClaren's boastfulness blows up in his face. He's really made to look stupid, and, whether rightly or wrongly, completely selfish and ruthless.
The interviews with Lydon are funny, clever and moving in turn. When he talks about the death of Sid it's very sad. It's actually quite a tragic tale this. It's easy to forget that Sid was not just an icon but, as Lydon puts it as he tries to hold back the tears "my mate, one of the four Johns."
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Format: VHS Tape
I suppose the interested would have already sort this one out, others who really thought they knew about the Punk scene would be in for a bit of a culture shock when they watch this one. Johnny Rotten is one of the few who is qualified to corroborate the fact that 'Punk' was about individuality but to eminate the gift of being individual, PUNK was destroyed once everyone got in on the act. Drugs, managers and hangers on, 'they spoiled it' he says and you can clearly see why in this film.
Johnny, John, Paul, Sid and Glen with the help of Julien Temple brilliantly tell the tale of this band and the time in history when Britain and the World were kicked into moving those moral boundaries. They explain what happened and exactly why it HAD to happen. Fully expressive, the film is so well made, that even those who don't understand the music will appreciate and respect what it's about. I was not a Punk in the 70's, but a TRUE ROOTS ROCKERS Casual girl, totally 'ism'd' about my Roots/Lovers music. It seems I missed out on a lot of fun, this film is really a must if you're the least bit curious about the REAL PUNK SCENE.
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Format: DVD
This is not only one of the best documentaries that I've ever seen, but ranks up there with the best films I've seen full stop. This Julien Temple made documentary puts to shame the cartoonish mish mash of falsities and self aggrandizement that is Malcolm Maclarens 'The great Rock 'N' Roll Swindle'. There is some fantastic early footage here that I've not seen before - check out the Pistols doing 'No Feelings' in the studio - Rotten is at his scathing, pranksterish best. And is there any image so basically cool - Rock 'N' Roll - as that of Rotten and the Pistols singing 'God Save The Queen' on the riverboat during the Queens silver jubilee celebrations? It's also great to hear him speaking of his London Irish childhood and of the era in which the pistols formed. Whoever thought that Johnny Rotten was influenced by, among other things, Vaudeville, and Ken Dodd? Also, if you can manage to hold back the tears at the end when Johnny is interviewed about the death of Sid Vicious then your stronger than me. Rotten was a highly intelligent, iconoclastic, rebellious prankster that lent an almighty kick in the face to the mediocrity and stunted possibilities of the time. The Pistols gave a shot in the arse to the mucic 'industry' and the culture as a whole, and we should all be grateful to him for doing so. This is a superb film and should be seen by anyone interested in the possibilties of music to, if not change the world, then at least to severly ruffle it's feathers.
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Format: VHS Tape
Directed by Julien Temple, a first-hand witness of the 1970's UK Punk scene, The Filth and the Fury is an excellent docimentary of that most essential and influential of UK Punk bands, the Sex Pistols. Despite their questionable musical ability, and subsequent sell-out via the "Filthy Lucre" tours, you would be a fool to question the Sex Pistols impact on the music scene of the 1970's. The documentary covers the whole gamut, from the raging ego's of Malcolm McLaren and Johnny Rotten, right through the genuinly touching moments (Rotten's guilt and sorrow over losing his friend Sid Vicious, and the heart-warming if bizarre footage of the Christmas eve benefit of 1977 where the Pistols played at a party for the children of striking miners, and the kids got to pelt Johnny Rotten with custard pies!). The music is of course great, including the poignant footage of their swansong at Winterland, San Francicso in February of 1978. The movie also has its genuinly disturbing moments, including everything involving Nancy Spungeon, and ends with horrific footage of a hopelessly addicted Sid Vicious in the months before his overdose in 1979. Truly an essential purchase for the devotee of either the band or the punk movement as a whole.
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By The Wolf TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I came to this film having recently read Vivienne Westwood's (with Ian Kenny)
2014 autobiography, in itself a vivid and absorbing account of the genesis of punk
culture and the major players in the drama which unfolded in and around her
and Malcolm McClaren's chaotic World's End shop in the gloom of 1970's Britain.

Julian Temple's 2007 work about the rise and fall of The Sex Pistols is set against
a backdrop of national political turmoil and its impact on socially and emotionally
disaffected youth is an engaging and powerful masterclass in documentary making.

The recollections of surviving band members are shot in shadow, an at times
disconcerting technique which nonetheless serves to amplify the tawdry story.
Mr Rotten's narrative, in particular, is both articulate and curiously affecting.

Live footage of the band in their mercurial but damned ascendency captures
a real sense of what it must have been like to be trapped in a room with them!

Although by no means a fan at the time I find myself drawn to them in my dotage.

Highly Recommended.
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