Field Songs has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by momox co uk
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: From Europe's No.1 in used books & media articles.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £8.99

Field Songs CD

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

Price: £10.82 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
AutoRip is available only for eligible CDs and vinyl sold by Amazon EU Sarl (but does not apply to gift orders or PrimeNow orders). See Terms and Conditions for full details, including costs which may apply for the MP3 version in case of order returns or cancellations.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
17 new from £6.57 3 used from £5.08
£10.82 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's William Elliott Whitmore Store


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Field Songs
  • +
  • Animals In The Dark
  • +
  • Ashes To Dust
Total price: £30.70
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (11 July 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: ANTI
  • ASIN: B00517DMK2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 167,002 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Bury Your Burdens in the Ground
  2. Field Song
  3. Don't Need It
  4. Everything Gets Gone
  5. Let's Do Something Impossible
  6. Get There from Here
  7. We'll Carry On
  8. Not Feeling Any Pain

Product Description

titolo-field songsartista-william elliott whitmore etichetta-anti-/epitaph-n. dischi1data-28 giugno 2011supporto-cd audiogenere-folk e country---braniascolta 30''1.bury your burdens in the groundascolta2.field songascolta3.don't need itascolta4.everything gets goneascoltaascolta 30''5.let's do something impossibleascolta6.get there from hereascolta7.we'll carry onascolta8.not feeling any pain

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The phenomenon of William Elliott Whitmore's big, backwoods-preacher baritone is pretty well known by now (or bloody ought to be, at any rate), and 'Animals in the Dark', his last CD release, was an unmistakable sign of an artist growing into maturity.

'Field Songs' continues the line of that album - gruff, flinty country-folk songs blessed with a sparse beauty - but more than ever the songs are rooted in the earth of Whitmore's Iowa home. The rhythms and cycles of farming appear as as metaphors for life and living, birdsong is liberally sprinkled throughout the recordings and there is a strong feeling of the continuity of generations living in contact with nature. Although there is less outright rage here than on 'Animals', Whitmore hasn't gone soft - there are still horses with starved ribs showing, loaded guns, desert winds cutting into skin - but there is a feeling that even in a tough life good things are achievable.

Accompanied often just by his own guitar and banjo, these are songs of a hard life lived hard but, as he sings on 'Get There From Here', "I've seen darkness in my time, but the sun is gonna shine."
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Those of you who have played the innovative Xbox 360 game "Red Dead Redemption" will have already heard the deep raspy voice of William Elliott Whitmore singing without accompaniment on a haunting Western lament "Bury me not on the lone prairie", which in terms of tradition owes a much greater debt to Tom Waits than it does Hank Williams. His latest album is firmly located in that unflinching commitment to raw frontier folk and throughout its basically Whitmore's voice, assorted banjo's and guitars. William Elliott Whitmore was formerly a hard core punk and that ethic can also be found in the sparse songs of this vocalist and musician from Lee County, Iowa. In this album he rails agains the "manifest destiny of factory farms" on the haunting title track and states a powerful case for American individualism in the pumping "Don't need it".

This is by no means a long album and in one sense it might start to jar if it was. Whitmore makes little concessions to any explicit modern influences although strangely the banjo introduction to opener "Bury your burdens in the ground" does oddly remind this reviewer of the melody of The Beta Band's "Dry the Rain". When Whitmore does introduce the greater warmth of an acoustic guitar he also tends to counter this with a darker set of lyrics not least in "Everything gets gone" where he intones that like "shutters in the wind I'm just holding on" reminding all of the transient nature of existence. It is somewhat of a relief then when the mood lifts to something more uplighting in "Let's do something impossible", while the albums concluding song the primal "Not feeling any pain" would not go amiss being sung to a gospel gathering in a chapel in the humid ambience of the deep south.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Good album
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars William Elliott Whitmore - Fields of pain 16 July 2011
By Red on Black - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Those of you who have played the innovative Xbox 360 game "Red dead redemption" will have already heard the deep raspy voice of William Elliott Whitmore singing without accompaniment a haunting Western lament "Bury me not on the lone prairie" which in terms of tradition owes a much greater debt to Tom Waits than it does Hank Williams. His latest album is firmly located in that unflinching commitment to raw frontier folk and throughout its basically Whitmore's voice, assorted banjo's and guitars. William Elliott Whitmore was formerly a hunk core punk and that ethic can also be found in the sparse songs of this vocalist and musician from Lee County, Iowa. In this album he rails agains the "manifest destiny of factory farms" on the powerful title track and states a powerful case for American individualism in the pumping "Don't need it".

This is by no means a long album and in one sense it might start to jar if it was. Whitmore makes little concessions to any explicit modern influences although strangely the banjo introduction to opener "Bury your burdens in the ground" does remind this reviewer of the melody of The Beta Bands "Dry the Rain" (that said the old "hearing" is playing up at the moment!). When Whitmore does introduce the greater warmth of an acoustic guitar he also tends to counter this with a darker set of lyrics not least in "Everything gets gone" where he intones that like "shutters in the wind I'm just holding on" reminding all that we are just here for a little while. It is somewhat of a relief then when the mood lifts to something more uplighting in "Let's do something impossible", while the albums concluding song the primal "Not feeling any pain" would not go amiss being sung to a gospel gathering in a chapel within the deep south.

A reasonable complaint in reviews of albums of this character is that perhaps they need more more primary colours and musical variation, yet singers like Whitmore and his current spiritual counterpart Joe Purdy appear totally uninterested in making any comprises. The result is that "Field songs" is a powerful and unrelenting album of of raw rural American folk delivered by a stubborn minstrel hell bent on ploughing his own furrow and if you like it fine but if you dont you know what you can do.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Songs for Hard Times 19 Nov. 2011
By Steve Vrana - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Armed with only an acoustic guitar, a banjo, and a world-weary voice that belies his thirty-three years, William Elliot Whitmore has released his second CD for the Anti label.

At little more than thirty minutes and eight songs, Whitmore speaks to the hard times facing most Americans. Check out the album's closing track, the stark "Not Feeling Any Pain":

My sweat and blood are spilling out, no bandages can mend;
And in my mind there is no doubt that none of this trouble will ever end.
I've had my days, I've had my doubts
Of how this whole thing will play out;
But still I know that all I see
Someday soon will cease to be;
But I am not feeling any pain.

I saw Whitmore perform last year in a venue that barely accommodated three hundred people. It was an amazing show. He's coming back next month. (I've already got my tickets!) Listen to the samples; then get this album. You won't regret it. VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED [Running time - 34:09]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Backwoods baritone hangs up the heartache to sing songs of home and hope 20 July 2011
By Last Week's Album - Published on Amazon.com
William Elliott Whitmore is a beast, and Field Songs is his burden lifted. The record keeps his stark style intact with simple, traditional instrumentation and his booming baritone, while in the background, the ambient sounds of birds, roosters, frogs and insects form the perfect choral section. He's been through tough times. He's spent years and albums dealing with pain. And now he's finally emerged from the dust to sing and strum about loss less like a farmboy and more like a man. Whitmore will forever be toiling away on the farm, and Field Songs gives us yet another reason why - there's no place like home for healing the soul.

Full review:
[...]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Field Songs~Rustic Poetry 30 Nov. 2011
By T. L. Moffitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
William Elliott Whitmore sings with the birds, the tin roof, the rooster, the fence posts and muddy rows of a field. I've never heard someone's heart so close to home in a song, it's almost as if the rhythm of the beat of that heart keeps time with an old Ford 8N.
Give this music a chance, rustic poetry; everyone I've shared this CD with, after a slow time- asks who this is or WHAT this is...and if they can sit on the old swing a little longer and hear more.
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless 3 Jun. 2014
By PandaChris - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
WEW never disappoints. His music and voice speak to that country soul inside us all. Even if you've grown up in the big city all your life, anyone can relate to the themes within every song. This is perfect driving music, but also great so putting on while you're sitting out on the porch on a hot summer night. My personal favorite is the opening track "Bury Your Burdens in the Ground." If you get a chance, see this man live, it's an amazing experience.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback