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Fibber in the Heat Paperback – 26 Apr 2012

4.6 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (26 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091943124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091943127
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.5 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 354,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"It's a tale of slavish fandom, the highs and lows of which are illustrated with dexterity... It's not only cricket fans and journalists who'll appreciate this yarn - it's a tale for lovers in the wider sense, and of the boundaries they'll cross" (Independent)

"Crisply funny... Jupp is a genteel treat" (Guardian)

"Jupp is intelligent, charismatic and one of the most established raconteurs around" (Time Out)

"Delightful and full of selfmockery" (Mail on Sunday)

"His tribute to the simple pleasures of fandom is a touching one" (Guardian)

Book Description

Comedian and cricket obsessive Miles Jupp hatches an ill-conceived plan to join the England cricket team in India

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I picked this book as I am a great fan of Miles Jupp with his sense of humour, love the In and out of the kitchen series. so I was delighted to find this book and settled back to try reading it as if Miles was delivering it to me.
Unfortunately I found the funny lines were just too sparse for me. I am not a cricket fan, ( I know its all about cricket) but have read another book with a cricket theme "Riding to the Ashes" which I enjoyed.
If you love cricket you may well enjoy recalling the play of the 2006 India tour, but for me just too many pages to skim through.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Well, I wasn't sure whether this book was going to be my thing or not but I was hooked after the first couple of pages. I laughed out loud and chortled my way through my tram-bound commute to a coroners inquest - perhaps inappropriately, in retrospect.

Great stuff and I thoroughly recommend it to cricket fans and cricket casual acquaintances alike!
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A relaxing read and Miles comes across well; happy to recount quite a few moments when things are difficult and frustrating, which sums up quite big swathes of the whole trip in fact! As much a personal journey of someone trying to work out what to do with their life, as anything else. Always interesting to get some impression as to what famous ex-cricketers, now commentators, are like behind the scenes. The more generalised insight into how the press corps operates was also good. I happen to be studying Divinity at Edinburgh too, as a matter of fact; so if you read this, Miles, greetings from New College.
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A confession: I have never watched 'Balamory', so I knew very little about Miles until he started making TV appearances on panel shows and such things. I found that he came across as bright, articulate and likeable, so I thought I'd give this book a try.

I did fear that it would be yet another book of forced, matey Cricket humour, but it isn't that. In fact, what you find yourself reading is an enjoyably humorous look behind the scenes that gives the reader an idea of what it is like to follow the England cricket team as a job, rather than as a fan.

Miles battles with sweltering heat, fear of being unmasked as a fraud, elusive accreditation and his bowels. But while many of the people he finds himself meeting, from ex-players to experienced journalists, turn out to be friendly and helpful, he finds himself questioning whether being paid to watch Cricket is actually all it is cracked up to be.
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Format: Paperback
This book recounts Miles Jupp's attempts to blag his way as a cricket journalist on England's tour of India in 2006. Despite no experience, Jupp decides this is simply what he has to do; he loves cricket and feels envious of the occupants of the press box, so decides to attempt to join them. By deceit and trickery, he persuades BBC Scotland and the Western Mail (South Wales) to cover the tour for them, but this doesn't result in a smooth passage. He has endless trouble getting hold of a press pass, and, once in India, neither potential employer seems keen to engage him in any real journalistic work. He does end up writing a blog for the Western Mail, though. Jupp's tale is one of hapless and often hilarious woe; he quickly shows himself up in the press box by acting like a fan rather than a journalist, and there are several other moments that made me cringe on his behalf. However, as the tour goes on, a rather nasty stomach complaint gives him time to reflect on the situation he finds himself in; journalism seems harder than he thought, and the change in attitude from supporter to someone watching the cricket as part of their job is far bigger than he'd imagined. After feeling thoroughly fed up, he does, however, rekindle his passion for cricket, but once again as a supporter, rather than a journalist. Throughout, the story is told with self-deprecating good humour, and it's an easy, enjoyable read.
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This is a book by someone who sets out to become a cricket journalist but fails, following an England test tour of India that ends as a draw. So as a piece of work it has some inbuilt miss-fires and false steps, a bit like a fast bowler steaming in to the wicket only to pull up just before the delivery stride. This may explain why it took so long to become a book, given that the action in question took place in 2005/2006 in the national cricketing euphoria immediately after England's historic Ashes victory. But, as the publishers would no doubt argue, a good travel book is about the journey rather than the destination. However, this isn't a travel book, despite Miles Jupp's attempts to throw in the usual litany of Indian travel woes (taxi traumas, toilet traumas, train traumas, tiger traumas etc, etc). Instead, this is really about someone trying to "find their place", as Jupp lurches from his embryonic entertainment career towards something that he hopes will be more challenging and rewarding. The "place" he is looking for isn't just about finding his true calling or getting a seat with his name on it in the press box - it's about being accepted by the battle-hardened journalists he tries to rub along with, and ultimately the discovery he makes is that he doesn't want to be with the joyless men of the press at all really. He wants to be out in the stands with the fans, where he can clap and cheer and be himself. The last seven years have shown that Miles' true niche was in entertainment afterall, and not in writing books, and this work seems to emphasise that. This is fine, but "In And Out Of The kitchen" on Radio 4 is miles better.
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